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How long on Moi-lena shall we weep; or pour our tears in Ullin The mighty

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that have shone; we only hear the sound of their praise. But they were renowned in their day, the terror of other times. Thus

shall we pass , O warriors in the day of

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Ullin, my aged bard take the ship of the king. Carry Oscar to Selma of harps. Let the daughters of Morven weep. We shall fight in Erin for the race of fallen Cormac. The days of my years begin to fail : I feel the weakness of my arm. My fathers bend from their clouds, to receive their grey-haird son. But, before I go hence, one beam of fame shall rise : so shall my days end, as my years begun , in fame : my life shall be one stream of light to bards of other times.

Ullin rais'd his white sails: the wind of the south came forth. He bounded on the waves towards Selma.-(1) I remained in

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The night came rolling down. The light of an hundred oaks arose. Fingal sat beneath a tree. Old Althan (1) stood in the midst. He told the tale of fallen Cormac. Althan the son of Conachar, the friend of car-borne Cuchullin: he dwelt with Cormac in windy Temora, when Semo's son fought with generous Torlath.-The tale of Althan was mournful, and the tear was in his eye.

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(1) Althan , the son of Conachar , was the chief bard of Arth king of Ireland. After the death of Arth, Althan attended his son Cormac, and was present at his death. He had made his escape from Cairbar, by the means of Cathmor. and coming to Fingal, relared, as here, the death of his master Cormac.

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(3) Doira, the woody side of a mountain ; it is here a hill in the neighbourhood of Temora, ,

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(1) Arth or Artho, the father of Cormac king of Ireland. -

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I heard the king in filence. My tears began to flow. I hid them with my aged locks; but he perceived my grief.

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(1) Cuchullin is called the king of Tura from a castle of that name on the coast of Ulster, where he dwelt, before he undertook the management of the affairs of Ireland, in the minority of Cormac.

(1) The prophetic sound , mentioned in other poems, which the harps of the bards emitted before the death of a person worthy and renowned. It is here an omen of the death of Cormac, which, soon after, followed.

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