The Poetical Works of Thomas Chatterton: Acknowledged poems. Chatterton's will. Miscellaneous prose works

Front Cover
W. P. Grant, 1842

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 621 - Thy goodness love, thy justice fear! If in this bosom aught but Thee Encroaching sought a boundless sway, Omniscience could the danger see, And Mercy look the cause away. Then, why, my soul, dost thou complain ? Why drooping seek the dark recess ? Shake off the melancholy chain, For God created all to bless. But ah ! my breast is human still ; The rising sigh, the falling tear, My languid vitals' feeble rill, The sickness of my soul declare.
Page 607 - Rendered almost word for word without Rhyme according to the Latin Measure, as near as the Language will permit. WHAT slender Youth bedew'd with liquid odours Courts thee on Roses in some pleasant Cave, Pyrrha for whom bind'st thou In wreaths thy golden Hair, Plain in thy neatness?
Page 608 - WHAT slender Youth bedew'd with liquid odours Courts thee on Roses in some pleasant Cave, Pyrrha for whom bind'st thou In wreaths thy golden Hair, Plain in thy neatness? O how oft shall he On Faith and changed Gods complain : and Seas Rough with black winds and storms Unwonted shall admire : Who now enjoys thee credulous, all Gold, Who always vacant, always amiable Hopes thee ; of flattering gales Unmindful. Hapless they To whom thou untried seem'st fair. Me in my vow'd Picture the sacred wall declares...
Page 619 - O God, whose thunder shakes the sky, Whose eye this atom globe surveys ; To Thee, my only rock, I fly, Thy mercy in thy justice praise. The mystic mazes of thy will, The shadows of celestial light, Are past the power of human skill — But what the Eternal acts is right...
Page 710 - I am settled, and in such a settlement as I would desire. I get four guineas a month by one Magazine: shall engage to write a History of England, and other pieces, which will more than double that sum.
Page 324 - Impell'd by his eternal Love He left his Palaces above To cheer our gloomy Sky How shall we celebrate the day, When God appeared in mortal clay, The mark of worldly scorn ; When the Archangel's heavenly Lays, Attempted the Redeemer's Praise And hail'd Salvation's Morn ! A Humble Form the Godhead wore, The Pains of Poverty he bore, To gaudy Pomp unknown : Tho' in a human walk he trod Still was the Man Almighty God In Glory all his own.
Page 395 - The inequality of Chatterton's various productions may be compared to the disproportions of the ungrown giant. His works had nothing of the definite neatness of that precocious talent which stops short in early maturity His thirst for knowledge was that of a being taught by instinct to lay up materials for the exercise of great and undeveloped powers. Even in his...
Page 624 - To Barrett next, he has my thanks sincere, For all the little knowledge I had here. But what was knowledge ? Could it here succeed When scarcely twenty in the town can read ? Could knowledge bring in interest to maintain The wild expenses of a Poet's brain ; Disinterested Burgum never meant To take my knowledge for his gain per cent. When wildly...
Page 718 - But I have engaged to live with a gentleman, the brother of a Lord, (a Scotch one indeed,) who is going to advance pretty deeply into the bookselling branches ; I shall have...
Page 711 - Bristol an eternal fund of scandal, is here only introduced as a subject of taste ; if a man dresses well, he has taste ; if careless, he has his own reasons for so doing, and is prudent. Need I remind you of the contrast ? The poverty of authors is a common observation, but not always a true one. No author can be poor who understands the arts of booksellers. AVithout this necessary knowledge, the greatest genius may starve ; and •with it, the greatest dunce live in splendour. This knowledge I...

Bibliographic information