History of England: from the peace of Utrecht to the peace of Versailles, 1713-1783, Volume 6

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Page 213 - ... against your Protestant brethren; to lay waste their country, to desolate their dwellings, and extirpate their race and name, with these horrible hell-hounds of savage war! — hell-hounds, I say, of savage war.
Page 51 - His violent prejudice against our West Indian and American settlers appeared whenever there was an opportunity. Towards the conclusion of his " Taxation no Tyranny," he says, " how is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?
Page 322 - It was at Rome, on the 15th of October 1764, as I sat musing amidst the ruins of the Capitol, while the barefooted friars were singing vespers in the temple of Jupiter,* that the idea of writing the decline and fall of the city first started to my mind.
Page 24 - We shall be forced -ultimately to retract ; let us retract while we can, not when we must. I say we must necessarily undo these violent, oppressive acts ; they must be repealed — you will repeal them ; I pledge myself for it, that you will in the end repeal them ; I stake my reputation on it, I will consent to be taken for an idiot if they are not finally repealed.
Page 24 - Thucydides, and have studied and admired the master states of the world — that for solidity of reasoning, force of sagacity, and wisdom of conclusion, under such a complication of difficult circumstances, no nation, or body of men, can stand in preference to the general congress at Philadelphia.
Page 82 - If Lord Chatham's son should be in Canada, and in any way fall into your power, you are enjoined to treat him with all possible deference and respect. You cannot err in paying too much honor to the son of so illustrious a character and so true a friend to America.
Page 53 - You may believe me, my dear Patsy, when I assure you, in the most solemn manner, that, so far from seeking this appointment, I have used every endeavor in my power to avoid it, not only from my unwillingness to part with you and the family, but from a consciousness of its being a trust too great for my capacity...
Page 64 - If we wish to be free; if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending: if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in...
Page 209 - German despot ; your attempts will be for ever vain and impotent — doubly so, indeed, from this mercenary aid on which you rely; for it irritates, to an incurable resentment, the minds of your adversaries, to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder, devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling cruelty. If I were an American, as I am an Englishman, while a foreign troop was landed in my country, I never would lay down my arms : Never, never, never...
Page 52 - The benevolence of your heart, my dear Marquis, is so conspicuous upon all occasions, that I never wonder at any fresh proofs of it ; but your late purchase of an estate in the colony of Cayenne, with a view of emancipating the slaves on it, is a generous and noble proof of your humanity. Would to God a like spirit might diffuse itself generally into the minds of the people of this country ! But I despair of seeing it.

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