The History of England, from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688, Volume 8

Front Cover

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 295 - That king James II, having endeavored to subvert the constitution of the kingdom by breaking the original contract between king and people, and...
Page 232 - ... deserted France ; and exported, together with immense sums of money, those arts and manufactures which had chiefly tended to enrich that kingdom.
Page 12 - I, AB, do declare, that it is not lawful, upon any pretence whatsoever, to take arms against the king : and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person, or against those that are commissioned by him...
Page 8 - who is willing to be the man of his people, is the greatest king in the world, but if he wishes to be more, by heaven he is nothing at all!
Page 187 - As he was the most popular among his own party, so was he ever the least obnoxious to the opposite faction ; and his melancholy fate united every heart sensible of humanity in a tender compassion for him. Without the...
Page 31 - Instead of granting the supply, they voted an address, wherein they "besought his majesty to enter into a league, offensive and defensive, with the states general of the United Provinces, against the growth and power of the French king, and for the preservation of the Spanish Netherlands; and to make such other alliances with the confederates as should appear fit and useful to that end.
Page 121 - TORYj by which, and sometimes without any material difference, this island has been so long divided. The court party reproached their antagonists with their affinity to the fanatical conventiclers in Scotland, who were known by the name of Whigs : the country party found a resemblance between the courtiers and the popish banditti in Ireland, to whom the appellation of Tory was affixed.
Page 103 - ... for greater distances; every prisoner must be indicted the first term after his commitment, and brought to trial in the subsequent term. And no man, after being enlarged by order of the court, can be recommitted for the same offence.
Page 154 - the two parties, actuated by mutual rage, but cooped up within the narrow limits of the law, levelled with poisoned daggers the most deadly blows against each other's breast, and buried in their factious divisions all regard to truth, honour, and humanity.
Page 157 - Having spoken of what the lord-lieutenant has done; I presume with the same truth to tell your lordships what he has not done. He never advised the breaking of the triple league— he never advised the shutting up of the exchequer — he never advised the declaration for a toleration — he never advised the falling out with the Dutch and the joining with France— he was not the author of that most excellent position, Delenda est Carthago, that Holland, a Protestant country, should, contrary to...

Bibliographic information