Smugglers and Smuggling

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Duffield, 1924 - Smugglers - 327 pages

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Page 71 - ... restores him to health; on the ermine which decorates the judge, and the rope which hangs the criminal; on the poor man's salt, and the rich man's spice; on the brass nails of the coffin and the ribands of the bride; at bed or board; couchant or levant we must pay.
Page 82 - If you wake at midnight, and hear a horse's feet, Don't go drawing back the blind, or looking in the street. Them that asks no questions isn't told a lie. Watch the wall, my darling, while the Gentlemen go by!
Page 71 - His whole property is then immediately taxed from two to ten per cent. Besides the probate, large fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues are handed down to posterity on taxed marble ; and he...
Page 71 - Taxes on the sauce which pampers man's appetite, and the drug that restores him to health ; on the ermine which decorates the judge, and the rope which hangs the criminal ; on the poor man's salt, and the rich man's spice; on the brass nails of the coffin, and the ribands of the bride.
Page 31 - ... wood, of the growth, production, or manufacture of any English plantations in America, Asia, or Africa, shall be shipped, carried, conveyed, or transported from any of the said English plantations, to any land, island, territory, dominion, port, or place whatsoever, other than to such other English plantations as do belong to his Majesty...
Page 71 - Taxes on everything on earth, and the waters under the earth ; on everything that comes from abroad, or is grown at home. Taxes on the raw material ; taxes on every fresh value that is added to it by the industry of man. Taxes on the sauce which pampers...
Page 31 - ... any land, island, territory, dominion, port, or place whatsoever, other than to such other English plantations as do belong to his Majesty, his...
Page 141 - A little tea, one leaf I did not steal. For guiltless bloodshed I to God appeal ; Put tea in one scale, human blood in t'other And think what 'tis to slay a harmless brother.
Page 142 - I am not dead, but sleepeth here, And when the Trumpet Sound I will appear. Four balls thro' me Pearced there way. Hard it was. I'd no time to pray. This stone that here you Do see My Comerades erected for the sake of me.

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