Maritime law: Correspondence relative to neutral rights between the government of the United States and the powers represented in the congress at Paris. 1856

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A.O.P. Nicholson, printer, 1856 - Declaration of Paris - 18 pages
 

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Page 8 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war ; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 4 - Convinced that the maxims which they now proclaim cannot but be received with gratitude by the whole world, the undersigned plenipotentiaries doubt not that the efforts of their governments to obtain the general adoption thereof will be crowned with full success. The present declaration is not and shall not be binding, except between those powers who have acceded, or shall accede, to it.
Page 4 - Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective, that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the* coast of the enemy. " The governments of the undersigned Plenipotentiaries engage to bring the present declaration to the knowledge of the States which have not taken part in the Congress of Paris, and to invite them to accede to it.
Page 3 - That it is consequently advantageous to establish a uniform doctrine on so important a point; That the Plenipotentiaries assembled in Congress at Paris cannot better respond to the intentions by which their Governments are animated, than by seeking to introduce into international relations fixed principles in this respect...
Page 3 - ... who had agreed, and those who should afterwards accede to it, should, after the adoption of the same, enter into no arrangement on the application of maritime law in time of war without stipulating for a strict observance of the four points resolved by the declaration. The...
Page 7 - Free ships make free goods; that is to say, that the effects or goods belonging to subjects or citizens of a power or State at war are free from capture or confiscation when found on board of neutral vessels, with the exception of articles contraband of war. 2. That the property of neutrals on board an enemy's vessel is not subject to confiscation unless the same be contraband of war.
Page 3 - That maritime law, in time of war, has long been the subject of deplorable disputes; That the uncertainty of the law and of the duties in such a matter Y gives rise to differences of opinion between neutrals and belligerents which may occasion serious difficulties, and even conflicts...
Page 11 - The proposal to surrender the right to employ privateers is professedly founded upon the principle that private property of unoffending non-combatants, though enemies, should be exempt from the ravages of war ; but the proposed surrender goes but little way in carrying out that principle, which equally requires that such private property should not be seized or molested by national shi^s of war.
Page 2 - The Secretary of State, to whom has been referred a resolution of the House of Representatives...
Page 4 - Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under the enemy's flag. 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective — that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.

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