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John BADOLLET,
JOHN BENEFIEL,

Delegates in Convention from the JNO. JOHNSON,

County of Knox.
WM. POLKE,
B. PARKE,
CHARLES POLKE, Delegate from the County of Perry.
DANN LYNN, Delegate from the County of Posey.
WILLIAM COTTON, Delegate from the County of Switzerland.
JOHN DE PAUW,
WILLIAM GRAHAM,
WILLIAM LOWE,
SAMUEL MILROY,
ROBERT MCINTIRE,

PATRICK BEARD,
JEREMIAH Cox,
Hugh CULL,
Joseph HOLEMAN.

Attest,
WILLIAM HENDRICKS, Secretary.

47. Reservation of Salt Springs and The Seminary Township (June 19, 1816).

(Convention Journal, 36.] Resolved, That Jonathan Lindley, Benjamin Parke, and James Noble, be appointed to designate to the Register of the Land Office at Vincennes, or to the Register of the Land Office at Jeffersonville, a township the most proper to be reserved for the state, for the use of a seminary of learning, and such lan Is as may be necessary to be reserved for the use of sal, springs; and thać they request the Register of the Land Office, and receiver of public money, in the district in which such township or land shall respectively lay, to request the President to reserve the same for the purpose aforesaid.

48.

Transmission of Ordinance to President and Congress (June 27, 1816).

[Convention Journal, 66.]

Ordered, That three copies of the ordinance relative to the acceptance of the propositions of Congress, and the stipulations on the part of this convention, be made out by the secretary; that the same be signed by the president and attested by the secretary; and by the president forwarded, one copy to the president of the United States, one copy to the president of the senate, and another copy to the speaker of the house of representatives.82

49. Transmission of Constitution to President and Congress (June 28, 1816).

(Convention Journal, 68.) Resolved, That the president of this convention do forward one printed copy of the constitution to the president of the United States, one to the president of the senate, and one to the speaker of the house of representatives of congress.

50. Printing and Distribution of Constitution and Journals (June

28 and 29, 1816).

(Convention Journal, 67.) Resolved, That this convention recommend to the early attention of the first general assembly of the State of Indiana, the necessity of making appropriations to pay for the printing of the journals of the convention, and constitution of the state.83

(Convention Journal, 67.) Resolved, That the committee appointed to contract for printing the constitution and journals of this convention, be authorised to have them, when printed, stitched and forwarded to the several counties, to wit: To each member of this convention, eleven copies; to each of the secretaries, two copies; and the residue to be lodged in the secretary's office, for the use of the state.

(Convention Journal, 68.] Resolved, That there shall be two complete copies of the constitution of Indiana, one of which shall be lodged with the president of the convention, to be kept by him until the meeting of the first general assembly, at which time the constitution shall be laid before them, and to be disposed of in such manner as they may direct.84

82.

83.

On January 9, 1817, the President of the United States Senate laid before the Senate a letter from Jonathan Jennings, the president of the Convention, with a copy of the Indiana Constitution. (Annals, 14th Congress, 2d Session, 55.)

The first General Assembly appropriated $200 to pay Mann Butler for printing and stitching the Constitution and Journals. (Laws, 1st Session, 239.) On December 15, 1817, a communication from Mann Butler, concerning the printing and binding of the Constitution and the Journals was presented to the House and referred to the Ways and Means Committee for consideration; this Committee, on December 30, reported that $200 had already been paid for this work and that the claim ought not to be paid again, a conclusion in which the House concurred. (House Journal, 2d Session, 54 and 104.) At the 3d session a similar claim was before the House and was again rejected. (House Journal, 3d Session, 165 and 205.)

[Convention Journal, 69.] Resolved, That Messrs. James Lemon and Robert A. New, be appointed as a committee to superintend the printing of the constitution of the State of Indiana; and that they report to the first general assembly.85

51. Compensation of Officers of Convention (June 28, 1816).

(Convention Journal, 67.)

Resolved, That there be allowed to the secretary of this convention, the sum of three dollars and fifty cents per day; to the assistant secretaries each, three dollars and fifty cents per day; to the door keeper, the sum of one dollar and fifty cents per day; and to the assistant door keeper, one dollar and fifty cents per day, for their services respectively, during their attendance on this convention, and that the general assembly shall provide by law for the payment of the said officers, respectively; which services shall be certified by the president of this convention.86

52. Harrison County Library (June 28, 1816).

(Convention Journal, 68.]

Resolved, That it be recommended to the general assembly of the State of Indiana, to appropriate the money voluntarily given by the citizens of Harrison county to the state, to the purchase of books for a library for the use of the legislature and other officers of government; and that the said general assembly will, from time to time, make such other appropriations for the increase of said library, as they may deem necessary.

53. Slavery and Exemption from Military Service (June 13, 1816).

The only important petitions presented to the Convention by the citizens of the territory were submitted on June 13, by the inhabitants of Wayne county, recommending constitutional provisions prohibiting the introduction of slavery, and granting the Quakers exemption from military duty in time of peace. The former was referred to the Committee on General Provisions, and the latter to the Committee on Military Affairs.

84. On November 11, 1816, at the first session, the Governor delivered a copy of the Constitution to the Senate and the Senate ordered this copy deposited with the Secretary of State for safe-keeping. (Senate Journal, 1st Session, 20.)

85. The report of Messrs. Lemon and New was made to the House at the ist. Session on December 28, 1816. (House Journal, 1st Session, 105.)

86. By an act of December 27, 1816, the secretaries were allowed $3.50 per day and the Door-keepers $2.00 per day, (Laws, 1st Session, 239.)

(Convention Journal, 19.]

Ordered, That so much of said memorial as relates to said society of friends, be referred to the Committee on Military Affairs; and that so much of said memorial as relates to the subject of slavery, be referred to the Committee relative to General Provisions.

54. Official Notice of First Election in State of Indiana (June 29,

1816). In conformity with the provisions of the Constitution, Jonathan Jennings, the President of the Convention issued the following official notice to the sheriffs of the several counties of the State authorizing and requiring them to give due notice of the first state election to be held on the first Monday in August, 1816.

(Western Sun, July 6, 1816.)

THE STATE OF INDIANA
To the Sheriff of Knox county, Greeting:

Whereas the convention of the said state of Indiana, by the 8th section of the 12th article of the Constitution of the said state, did order and direct that the president of the said convention, should issue writs of election to the sheriffs of the respective counties in the said state of Indiana, requiring and commanding the said sheriffs to proceed on the first Monday in August next, to the election of the various officers in the said section specified.

Now, therefore, know ye, that I, Jonathan Jennings, President of the said convention, do hereby require and command you, that you proceed to notify according to law, the qualified electors within your bailiwick, that they meet at the usual places of holding elections within the said county, on the first Monday in August next, and do then and there on the said day, proceed agreeably to the existing laws of the territory, to elect one Governor, one Lieutenant Governor, one Representative to represent the said state in the Congress of the United States; one Senator and three representatives, to represent the said county of Knox in the General Assembly of the said state; one Sheriff and one Coroner, for the said county of Knox, and make return of the said election as the law directs, enclosed and sealed up, directed to the speaker of the House of Representatives of the said state at Corydon; herein fail not.—Given under my hand and seal this 29th day of June A.D. 1816.

JONATHAN JENNINGS, President of the Convention.

55. Official Election Notice in Knox County (July 4, 1816).

In compliance with the order issued by Jonathan Jennings, President of the Convention, the Sheriff of Knox county issued the following election notice to the voters of Knox county on July 4, 1816.

(Western Sun, July 6, 1816.) State of Indiana, Knox County.

By virtue of a writ of election to me directed by Jonathan Jennings, President of the Convention, I do hereby give notice that an election will be holden on the first Monday in August next in the several townships throughout this county at their respective appointed places—the election to be holden under the Inspector, Judges and Clerks appointed and chosen for that purpose for the present year, agreeably to the now existing laws of the territory for one Governor, one Lieutenant Governor, one Representative to represent the state in the Congress of the U. States; one Senator and three Representatives to represent this county in the State Legislature; one Sheriff and one Coroner, for the said county of Knox;—at which time and places, the Inspector, Judges, and Clerks aforesaid of each Township are hereby required to attend.

B. V. BECKES, July 4, 1816.

Sheriff of Knox County.

56. Formal Admission of Indiana to Union (December 11, 1816).

By the adoption of the Ordinance accepting the proposals of Congress and the framing and adoption of the Constitution, the Territory of Indiana had fully complied with all the requirements imposed upon her by the Enabling Act. Three things were necessary to procure her full admission to the Union and to enable her to participate fully in all the functions exercised by the other states. The first of these was a formal admission to the Union by act of Congress; the second was the admission of her senators and representatives to their respective houses; and, since the year 1816 was a presidential year, the third was the recognition of her electors. William Hendricks, the representative to the Lower House, encountered no opposition. He was sworn into office on December 2, 1816, the day on which Congress convened. The resolution prescribing the manner of electing senators was adopted by the General Assembly of the State on November 8, 1816 (Laws, 1st Session, 1816, 249), and the election of James Noble and Waller Taylor took place

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