Vick's Monthly Magazine ..., Volume 11

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J. Vick., 1888 - Floriculture

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Page 172 - Not a flower But shows some touch, in freckle, streak, or stain, \ Of his unrivalled pencil. He inspires Their balmy odours, and imparts their hues, And bathes their eyes with nectar, and includes, In grains as countless as the seaside sands, The forms, with which he sprinkles all the earth.
Page 287 - NOT to myself alone," The little opening flower transported cries, — " Not to myself alone I bud and bloom ; With fragrant breath the breezes I perfume, And gladden all things with my rainbow dyes. The bee comes sipping, every eventide, His dainty fill; The butterfly within my cup doth hide From threatening ill."
Page 303 - FLOWER in the crannied wall, I pluck you out of the crannies, I hold you here, root and all, in my hand, Little flower — but if I could understand What you are, root and all, and all in all, I should know what God and man is.
Page 131 - Commissioner, or other chief officers having the general oversight of the public schools in each city or district, such exercises as shall tend to encourage the planting, protection and preservation of trees and shrubs, and an acquaintance with the best methods to be adopted to accomplish such results.
Page 319 - Report on the Experiments made in 1887, in the Treatment of the Downy Mildew and the Black Rot of the Grape Vine, with a chapter on the apparatus for applying remedies for these diseases.
Page 168 - ... as my limited experience goes. If a medical man understands how to employ hypnotism as a therapeutic agency, I think it safe to predict he will never find any symptoms follow his treatment to warrant such a collection of threatening adjectives. I have not yet met with any such results, and prefer to " speak that I do know, and testify that I have seen," rather than accept the mere ipse dixit of any man who cannot claim to teach us from personal observation.
Page 287 - This work, in two substantial volumes, has been written, the author says, in the interest of persons fond of rural affairs, and of students of agriculture. It makes no special appeal to chemists or to students of chemistry. It must not be supposed, however, from this modest statement, that Mr.
Page 131 - State, to assemble the scholars in their charge on that day in the school building, or elsewhere, as they may deem proper, and to provide for and conduct, under the general supervision of the city superintendent or the school commissioner, or other chief officers having the general oversight of the public schools in each city or district, such exercises as shall tend to encourage the planting, protection and preservation of trees and shrubs, and an acquaintance with the best methods to...
Page 243 - The fruit having thus been carefully prepared, is put in a basket, or a bucket with a perforated bottom, and immersed in boiling water. The object of this is to dilute and extract the juice of the fruit. The length of time the fruit is immersed is the most important part of the process. If left too long, it is overcooked and becomes soft; if not immersed long enough, the juice is not sufficiently extracted, which prevents a perfect absorption of the sugar. After the fruit has been thus scalded and...
Page 243 - The process is quite simple. The theory is to extract the juice from the fruit and replace it with sugar syrup, which, upon hardening, preserves the fruit from decay and at the same time retains the natural shape of the fruit. All kinds of fruit are capable of being preserved under this process. Though the method is very simple, there is a certain skill required that is acquired only by practice.

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