The Works of D. Jonathan Swift: In Nine Volumes, Volume 1

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Dublin printed; and Edinburgh reprinted, for G. Hamilton & J. Balfour, and L. Hunter, at Edinburgh; and A. Stalker, at Glasgow; and sold by them and other booksellers., 1752
 

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Page 171 - I would by no means give ladies the trouble of advising us in the reformation of our language, yet I cannot help thinking that, since they have been left out of all meetings, except parties at play or where worse designs are carried on, our conversation has very much degenerated.
Page 172 - It is your lordship's observation, that if it were not for the Bible and Common Prayer Book in the vulgar tongue, we should hardly be able to understand anything that was written among us a hundred years ago; which is certainly true, for those books, being perpetually read in churches, have proved a kind of standard for language, especially to the common people.
Page 82 - For it is confidently reported, that two young gentlemen of real hopes, bright wit, and profound judgment, who, upon a thorough examination of causes and effects, and by the mere force of natural abilities, without the least tincture of...
Page 165 - ... if it were once refined to a certain standard, perhaps there might be ways found out to fix it for ever, or at least till we are invaded and made a conquest by some other state...
Page 47 - This single stick, which you now behold ingloriously lying in that neglected corner, I once knew in a flourishing state in a forest: it was full of sap, full of leaves, and full of boughs: but now, in...
Page 246 - ... they are not so much as taught to spell in their childhood, nor can ever attain to it in their whole lives.
Page 172 - Bible were masters of an English style much fitter for that work, than any we see in our present writings ; which I take to be owing to the simplicity that runs through the whole.
Page 90 - And to urge another argument of a parallel nature: if Christianity were once abolished, how could the freethinkers, the strong reasoners, and the men of profound learning, be able to find another subject, so calculated in all points, whereon to display their abilities?
Page 84 - It is likewise urged that there are, by computation, in this kingdom above ten thousand parsons, whose revenues added to those of my lords the bishops would suffice to maintain at least two hundred young gentlemen of wit and pleasure and free-thinking, enemies to priestcraft, narrow principles, pedantry, and prejudices; who might be an ornament to the Court and Town. And then again, so great a number of able [bodied] divines might be a recruit to our fleet and armies.
Page 245 - When I reflect on this, I cannot conceive you to be human creatures, but a sort of species hardly a degree above a monkey ; who has more diverting tricks than any of you, is an animal less mischievous and expensive, might in time be a tolerable critic in velvet and brocade, and, for aught I know, would equally become them...

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