The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature

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W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1809 - English literature

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Page 232 - For we are saved by hope : but hope that is seen is not hope : for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? But if we hope for that we see not, then do we with patience wait for it.
Page 342 - The dance gaed thro' the lighted ha', To thee my fancy took its wing, I sat, but neither heard nor saw ; Tho' this was fair, and that was braw, And yon the toast of a' the town, I sigh'd, and said amang them a', "Ye are na Mary Morison.
Page 417 - I see their situation, know their danger, and participate their sufferings, without having it in my power to give them further relief, than uncertain promises. In short, I see inevitable destruction in so clear a light, that, unless vigorous measures are taken by the Assembly, and speedy assistance sent from below, the poor inhabitants that are now in forts, must unavoidably fall, while the remainder are flying before the barbarous foe.
Page 99 - And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads; And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
Page 349 - Doon, How can ye blume sae fair ! How can ye chant, ye little birds, And I sae fu' o' care. Thou'll break my heart, thou bonie bird, That sings upon the bough ; Thou minds me o' the happy days, When my fause luve was true. Thou'll break my heart, thou bonie bird, That sings beside thy mate ; For sae I sat, and sae I sang, And wist na o
Page 262 - Her pure and eloquent blood Spoke in her cheeks, and so distinctly wrought, That one might almost say her body thought.
Page 418 - That I have foibles, and perhaps many of them, I shall not deny; I should esteem myself, as the world also would, vain and empty, were I to arrogate perfection.
Page 425 - Since the date of my last we have had the virtue and patience of the army put to the severest trial. Sometimes it has been five or six days together without bread; at other times, as many days without meat; and once or twice, two or three days, without either.
Page 425 - ... on whom I was obliged to call, expose our situation to them, and in plain terms declare that we were reduced to the alternative of disbanding or catering for ourselves, unless the inhabitants would afford us their aid. I allotted to each county a certain proportion of flour or grain, and a certain number of cattle, to be delivered on certain days; and, for the honor of the magistrates, and...
Page 347 - Here's freedom to him that wad read, Here's freedom to him that wad write ! There's nane ever fear'd that the truth should be heard, But they wham the truth wad indite. Here's a health to them that's awa, Here's a health to them that's awa, Here's Chieftain M'Leod, a Chieftain worth gowd, Tho' bred among mountains o' snaw ! I'M OWRE YOUNG TO MARRY YET.

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