Sydney Papers: Consisting of a Journal of the Earl of Leicester, and Original Letters of Algernon Sydney

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Page 76 - ... consisting of eighty gallant men, the meanest whereof a Commander or Esquire, in stately habit; — with trumpets sounding, almost to the shaking of Charing Cross, had it been now standing. Of his Lifeguard many are Colonels; and, believe me, it's such a guard as is hardly to be paralleled in the world. And now have at you, my Lord of Ormond ! You will have men of gallantry to encounter ; whom to overcome will be honor sufficient, and to be beaten by them will be no great blemish to your reputation....
Page 63 - On the morrow it was further resolved 'that it hath been found by experience, and this house doth declare, that the office of a king in this nation, and to have the power thereof in any single person, is unnecessary, burdensome, and dangerous to the liberty, safety, and publick interest of the people of this nation; and therefore ought to be abolished...
Page 60 - I thank you heartily, my Lord, for that. I had almost forgotten it. In troth, Sirs, my conscience in religion, I think, is very well known to all the world, and therefore I declare before you all that I die a Christian according to the profession of the Church of England, as I found it left me by my father.
Page 46 - That by the fundamental laws of this kingdom, it is treason in the King of England, for the time being, to levy war against the Parliament and Kingdom of England...
Page 76 - This evening, about five of the clock, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland began his journey ; by the way of Windsor, and so to Bristol. He went forth in that state and equipage as the like hath hardly been seen ; himself in a coach with six gallant Flanders...
Page 97 - I do declare and promise that I will be true and faithful to the Commonwealth of England as it is now established, without a King or House of Lords.
Page xv - I condemn any but you for it. If it be so, you have played the very knave with me ; and so I will make you know, if I have good proof of it. But that for so much as is past. For that is to come, I assure you before God, that if ever I know you do so much as read any letter I write to my father without his commandment, or my consent, I will thrust my dagger into you.
Page 268 - The earl of Leicester was a man of great parts, very conversant in books, and much addicted to the mathematics; and though he had been a soldier, and commanded a regiment, in the service of the States of the United Provinces, and was afterwards employed in several embassies, as in Denmark and in France, was in truth rather a speculative, than a practical man...
Page 204 - ... army, contrary to promise, confirmed me in my resolutions not to return. To conclude ; the tide is not to be diverted, nor the oppressed delivered; but God, in his time, will have mercy on his people ; he will save and defend them, and avenge the blood of those who shall now perish, upon the heads of those who, in their pride, think nothing is able to oppose them. Happy are those whom God shall make instruments of his justice in so blessed a work. If I can live to see that day, I shall be ripe...
Page 209 - ... party, I spoke to the general in your behalf, who told me, that very ill offices had been done you ; but he would assist you as much as justly he could. And I intended then also to speak to somebody else ; you may guess whom I mean...

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