Readings in Rabelais

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W. Blackwood and sons, 1883 - 382 pages

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Page 21 - ... they had done their minds. All their play was but in liberty, for they left off when they pleased, and that was commonly when they did sweat over all their body, or were otherwise weary. Then were they very well wiped and rubbed, shifted their shirts, and walking soberly, went to see if dinner was ready.
Page 69 - ... the nature of man to long after things forbidden, and to desire what is denied us. By this liberty they entered into a very laudable emulation, to do all of them what they saw did please one. If any of the gallants or ladies should say, Let us drink, they would all drink. If any one of them said, Let us play, they all played.
Page 59 - ... said Gargantua, the greatest loss of time that I know is to count the hours. What good comes of it? Nor can there be any greater dotage in the world than for one to guide and direct his courses by the sound of a bell, and not by his own judgment and discretion.
Page 29 - They went likewise to see the drawing of metals, or the casting of great ordnance ; how the lapidaries did work, as also the goldsmiths and cutters of precious stones.

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