The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier, 1204-1760

Front Cover
University of California Press, Jul 31, 1996 - History - 359 pages
In all of the South Asian subcontinent, Bengal was the region most receptive to the Islamic faith. This area today is home to the world's second-largest Muslim ethnic population. How and why did such a large Muslim population emerge there? And how does such a religious conversion take place? Richard Eaton uses archaeological evidence, monuments, narrative histories, poetry, and Mughal administrative documents to trace the long historical encounter between Islamic and Indic civilizations.

Moving from the year 1204, when Persianized Turks from North India annexed the former Hindu states of the lower Ganges delta, to 1760, when the British East India Company rose to political dominance there, Eaton explores these moving frontiers, focusing especially on agrarian growth and religious change.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PART ONE BENGAL UNDER THE SULTANS
3
The Articulation of Political Authority
22
Early Sufis of the Delta
71
Theories and Protagonists
113
Theories of Islamization in Bengal
119
The Appearance of a Bengali Muslim Peasantry
129
PART TWO BENGAL UNDER THE MUGHALS
137
Mughal Culture and Its Diffusion
159
The Religious Gentry in Bakarganj
219
Summary
226
The Growth of Mosques and Shrines in Rural Chittagong
234
The Rise of Chittagongs Religious Gentry
248
The Religious Gentry of Sylhet
258
Summary
265
1O The Rooting of Islam in Bengal
268
Conclusion
305

The Place of Bengal in Mughal Culture
167
The Place of Islam in Mughal Culture
174
West Bengal The Integration of Imperial Authority
183
East Bengal Conquest and Culture Change
191
Charismatic Pioneers on the Agrarian Frontier
207
Mint Towns and Inscription Sites under Muslim
317
Principal Rulers of Bengal 12041757
323
Index
343
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1996)

Richard M. Eaton is Professor of History at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and the author of The Sufis of Bijapur (1978).

Bibliographic information