The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it Is, with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptomes, Prognostics, ... In Three Partitions. ... By Democritus Junior. With a Satyricall Preface ... The Ninth Edition, Corrected; to which is Now First Prefixed, an Account of the Author. ...

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J. Cundee, 1800

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Page 486 - By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God, and keep His commandments.
Page 400 - It lies not in our power to love, or hate, For will in us is over-rul'd by fate. When two are stript, long ere the course begin, We wish that one should lose, the other win; And one especially do we affect Of two gold ingots, like in each respect. The reason no man knows; let it suffice, What we behold is censur'd by our eyes.
Page 196 - Cenchreas and Corinth, met such a phantasm in the habit of a fair gentlewoman, which taking him by the hand, carried him home to her house, in the suburbs of Corinth, and told him she was a Phoenician by birth, and if he would tarry with her, he should hear her sing and play, and drink such wine as never any drank, and no man should molest him; but she, being fair and lovely, would live and die with him, that was fair and lovely to behold.
Page 543 - There is nothing better for a man, than that he should eat and drink, and that he should make his soul enjoy good in his labor.
Page 197 - Tantalus' gold, described by Homer, no substance, but mere illusions. When she saw herself descried, she wept, and desired Apollonius to be silent, but he would not be moved, and thereupon she, plate, house, and all that was in it, vanished in an instant : many thousands took notice of this fact, for it was done in the midst of Greece.
Page 4 - Fcelix, the Roman Consul, told that insulting Coriolanus, drunk with his good fortunes, look not for that success thou hast hitherto had. It never yet happened to any man since the beginning of the world, nor ever will, to have all things according to his desire, or to whom fortune was never opposite and adverse.
Page 549 - REASONING WITH THEMSELVES, BUT not aright, Our life is short and tedious, and in the death of a man there is no remedy: neither was there any man known to have returned from the grave. For we are born at all adventure: and we shall be hereafter as though we had never been: for the breath in our nostrils is as smoke, and a little spark in the moving of our heart...
Page 283 - And as much pity is to be taken of a woman weeping, as of a goose going barefoot.
Page 6 - Every man knows his own, but not others' defects and miseries ; and 'tis the nature of all men still to reflect upon themselves, their own misfortunes, not to examine or consider other men's, not to confer themselves with others : to recount their miseries, but not their good gifts, fortunes, benefits, which they have, to ruminate on their adversity, but not once to think on their prosperity, not what they have, but what they want : to look still on them that go before, but not on those infinite...
Page 176 - For the merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver, and the gain thereof than fine gold. She is more precious than rubies : and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her.

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