The Works of the Late Edward Dayes: Containing An Excursion Through the Principal Parts of Derbyshire and Yorkshire, with Illustrative Notes by E.W. Brayley; Essays on Painting; Instructions for Drawing and Coloring Landscapes; and Professional Sketches of Modern Artists

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Mrs. Dayes, 1805 - Artists - 359 pages
 

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Page 183 - Where the great sun begins his state, Rob'd in flames, and amber light, The clouds in thousand liveries dight; While the ploughman, near at hand, Whistles o'er the furrow'd land, And the milkmaid singeth blithe, And the mower whets his scythe, And every shepherd tells his tale, Under the hawthorn in the dale.
Page 245 - Travel, in the younger sort, is a part of education; in the elder, a part of experience. He that travelleth into a country, before he hath some entrance into the language, goeth to school, and not to travel.
Page 127 - That cast an awful look below; Whose ragged walls the ivy creeps, And with her arms from falling keeps. So both a safety from the wind On mutual dependence find. 'Tis now the raven's bleak abode; 'Tis now th...
Page 199 - A blank, my lord : She never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i...
Page 275 - OF all the causes which conspire to blind Man's erring judgment, and misguide the mind, What the weak head with strongest bias rules, Is pride, the never-failing vice of fools.
Page 231 - Be not too tame, neither, but let your own discretion be your tutor; suit the action to the word, the word to the action; with this special observance, that you o'erstep not the modesty of nature...
Page 292 - The gloomy pine, the poplar blue, The yellow beech, the sable yew, The slender fir, that taper grows, The sturdy oak with broad-spread boughs.
Page 277 - Nods o'er the mount beneath. At every step, Solemn, and slow, the shadows blacker fall, And all is awful listening gloom around. These are the haunts of Meditation, these The scenes where ancient bards th...
Page 45 - I have been bullied by an usurper ; I have been neglected by a court ; but I will not be dictated to by a subject : your man shan't stand. " ANNE Dorset, Pembroke and Montgomery.
Page 189 - Of envied life ; though only few possess Patrician treasures or imperial state ; Yet Nature's care, to all her children just, With richer treasures and an ampler state, Endows at large whatever happy man Will deign to use them. His the city's pomp, The rural honours his. Whate'er adorns The princely dome, the column and the arch, The breathing marbles and the sculptur'd gold, Beyond the proud possessor's narrow claim, His tuneful breast enjoys.

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