The Life of Edward Earl of Clarendon: ... Containing, (I. An Account of the Chancellor's Life from His Birth to the Restoration in 1660. II. A Continuation of the Same, and of His History of the Grand Rebellion, from the Restoration to His Banishment in 1667

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Clarendon printing-house, 1761 - Great Britain

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Page 114 - Which is more wonderful,' says Lord Clarendon, 'all this was done and settled within little more than two years to that degree of perfection that there were many buildings raised for beauty as well as use, orderly and regular plantations of trees and fences and...
Page 286 - ... by him; and that I will conform to the liturgy of the Church of England, as it is now by law established: and I do declare that I do hold there lies no obligation upon me, or on any other person, from the oath commonly called the Solemn League and Covenant...
Page 114 - ... at very valuable rates, and jointures made upon marriages, and all other conveyances and settlements executed, as in a kingdom at peace within itself, and where no doubt could be made of the validity of titles.
Page 137 - Presbyterians, by which, if their humour and spirit were not enough discovered and known, their want of ingenuity and integrity would be manifest; and how impossible it is for men, who would not be deceived, to depend on either. When the declaration had been delivered to the ministers, there was a clause in it, in which the king declared " his own constant practice of the Common Prayer...
Page 313 - ... the women who attended her, and conversed with the religious who resided there, and without doubt in her inclinations was enough disposed to have been one of that number. And from this restraint she was called out to be a great queen, and to a free conversation in a court that was to be , upon the matter new formed, and reduced from the manners of a licentious age to the old rules and limits which had been observed in better times; and to which regular and decent conformity the present disposition...
Page 112 - ... such a numerous people, that they knew not how to dispose of : and though they were declared to be all forfeited, and so to have no title to any thing, yet they must remain somewhere.
Page 313 - ... former queens had, she might have prevailed as far by degrees as they had done. But the truth is, though- she was of years enough to have had more experience of the world, and of as much wit as could be wished, and of a humour very agreeable at some seasons; yet...
Page 409 - He confessed that he had often himself read over that bill ; and though there is no colour for the fancy of the determination of this parliament ; yet he would not deny to them, that...
Page 239 - ... to give him all the assistance he could with convenience, for the carrying on the expedition for Scotland. And for the better preventing of any inconvenience that might fall out by the rashness and inadvertency of the marquis of Antrim towards the lord lieutenant, his...
Page 112 - The land within this circuit, the most barren in the kingdom, was out of the grace and mercy of the conquerors assigned to those of the nation who were enclosed, in such proportions as might with great industry preserve their lives.

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