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THE

ANATOMY

ОР

MELANCHOLY,

WHAT IT IS, WITH ALL THE

KINDS, CAUSES, SYMPTOMES, PROGNOSTICS,

AND

SEVERAL CURES OF IT.

In Three Partitions.

WITH THEIR SEVERAL

SECTIONS, MEMBERS, AND SUBSECTIONS,
Philosophically, Medicinally, Historically opened and cut up.

BY

DEMOCRITUS JUNIOR.

WITH

A SATYRICALL PREFACE CONDUCING TO THE FOLLOWING DISCOURSE.

The Ninth Edition, corrected;

To which is now first prefixed,
AN ACCOUNT OF THE AUTHOR.

Omne tulit punctum, qui miscuit utile dulci.

VOL. II.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY J. CUNDEE, IVY-LANE,
FOR VERNOR AND HO0D; J. CUTHELL; J.SEWELL; J. WALKER:
LACKINGTON, ALLEN, AND CO. OTRIDGE AND SON;

AND OGILVY AND SON.

1800.

13 SET ;328

THE

SECOND PARTITION.

SECT. III.
MEMB. I. SUBSECT. I.

A Consolatory Digression, containing the Remedies of all

manner of discontents. RECAUSE in the precedent Section I have made mention

D of good counsel, comfortable speeches, perswasion, how necessarily they are required to the cure of a discontented or troubled mind, how present a remedy they yield, and many times a sole sufficient cure of themselves; I have thought fit in this following Section, a little to digress, (if at least it be to digress in this subject) to collect and glean a few remedies, and comfortable speeches out of our best Orators, Philosophers, Divines, and fathers of the Church, tending to this purpose I confess, inany have copiously written of this subject, Plato, Seneca, Plutarch, Xenophon, Epictetus, Theophrastus, Xenocrates, Crantor, Lucian, Boethius : and some of late, Sadoletus, Cardan, Budæus, Stella, Petrarch, Erasmus, besides Austin, Cyprian, Bernard, &c. And they so well, that as Hierome in like case said, si nostrum areret ingenium, deillorum posset fontibus irrigari, if our barren wits were dryed up, they might be copiously irrigated from those well-springs : And I shall but actum agere; yet because these tracts are not so obvious and common, I will Epitomize, and briefly insert some of their divine precepts, reducing their voluminous and vast Treatises to my small scale ; for it were otherwise impossible to bring so great vessels into so little a creek. And although (as Cardan said of his book de consol.) i I know before hand, this tract of mine many will contemn and reject; they that are fortunate, happy, and in flourishing estate, have no need of such consolatory speeches ; they that are miserable and

Lib. de lib. propriis. Hos libros scio multos spernere, nam felices his se non indigere putant, infelices ad solationem miseriæ non sufficere. Et tamen felicibus moderationem, dum inconstantiam humanæ felicitatis docent, præstant; infelices si omnia rectè æstimare velint, felices reddere possunt, YOL. II.

unhappy

unhappy, think them unsufficient to ease their grieved minds, and comfort their misery :" Yet I will go on; for this must needs do some good to such as are happy, to bring them to a moderation, and make them reflect and know themselves, by seeing the unconstancy of humane felicity, others misery: and to such as are distressed, if they will but attend and consider of this, it cannot choose but give some content and comfort. “k 'Tis true, no medicine can cure all diseases, some affections of the mind are altogether incurable ; yet these helps of Art, Physick, and Philosophy must not be contemned.” Arrianus and Plotinus are stiffe in the contrary opinion, that such precepts can do little good. Boethius himself cannot comfort in some cases, they will reject such speeches like bread of stones, Insana stultæ mentis hæc solatia.

Words adde no courage, (which * Catiline once said to his souldiers, “ a Captain's Oration doth not make a coward a valiant man:” And as Job † feelingly said to his friends, “you are but miserable comforters all.” . Tis to no purpose in that vulgar phrase to use a company of obsolete sentences, and familiar sayings : As | Plinius Secundus being now sorrowful and heavy for the departure of his dear friend, Cornelius Rufus a Roman Senator, wrote to his fellow Tiro in like case, adhibe solutia, sed nova aliqua, sed fortia, que audierim nunquam, legerim nunquam : nam quce audivi, quæ legi omnia, tanto dolore superantur, either say something that I never read nor heard of before, or else hold thy peace. Most men will here except, trivial consolations, ordinary speeches, and known perswasions in this behalf will be of small force ; what can any man say that hath not been said ? To what end are such parænetical discourses? you may as soon remove mount Caucasus, as alter some men's affections. Yet sure I think they cannot choose but do some good, and comfort and ease a little, though it be the same again, I will say it, and upon that hope I will adventure. 'Non meus hic sermo, tis not my speech this, but of Seneca, Plutarch, Epictetus, Austin, Bernard, Christ and his Apostles. If I make nothing, as m Mountaigne said in like case, I will mar nothing; tis not my doctrine but by study, I hope I shall do no body wrong to speak what I think, and deserve not blame in imparting my mind. If it be not for thy ease, it may for mine own; so Tully, Cardan, and Boethius wrote de consol. as well to help themselves as others; be it as it may, I will essa y.

* Nullum medicamentum omnes sanare potest ; sunt affectus animi qui prorsus sunt insanabiles ? non tamen artis opus spcrni debet, aut medicinæ, aut philosophiæ. * Salust. Verba virtutem non addunt, nec imperatoris oratio facitè timido fortem. + Job cap. 16. Epist. 13. lib. 1. " Hor. * Lib. 2. Essays cap. 6.

Discontents and grievances are either generall or particular; generall are wars, plagues, dearths, famine, fires, inundations, unseasonable weather, Epidemical diseases which afflict whole kingdoms, Territories, Cities : or peculiar to private men,

as cares, crosses, losses, death of friends, poverty, want, sickness, orbities, injuries, abuses, &c. Generally all discontent, homines quatimur fortune salo. No condition free, quisg; suos patimur manes. Even in the midst of our mirth and jollity, there is some grudging, some complaint; as P he saith, our whole life is a Glucupicron, a bitter sweet passion, hony and gall mixt together, we are all miserable and discontent, who can deny it? If all, and that it be a common calamity, an inevitable necessity, all distressed, then as Cardan infers, “9 who art thou that hopest to go free? Why dost thou not grieve thou art a mortall man, and not governor of the world ?" Ferre quam sortem patiuntur omnes, Nemo recuset, If it he common to all, why should one man be more disquieted then another?” If thou alone wert distressed, it were indeed more irksome, and less to be indured; but when the calamity is common, comfort thy self with this, thou hast more fellows, Solamen miseris socios habuisse doloris; 'tis not thy sole case, and why shouldst thou be so impatient ? "s I, but alas we are more miserable than others, what shall we do? Besides private miseries, we live in perpetuall fear, and danger of common enemies, we have Bellona's whips, and pittifull out-cryes, for Epithalamiums; for pleasant musick, that fearfull noise of Ordnance, Drums, and warlike Trumpets still sounding in our eares; instead of nuptiall Torches, we have firing of Towns, and Cities; for triumphs, lamentations ; for joy, tears. So it is, and so it was, and so it ever will be. He that refuseth to see and hear, to suffer this, is not fit to live in this world, and knows not the common condition of all men, to whom so long as they live, with a reciprocall course, joyes and sorrows are

• Alium paupertas, alium orbitas, hunc morbi, illum timor, alium injuriæ, hunc insidiæ, illum uxor, filii distrahunt, Cardan. Boethius I. 1. mct. 5. P Apuleius 4. florid. Nihil homini tam prosperè datum divinitus, quin ei ada mixtum sit aliquid difficultatis, in amplissimâ quâq; lætitiâ subest quædam querimonia, conjugatione quâdam mellis & sellis. 4 Si omnes premantur, quis tu es qui solus evadere cupis ab eâ lege quæ neminem præterit? cur te non mortalem factum & universi orbis regem fieri non doles ? Puteanus ep. 75. Neq; cuiquam præcipuc dolendum eo quod accidit universis. • Lor. chan. Gallobelgicus lib. 3. Anno 1598. de Belgis. Sed eheu inquis euge quid agemus! ubi pro Epithalamio Bellonæ flagellum, pro musica harmoniâ terribi. lum littorum & tubarum audias clangorem, pro tædis nuptialibus, villarum, pa. gorum, arbium videas incendia; ubi pro jubilo lamenta, pro risu fletus aérem complent. Ita est profccto, & quisquis hæc videre abnuis, huic seculi parum aptus es, aut potius nostrorum omnium conditionem ignoras, quibus reciproco quodam aexu læta tristibus, tristia færis invicem succedant.

B 2

annexed,

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