The R.I. Schoolmaster, Volume 19

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Page 91 - ... the child doubteth in nothing that his master taught him before. After this, the child must take a paper book, and sitting in some place where no man shall prompt him, by himself, let him translate into English his former lesson. Then, showing it to his master, let the master take from him his Latin book, and pausing an hour at the least, then let the child translate his own English into Latin again in another paper book. When the child bringeth it, turned into Latin, the master must compare...
Page 11 - Ocean, the first thing which strikes us is, that, the north-east and south-east monsoons, which are found the one on the north and the other on the south side of the...
Page 92 - I came to Broadgate, in Leicestershire, to take my leave of that noble Lady Jane Grey, to whom I was exceeding much beholding. Her parents, the duke and the duchess, with all the household, gentlemen and gentlewomen, were hunting in the park. I found her in her chamber reading...
Page 108 - While from the bounded level of our mind Short views we take, nor see the lengths behind ; But, more...
Page 429 - And let us with caution indulge the supposition that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be conceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure, reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can prevail in exclusion of religious principle.
Page 353 - All unseen, the Master walketh By the toiling servant's side; Comfortable words He talketh, Grief, nor pain, nor any sorrow, Rends thy breast, to Him unknown ; He to-day, and He to-morrow, Grace sufficient gives His own.
Page 173 - What other yearning was the master tie Of the monastic brotherhood, upon rock Aerial, or in green secluded vale, One after one, collected from afar, An undissolving fellowship ? — What but this, The universal instinct of repose, The longing for confirmed tranquillity, Inward and outward ; humble, yet sublime : The life where hope and memory are as one ; Earth quiet and unchanged ; the human soul Consistent in self-rule ; and heaven revealed To meditation in that quietness...
Page 94 - Yea I believe, that beside her perfect readiness in Latin, Italian, French, and Spanish, she readeth here now at Windsor more Greek every day than some prebendary of this church doth read Latin in a whole week.
Page 312 - I regard it as an irretrievable misfortune that my childhood was not a happy one. By nature I was exceedingly elastic and buoyant, but the poverty of my parents subjected me to continual privations.
Page 314 - I had a love of knowledge which nothing could repress. An inward voice raised its plaint forever in my heart for something nobler and better ; and, if my parents had not the means to give me knowledge, they intensified the love of it. They always spoke of learning and learned men with enthusiasm and a kind of reverence.

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