Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

you had the kindness to hand me, permit me to say that I have not examined it in all its details. But from the slight exami. nation which I have given it, without instituting a strict coin. parison between it and others, which have fallen under my no. tice, I have no hesitation in saying, that I consider it a valua. ble work. The general principles of Arithmetic, so far as I observe, are clearly and fully explained. The latter part ol the work, embracing the elements of Geometry, Mensuration, &c. may be very useful to many persons, whose business requires some acquaintance with those subjects, and who have not the leisure or opportunity to study more extensive treatises.

Yours, very respectfully,

A. CASWELL.

[blocks in formation]

Extract of a letter from Isaac Thurber, Esq.

PROVIDENCE, Oct. 4th, 1832. DEAR SIR-Upon examining your Arithmetic in manuscript, and, subseqently, the first edition from the press, I consider it a work, possessing such improvements in treating upon the science of numbers, and in the illustration of the Rules of Arithmetic, as to entitle it to general reception in schools. By the method of answering such interrogations as will naturally arise in the mind of the student, he is led on, by easy grada. tions, to a thorough acquaintance with figures, without the embarassment which frequently arises in the mind of the young from an obscurity of the language in which the explanations are given. Besides, the examples being drawn from mercantile, manufacturing, and mechanical business, and the various pursuits of life, are designed to render it of greater practical utility, than any publication of the kind that has fallen under my observation. I am, sir, yours, &ca

ISAAC THURBER.

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

From the Rev. David Pickering, one of the Committee of

Public Schools. I have examined, with considerable care and attention, - Ainsworth's Practical Mercantile Arithmetic,” and after a careful examination of the work, and such comparison with other similar productions as frequent opportunities have af. forded, I am satisfied that it deserves a decided preference over any other now in use; and I cannot but hope that it will shortly be introduced into the public and private schools, gen. rally, throughout our State and country.

PROVIDENCE, Nov. 2, 1832. DAVID PICKERING.

3 of

Among the numerous recommendations which have been re. ceived for the first edition, from the teachers of Providence, and from others in Massachusetts, and also from other literary gentlemen of high standing, the following will serve to show the estimation in which the work is held by those who have had an opportunity of examining it.

RECOMMENDATIONS.

From Zachariah Allen, Esq. Author of Science of Mechanics," Practical Tourist,doc.

PROVIDENCE, Aug. 20, 1832. Mr. Luther Ainsworth,

DEAR SIR-Judging from a hasty examination of your work, much judicious skill has been displayed in selecting practical examples to illustrate the actual application of the rules of Arithmetic, to the business-like transactions of life. That the

Practical Mercantile Arithmetic” may meet with the suc. cess which I think it merits, is the sincere hope of

Yours, very respectfully,

Z. ALLEN.

From William Aplin, Esq. Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, and one of the Committee of Public Schools.

PROVIDENCE, Nov. 3d, 1832. Mr. Luther Ainsworth,

DEAR SIR-Your work, entitled “ Ainsworth's Practical Mercantile Arithmetic, sent to me by you sometime since, I have examined, for the most part, carefully; and am prepared to say, that in my opinion the compilation, in its happy combination of familiar explanations and illustrations, so much needed and required for youthful learners, is, as a whole, decidedly superior to any work on this science, which I have ever seen. I think it will be viewed and encouraged by the public as an improvement in this department of learning.

Yours respectfully,

WILLIAM APLIN.

From Rev. Alexis Caswell, Professor of Mathematics.

BROWN UNIVERSITY, Oct 19, 1832. Dear Sir-In answer to your letter, requesting my opinion of the “ merits or demerits” of your Arithmetic, a copy of which

you had the kindness to hand me, permit me to say that I have not examined it in all its details. But from the slight exami. nation which I have given it, without instituting a strict com. parison between it and others, which have fallen under my no. tice, I have no hesitation in saying, that I consider it a valua. ble work. The general principles of Arithmetic, so far as I observe, are clearly and fully explained. The latter part of the work, embracing the elements of Geometry, Mensuration, &c. may be very useful to many persons, whose business requires some acquaintance with those subjects, and who have not the leisure or opportunity to study more extensive treatises.

Yours, very respectfully,

A. CĂSWELL.

Extract of a letter from Isaac Thurber, Esq.

PROVIDENCE, Oct. 4th, 1832. DEAR SIR~Upon examining your Arithmetic in manuscript, and, subseqently, the first edition from the press, I consider it a work, possessing such improvements in treating upon the science of numbers, and in the illustration of the Rules of Arithmetic, as to entitle it to general reception in schools. By the method of answering such interrogations as will naturally arise in the mind of the student, he is led on, by easy gradations, to a thorough acquaintance with figures, without the embarassment which frequently arises in the mind of the young from an obscurity of the language in which the explanations are given. Besides, the examples being drawn from mercan. tile, manufacturing, and mechanical business, and the various pursuits of life, are designed to render it of greater practical utility, than any publication of the kind that has fallen under my observation.

I am, sir, yours, &c.

ISAAC THURBER.

[ocr errors]

From the Rev. David Pickering, one of the Committee of

Public Schools. I have examined, with considerable care and attention, “Ainsworth's Practical Mercantile Arithmetic," and after a careful examination of the work, and such comparison with other similar productions as frequent opportunities have af. forded, I am satisfied that it deserves a decided preference over any other now in use; and I cannot but hope that it will shortly be introduced into the public and private schools, gen. rally, throughout our State and country.

PROVIDENCE, Nov. 2, 1832. DAVID PICKERING.

The following are from respectable and experienced Teachers,

in the City of Providence, Mr. Ainsworth,

Dear Sir, I have been highly gratified by the examination of

your “ Practical Mercantile Arithmetic.” The principles of the science are unfolded, and its practical uses explained, with great perspicuity and simplicity. I think

your reasonings and illustrations are peculiarly happy and original; and therefore do not hesitate to recommend it, very highly, to every person who wishes to teach Arithmetic intelligibly.

I am, with great respect, yours, &c. OCTOBER 9th, 1832.

ALFRED RICKARD.

I fully and cheerfully concur in the sentiments above ex. pressed.

MOSES NOYES, OCTOBER 15th, 1832.

I also, with pleasure, add my full and hearty concurrence in the approbation of the work, above expressed. OCTOBER, 1832.

JOHN H. WILLARD.

Mr. Ainsworth,

DEAR SIR—From the examination that I have made of your “ Practical Mercantile Arithmetic,” I deem it worthy its title. I like it chiefly on account of the novelty and practical nature of the problems; and think it equal to any other work on the same system, with which I am acquainted.

Very respectfully, yours, OCTOBER 11th, 1832.

č. SOULE CARTEE:

Mr. Ainsworth,

SIR-Having, with much care and attention, examined your “Practical Mercantile Arithmetic," I take pleasure in saying, that I consider it a very valuable work on that important sci. ence. It contains, I think, many improvements, and, in its practical tendency, possesses many advantages over any other Arithmetic that has come under my observation. Your meth. od of illustrating the rules by interrogations and answers, bearing on the most important points to be explained, is well calculated to give the pupil a ready and comprehensive view of the subject, and to save the teacher much perplexity and trouble. I therefore cheerfully recommend it, as being partic. ularly worthy the attention of teachers, and the patronage of the public generally. I am, sir, respectfully, yours, OCTOBER 16th, 1832.

JOS. B. PETTIS.

Mr. Luther Ainsworth,

DEAR SIR-I have examined your “Practical Mercantil: Arithmetic," and would recommend that others, who are en. gaged in the cause of education, should do the same; especially if they have any desire to encourage a work that is twig practical, and, in many respects, well calculated to supply the deficiencies of the arithmetical text books, now in use. I will add, that I am particularly pleased with your arrangement throughout the work, and hope it may succeed according w iis merits.. Respectfully yours, &c. ESEK ALDRICH.

PROVIDENCE, Nov. 2d, 1832. Mr. Ainsworth,

DEAR SIR-I have examined your Arithmetic, and am happy to say I think it well calculated to advance scholars in the practical knowledge of this important branch of education, and to aid those teachers who prefer the use of a written system, to the oral method of teaching, Respectfully yours,

OLIVER ANGELL. I concur with the above.

E. W. BAKER.

[ocr errors]

From Rev. Samuel J. May.
Mr. Luther Ainsworth,

I have examined your Arithmetic, and am happy to say that · I consider it a valuable compend of all that arithmetical sci. ence, which men need to possess, in order to the successful transaction of the common business of life, and I deem, sir, that men need a great deal more of this science, than they generally possess. I should think the merchant and mechanic would do well to have this volume always at hand. As a school book, I know of no text book to which I should give the preference, except only Colburn's First Lessons and Sequel. I am persuaded that mental exercises in Arithmetic, ought to precede. exercises upon the slate.* Your Arithmetic, however, would be of great use in a school where Colburn's system might be adopted, particularly for those pupils who are somewhat advanced.

Respectfully yours,
BROOKLYN, April 30, 1834. SAMUEL J. MAY.

* This opinion in regard to the necessity of mental exercises as a preparatory course, has become so general, that it is considered as naturally appertaining to books prepared for the instruction of youth. In accordance with this opinion, the author has added a complete course of introductory mental exercises, without deduct, ing from the practical nature of the work.

« PreviousContinue »