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MEMORS

ILLUSTRATIVE OF

THE IIISTORY AND ANTIQUITIES

OF

NORTHUMBERL A N D.

COMMUNICATED TO THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE

ARCHÆOLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF GREAT BRITAIN AND

IRELAND

HELD AT NEWCASTLE IN AUGUST 1852.

VOL. II.

FEUDAL AND MILITARY ANTIQUITIES.

I

PLONDON:

BELL AND DALDY, 186 FLEET STREET.

1858.

[blocks in formation]

ANTIQUITIES

OF

NORTHUMBERLAND

AND THE

SCOTTISH BORDERS:

ILLUSTRATED BY

THE BARONIAL HISTORIES OF ALNWICK, PRUDHOE, AND WARK.

BY

THE REV. CHARLES HENRY HARTSHORNE, M.A.

RECTOR OF HOLDENBY,

HONORARY ASSOCIATE OF THE SOCIÉTÉ FRANÇAISE POUR LA CONSERVATION DES MONUMENS HISTORIQUES
DE FRANCE, AND HONORARY FRI.LOW OF THE SOCIETY OF ANTIQUARIES OF

NEWCASTLE-ON-TYRE,

LONDON:
BELL AND DALDY, 186 FLEET STREET.

1858.

PREFACE.

In the present volume I have endeavoured to illustrate the Feudal and Military Antiquities of Northumberland and the Scottish Borders, by uniting the result of personal surveys with an extensive search amongst such unprinted sources of information as were most likely to cast any light upon their history. The inquiry has necessarily occupied some time, since I have had occasion to travel over very wide and, in many instances, unfrequented and remote districts, over a division of the kingdom that includes the whole of the northern counties touching upon Scotland, as well as those parts of Scotland adjoining them. In consequence of taking this more comprehensive view, what was offered to the meeting of the Archæological Institute at Newcastle simply as an historical outline of one department of Northumberland, has become expanded so as to embrace a greater number of kindred subjects.

By thus studying the military architecture of so extensive a district, I have been enabled to detect many resemblances as well as local peculiarities of style ; both assimilating to works of the same age and character elsewhere, and presenting singular differences,—some occasioned by the force of circumstances, and others by a later adoption of the prevailing fashion. Through this light thrown by architecture upon history, and in its turn by history upon architecture, whenever it was possible to obtain their combined assistance, numerous facts regarding this very interesting portion of Great Britain have been brought together and presented for the first time to the reader's notice. It has been my aim, throughout the inquiry, to direct attention to such parts of

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