Page images
PDF
EPUB

MANUAL OF

ENGLISH LITERATURE:

A Tert-Book for Schools and (ileges

.

BY

JOHN S. HART, LL.D.,

TE PROFESSOR OF RHETORIC AND OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN
THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY, FORMERLY PRINCIPAL OF THE NEW JERSEY
STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, AUTHOR OF A SERIES OF TEXT-BOOKS

ON THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE, ETC., ETC.

[graphic][merged small][ocr errors]

PHILADELPHIA:
ELDREDGE & BROTHER,

No. 17 North Seve: th Street.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

PORK

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1872, by

ELDREDGE & BROTHER, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.

J. FAGAN & SON,
ELECTROTY PERS, PHILAD'A.

PREFACE.

THIS work is intended to serve the double purpose of a Text-book

and a book of reference. As a Text-book, the whole of it should be read by the student, but that part only which is in the larger type should be made the subject of recitation. By adhering to this rule, the student, even with the very limited time given to the pursuit in our institutions of learning, will be able without difficulty to compass the whole subject of English Literature, in all its departments, and, at the same time, will learn where to look for those minor details which, in the course of his studies, form a frequent subject of inquiry, but with which it is not necessary or expedient, in ordinary cases, to burden the memory.

As a book of reference, the amount of valuable information which the work contains will be found large beyond precedent in any manual of instruction that exists in the language. The facts here collected and condensed, if spread out in the usual form, would fill two or three octavo volumes. The itertes which make up this large aggregate have the advantage of being arranged in systematic order and in their appropriate historital conrertion. At the same time, by means of a copious verbal. Index.•each ftem may be referred to as readily as if the whole wese in the form of a dictionary.

It will be obvious, from the barest inspection of the volume, that the subject has not been considered in that restricted view which has been too much the wont in works of this kind. The Literature of a people contains something more, surely, than poetry, plays, and romances.

« PreviousContinue »