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trian never commences a journey with new shoes, but with a pair that have already conformed to the shape of the feet. Cotton stock ings cut the feet to pieces on a long walk; in their place, thick knit worsted socks ought invariably to be worn. Gaiters are chiefly useful in wet weather to keep the socks clean; at other times they have only the effect of heating the ankles. It is advisable to travel in cloth trowsers, not in linen, which afford no protection against rain or changes of temperature in mountaiu regions. A frock-coat is better than a shooting-jacket, which though well enough in remote places, is strange, and will attract notice in the streets of a foreign town.

A very admirable article in a traveller's wardrobe is a Blouse (Kittel in German), somewhat resembliny a ploughman's smock-frock in England, but by no means confined to the lower orders abroad, as it is a common travelling costume of nobles, gentles, and peasants. It may be worn either over the usual dress, to keep it clean and free from dust, or it may be substituted for the coat in hot weather. In either case it is very serviceable. This kind of garment may be purchased ready-made in any German town. The best colour is brown; blue is usually worn by agricultural labourers only. A knapsack may be purchased at a much cheaper rate abroad, and on a much better plan than those made in England. Portmanteaus are better in England than any where else. A Mackintosh cloak is almost indispensable, and it is difficult to procure one abroad ; few presents would be more acceptable to a foreign friend than such a cloak.

A flask, to hold brandy and kirschwasser, is necessary on mountain excursions: it should be remembered, however, that spirits ought to be resorted to less as a restorative than as a protection against cold and wet, and to mix with water, which ought never to be drunk cold or unmixed during a walk. The best restorative is tea, and as there are many parts of the Alps in which this luxury is hard to find, it is advisable to take a pound or half a pound from England.

Carey, Optician, 181, Strand, makes excellent pocket telescopes, about four inches long, combining, with a small size, considerable power and an extensive range.

Berry's patent inkstands and fire-boxes are much to be recommended for their portability.

A stout leather or canvass bag, to hold silver crown pieces and dollars; -cards, or pieces of parchment, for writing directions for the baggage (the managers of public conveyances abroad often insist upon each package being addressed, before they will take charge of it) ;-and one or two leather straps, to keep together small parcels, will be found

very useful.

h. LIST OF STEAM-BOATS FROM ENGLAND TO THE CONTINENT. *** The Steamers marked with an asterisk * belong to the General Steam Navigation Company,—berths may be secured in them, and all information may be obtained respecting them, at the offices, 69, Lombard Street, and 37, Regent Circus, Piccadilly. Passengers are requested to have all the packages composing their baggage distinctly marked with their names, and to take the

soever.

TO FRANCE.

TO BELGIUM,

*

whole on board with them. Baggage is not subject to examination on quitting London, but remains in the custody and under the control of the Persons to whom it belongs, and the Company is not liable for any damage or loss of it, nor fur unavoidable delays or accidents, nor Sea Risks of any kind what.

Carriages, Horses, and Baggage, being the bonâ fide Property of Passengers from Foreign Ports, are landed free of expense in London. Carriages and Horses, being the bonâ fide Property of Passengers going to Foreign Ports, shipped free of expense in London. Carriages (properly directed) and Horses for Embarkation from London, must be sent in charge of proper persons to Custom-house Quay, Lower Thames-street, by twelve o'clock on the day previous to the departure of the Packets.

returning Wednesday and Saturday. *London to Calais, three times a -Chief Cabin, £2 2s. ; Fore Cabin, week, returning three times.-Fares, £1 158.; Coach, £6 ; Chariot, £5.2 Chief Cabin, £1 ; second do. 178. Lonilon to Rotterdam. The Ba 6d.; carriage, £4 4s.

tavier, every Sunday. * London to Boulogne, three times a week, alternately with the Calais Hull to Rotterdam, once a week. boat.—Fares, same as to Calais.

Dover to Calais, Daily, to and fro. -Fare, 10s.

* London to Antwerp, every SunDover to Boulogne, do.

day and Thursday; returning every * Brighton to Dieppe, twice a week, Sunday and Wednesday. - Fare, Saturday and · Wednesday; return- same as to Rotterdam. iny Monday and Thursday: -Fares, London to Antwerp. The Victoria Chief Cabin, £l s. ; second do. 178. ;

every Sunday at Noon ; returning carriages, £1 ls. per wheel.

every Wednesday. *Brighton lo Havre, twice a week,

* London to Ostend, every SaturSunday aud Thursday; returning day ; returning every Tuesday, Tuesday and Friday.— Fares, same Fares, Chief Cabin, £1 10s.; Fore as to Havre.

Cabin, £1 58.; four-wheel carriages, Southampton to Havre, twice a

£4 48. week, to and fro.

Dovor to Ostend, four times a Southampton to Granville and St.

week. Malo, once a month. Dublin and Plymouth to Bordeaux,

* London to Hamburg, every Wedtwo or three times a month, in sum

nesday and Saturday ; returning every Wednesday and Saturday. – Fares, Chief Cabin, £5; Fore Ca

bin, £4; four-wheel carriage, £10; * London to Rotterdam, twice a two-wheel do., £6. week, Wednesday and Saturday ; 2. LANDING ON THE CONTINENT-CUSTOM-HOUSE-COMMISSIONAIRES.

When the steam boat reaches its destined port, the shore is usually beset by a crowd of clamorous agents from the different hotels, each vociferating the name and praises of that for which he is employed, stunning the distracted stranger with their cries, and nearly scratching his face with their proffered cards. The only mode of rescuing himself from these tormentors, who often beset him a dozen at a time, is to make up his mind beforehand to what hotel he will go, and to name

TO GERMANY,

mer.

TO HOLLAND.

it at once. The Agent or Commissionaire of the house then steps forward, and the rest fall back while he takes the new arrival under his protection, extricates him from the throng, and conducts him to his quarters.

In no other country but France is the person of the traveller liable to search from the Custom-house officers.

Passengers are not allowed to take their baggage on shore with them; it is conveyed at once from the vessel to the Custom-house by the Custom-house porters, who are answerable for the safety of every thing. The owner, instead of appearing himself to claim it, had better send his servant, or the Commissionaire of the Inn, intrusting him with the keys, in order that he may open and clear each package. This is his usual duty, and the Landlord of the Inn, who em. ploys him, is answerable for his honesty. Personal attendance at a Custom-house is by no means calculated to put the traveller in good humour. Indeed, it is a severe trial to his patience, first to wait till his turn comes, amidst the elbowing of porters, and next to look while his well-packed trunk is tossed over “with a cruel, hard-hearted sort of civility, which leaves nothing to complain of and everything to lament." Indeed the search into the baggage is often more severe in the presence of the traveller, which seems sometimes to give rise to a suspicion of smuggling. He that would keep his temper and does not grudge a fee of two francs to the Commissionaire, will intrust to him his keys,' and dismissing the care of his baggage from his thoughts, amuse himself for an hour or so, when he will probably find his effects conveyed to his chamber, very often not opened at all, generally only slightly examined.

If, however, the baggage contain any contraband articles, it is advisable to declare them beforehand, and to pay the duty.

“ Those who would travel with comfort should be particularly on their guard against rendering themselves liable to detention or penalty at the foreign custom-houses. They should avoid taking any. thing which is contraband, either for themselves or for their friends; for it too often happens that travellers on the Continent are meanly solicited to take those things for their friends who are abroad, which they dare not send by the public conveyance, thus rendering their travelling friends liable to penalty and punishment. This is more strikingly the case where they are requested to take letters, for which public conveyances are provided : in this case, they suffer their friends to run a great risk for the sake of saving the postage. Such conduct is most unpardon able."-—Brockedon.

The next service the Commissionaire will perform is, to obtain the signature of the police for the traveller's passport, so as to enable him to proceed on his journey. It is sometimes, however, necessary (in France for instance) to repair in person to the police office, to obtain a signature for the passport. The passport should be the traveller's first care, indeed, until it is visć he is, comparatively speaking, not a free agent.

k. A FEW SKELETON TOURS UPON THE CONTINENT,

WITH AN APPROXIMATE STATEMENT OF THE TIME REQUIRED TO TRAVE ROM

PLACE TO PLACE, AND OF THE DURATION OF THE HALTS TO BE MADE AT THE MOST REMARKABLE SPOTS.

** The first Column denotes the Hours or Days actually occupied in Tra

velling, not including stoppages at Night. The second Column gives the probable duration of the Halts to be made for sight-seeing. The brackets [ ] denote side excursions, which may be omitted if time require it.

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Hours in Days of

Travelling. Sojourn. Mechlin } .by

1 Brussels Srail-road 04 Waterloo

14
Namur or Huy
Liège

5
[Spa...

3 Aix-la-Chapelle 7

1 or 2
Cologne
[Altenberg and back 7 ]
Bonn and

4
Godesberg
[Lake of Laach

9
Coblenz

6
St. Goar

5
Bacharach
Bingen....

2 1
Rudesheim
Mayence
[Wiesbaden.

2 Frankfort,

4 Darmstadt

3 [Odenwald

2 ] Heidelberg

5 1 or 2 Carlsruhe.

6 Baden

5 Strasburg..

6 Freiburg

7 Schaffhausen..12 or 14

The Excursions through Switzer. land will be given in Vol. III. of the Handbook.

Return from Strasburg to London by steam, in 5 or 6 days.

..

B.-LONDON TO THE BORDERS OF

SWITZERLAND, THROUGH BELGIUM,
AND UP THE RHINE.

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C.--LONDON TO FRANKFORT.

F.- LONDON TO SALZBURG AND MU.

NICH, BY WURZBURG, Nurem-
BERG, AND THE DANUBE.

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Daye in Days at

Travelling. Halt. To Frankfort, ... 7 as in C. Wurzburg I or 11

1 Nuremberg

1 2 Ratisbon

1

1 Passau....

1 By the Danube to

2 1 Lintz..... (Hence to Vienna by the Danube is

21 days.) Traunfall and Gmunden

01} or 2 Salzburg Munich..

as in E. Heidelberg. England, by the Rhine as in B.

D.-LONDON TO Trieste,

Hours,

}

Ischel....

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G.- LONDON TO DRESDEN, THE Saxon SWITZERLAND,

AND BoHEMIAN BATHS.

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12 or

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E.-LONDON TO Munich, SALZBURG, AND VIENNA.

Days in Days of

Travelling. Sojourn. To Mayence.

14, as Heidelberg

1

in B. Heilbronn

1

17
Stuttgard.
Ulm.
Augsburg.

1 Munich

several 1

{ weeks. Salzburg ......... 11

4 or 5 Hallein

excurBerchtesgaden sions.

days. Ischel....

11 Traunsee and Fall 5 5 Lintz...

8

1 By Danube to

} Vienna

24

Days in

Travelling To Frankfurt.... 7 as in B,

Gelnhausen..
[Excursion to Baths of Brüc-

kenau 3 or 4 days.]
Eisenach
Gotha

42 hours from
Erfurth

Frankfort.
Weimar
Leipsig
Say 6f days.

several Dresden..

1

1 weeks. Saxon Switzerland, 3 or 4 days. Tæplitz

8 hrs. 1 Carlsbad

11

] Prague

15

3 Vienna

36 Or from Prague to Linz.

24 4s in F,

.

..

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