The Staple of News, Volumes 28-29

Front Cover
H. Holt, 1905 - Fathers and sons - 276 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 170 - He the half of life abuses, That sits watering with the Muses. Those dull girls no good can mean us ; Wine it is the milk of Venus,* And the poet's horse accounted : Ply it, and you all are mounted. 'Tis the true Phoebian liquor, Cheers the brains, makes wit the quicker.
Page 136 - It is more than this, the whole world's map, which you may here discern in its perfectest motion, justling and turning. It is a heap of stones and men, with a vast confusion of languages; and were the steeple not sanctified, nothing liker Babel.
Page 146 - A strange fish! Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
Page 211 - The marshalling of coat-armour, which was formerly the pride and study of all the best families in the kingdom, is now greatly disregarded; and has fallen into the hands of certain officers and attendants upon this court, called heralds...
Page 131 - ... whose play it is ; and by that quest of inquiry the law warrants you to avoid much mistaking. If you know not the author, you may rail against him, and peradventure so behave yourself, that you may enforce the author to know you.
Page 134 - ALL tenures being thus derived, or supposed to be derived, from the king, those that held immediately under him, in right of his crown and dignity, were called his tenants in capite...
Page xxxvi - Newes from Scotland : Declaring the damnable Life of Doctor Fian a notable Sorcerer...
Page 125 - But on the very rushes where the comedy is to dance, yea, and under the state of Cambyses himself, must our feathered estrich, like a piece of ordnance, be planted valiantly, because impudently, beating down the mews and hisses of the opposed rascality.
Page 219 - At either corner of this west end is, also of ancient building, a strong tower of stone, made for bell towers : the one of them, to wit, next to the palace, is at...
Page 128 - As when hee said in the person of Caesar, one speaking to him ; Caesar thou dost me wrong. Hee replyed : Caesar did never wrong, but with just cause and such like: which were ridiculous.

Bibliographic information