Manx Note Book, Volumes 1-2

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Douglas., 1885

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Page 142 - Directions from time to time, as you shall receive from us or any other your superior Officer, according to the Rules and Discipline of War ; in pursuance of the Trust hereby reposed in You.
Page 142 - Captain into your care and charge, and duly to exercise as well the officers as soldiers thereof in arms, and to use your best endeavours to keep them in good order and discipline ; and we do hereby command them to obey you as their...
Page 142 - Greeting. We, reposing especial Trust and Confidence in your Loyalty, Courage, and good Conduct, do by these Presents Constitute and Appoint you to be an Officer in Our Land Forces from the Twentieth day of March 1915.
Page 5 - This ardent love not only inspired the continental provinces, but the most distant islands and savage countries. The Welshman left his hunting ; the Scotch his fellowship with vermin ; the Dane his drinking party ; the Norwegian his raw fish.
Page 10 - ... the darkness of the night, raising itself by its own might higher and higher, till it stood triumphant on the arch of heaven, and then descended and sank down in its fiery glory into the dark abyss of the heaving and hissing sea. In the hymns of the Veda the poet still wonders whether the sun will rise again ; he asks how he can climb the vault of heaven ? why he does not fall back ? why there is no dust on his path ? And when the rays of the morning rouse him from sleep and call him back to...
Page 186 - ... be liable, at the discretion of the court by which he is tried, to a penalty not exceeding three hundred dollars, or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months.
Page 10 - Few nations only have preserved in their ancient poetry some remnants of the natural awe with which the earliest dwellers on the earth saw that brilliant being slowly rising from out the darkness of the night, raising itself by its own might higher and higher, till it stood triumphant on the arch of heaven, and then descended and sank down in its fiery glory into the dark abyss of the heaving and hissing sea.
Page 8 - Man," an assertion which we know to be false. There is nothing easier than to solve a difficulty by manufacturing evidence. Another says, " The three legs conjoined were used by Sicily in allusion to its three headlands or promontories, whence its name, Trinacria." But this also is set aside by the fact that the device is found on many early Greek coins of inland towns having no connection with Sicily. One antiquary suggests that Alexander adopted the three legs running, " because, as mentioned by...
Page 142 - George the Third, by the grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c., to our trusty and...

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