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Books Books 1 - 10 of 132 on No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality....
" No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva have equal rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, but... "
International Cases: Arbitrations and Incidents Illustrative of ... - Page 153
by Ellery Cory Stowell, Henry Fraser Munro - 1916
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The New-York Review, and Atheneum Magazine, Volume 1

William Cullen Bryant, Robert Charles Sands, Henry J. Anderson - American literature - 1825
...to be lost ? Each may renounce it foi its own people ; but can this renunciation affect others ? " No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all by the consent of all, can be devested only by consent ; and...
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The African Repository, Volume 1

African Americans - 1826
...right to he lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people; but can this renunciation affect others f No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged,...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all by the consent of all, can be divested only by consent ; and...
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Elements of International Law: With a Sketch of the History of the ..., Volume 1

Henry Wheaton - International law - 1836
...sanctioned by universal assent, every nation had an equal right to engage. No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent of all, could be divested only by consent; and...
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Enquiry Into the Validity of the British Claim to a Right of Visitation and ...

Henry Wheaton - Great Britain - 1842 - 151 pages
...sanctioned by universal consent, every nation had an equal right to engage. No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality...itself, but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent of all, could be divested only by consent ; and...
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Institutes of International Law, Volume 2

Richard Wildman - International law - 1849
...this renunciation effect others? No principle of public law is (n) 10 Wheaton, 120. more generally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations....rights. It results from this equality, that no one can rightly impose a rule upon another. Each legislates for itself, but its legislation can affect itself...
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Massachusetts Reports: Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme ..., Volume 61

Massachusetts. Supreme Judicial Court - Law reports, digests, etc - 1862
...this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged lhan the perfect equality of nations. Russia and Geneva...itself; but its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which is vested in all, by the consent of all, can be divested only by consent." " As...
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the american annual cyclopaedia

1863
...with its people and subject*, a* * legitimate trade sanctioned by the law of nations. The court say: No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality of nations. Bn»sia and Geneva have equal rights.' It results lr»« this equality that no one can rightfully im{X>*>...
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The American Annual Cyclopædia and Register of Important Events ...

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1863
...right to be lost ? Each may renounce it for its own people ; but can this renunciation affect others? No principle of general law is more universally acknowledged...rights. It results from this equality that no one can rightfullv impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself* but its legislation can operate on...
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Elements of International Law

Henry Wheaton - International law - 1866 - 749 pages
...sanctioned by universal assent, every nation had an equal right to engage. No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged, than the perfect equality...impose a rule on another. Each legislates for itself, hut its legislation can operate on itself alone. A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent...
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On International Reform

Frederic Seebohm - Commerce - 1871 - 147 pages
...Supreme Court of the United States adopted the same conclusion :— ' No principle of general law was more universally acknowledged than the perfect equality...that no one can rightfully impose a rule on another. ... A right, then, which was vested in all by the consent of all could be divested only by consent....
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