The Mechanic

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Burnett & King, 1842 - Man-woman relationships - 219 pages

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Contents

I
13
II
19
III
27
IV
39
V
47
VI
54
VII
67
VIII
79
X
104
XI
117
XII
131
XIII
145
XIV
157
XV
174
XVI
198
XVII
216

IX
87

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Page 47 - Mark you this, Bassanio, The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. An evil soul, producing holy witness, Is like a villain with a smiling cheek ; A goodly apple rotten at the heart : O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath ! Shy.
Page 19 - THAT AND A' THAT" Is there, for honest Poverty, That hangs his head, and a' that! The coward slave, we pass him by, We dare be poor for a
Page 117 - And truly it demands something godlike in him who has cast off the common motives of humanity, and has ventured to trust himself for a taskmaster.
Page 157 - Oft she rejects, but never once offends. Bright as the sun, her eyes the gazers strike, And, like the sun, they shine on all alike. Yet graceful ease, and sweetness void of pride, Might hide her faults, if belles had faults to hide: If to her share some female errors fall, Look on her face, and you'll forget them all.
Page 87 - IT is not what a man outwardly has or wants that constitutes the happiness or misery of him. Nakedness, hunger, distress of all kinds, death itself have been cheerfully suffered, when the heart was right. It is the feeling of injustice that is insupportable to all men. The brutalest black African cannot bear that he should be used unjustly. No man can bear it, or ought to bear it.
Page 79 - And yet that there is verily a " rights of man " let no mortal doubt. An ideal of right does dwell in all men, in all arrangements, pactions and procedures of men : it is to this ideal of right, more and more developing itself as it is more and more approximated to, that human Society forever tends and struggles. We say also that any given thing either...
Page 145 - Deeper, deeper, let us toil In the mines of knowledge , Nature's wealth, and learning's spoil, Win from school and college ; Delve we there for richer gems, Than the stars of diadems. Onward, onward, may we press Through the path of duty ; Virtue is true happiness, Excellence true beauty ; Minds are of celestial birth. Make we then a heaven of earth.
Page 6 - LIBRARY FROM THE BEQUEST OF EVERT JANSEN WENDELL 1918 Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year...
Page 27 - To thine own self be true ; And it must follow, as the night to day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Page 87 - African cannot bear that he should be used unjustly. No man can bear it, or ought to bear it. A deeper law than any parchment-law whatsoever, a law written direct by the hand of God in the inmost being of man, incessantly protests against it.

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