History of Europe from the Commencement of the French Revolution to the Restoration of the Bourbons in 1815, Volume 2

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Contents

Trial and execution of the Marquis de Favras
9
Division of France into departments and municipal establishments
10
Municipal regulations and elective franchise
11
Vast effects of these changes
12
General excitement in the provinces
13
Lowering of the elective franchise
14
Lasting effects of these changes
15
New hall of the Assembly and introduction of the guillotine
16
Inquiry at the court of Châtelet into the outrages of 5th and 6th October at Versailles
17
Excessive embarrassment of the finances
18
Argument of Talleyrand in favour of Church spoliation
19
Answer of the Abbé Maury and Sièyes ib 22 Confiscation of the property of the church
20
Reflections on this step
21
Leads to the sale of the church property and the issuing of assignats
22
And to the subdivision of land
23
The clergy vehemently resist
24
Only mode of resisting these evils
25
New modelling of the civil constitution of the church
26
Judicial establishment
27
Efforts of the clergy to dissolve the Assembly
28
Mirabeaus speech in reply
29
Discussion as to vesting right of making peace and war in the crown
30
Mirabeaus speech in favour of the crown on this point
31
Settlement on the crown
32
6
33
Military organisation
34
General establishment of national guards
36
And of armed pikemen in the towns
37
Fearful depreciation of assignats
38
Argument of the Abbé Maury and Talleyrand against their further issue ib 43 Mirabeaus argument in favour of the assignats
39
Their rapid fall
40
Preparations for a fête on the 14th July
41
Particulars of the fête ib 47 Accusation of the Duke of Orleans and Mirabeau
43
Noble speech of Cazalès on this occasion
44
Retirement of Necker ib 50 Change of ministry
45
Revolt at Metz and Nancy
46
Character of M de Bouillé
47
Great difficulties of de Bouillés situation
48
Bloody action there
49
Tumult in Paris and proceedings in the Assembly
50
Frightful disorders in different parts of France
51
New ecclesiastical oath Its disastrous effects
53
Reasons which led them to resist this oath
54
Remarkable speech and prophecy of Cazalès on this occasion ib 61 Noble conduct of the clergy in refusing the oath
55
Ruinous effects of this measure
56
Reply of Robespierre
57
Revolutionary law of inheritance
58
Departure for Rome of the Princesses Adelaide and Victoria
59
Continued emigration
60
Arrest of the royal princesses
61
Discussion concerning emigrants
63
Mirabeau joins the throne
64
His plan on its behalf
66
His death
67
His character
68
And funeral obsequies
69
Changed views of the literary men in Paris on the Revolution
70
Designs of the royal family to effect their escape
72
de Bouillés arrangements for the journey
77
The King reveals himself to the mayor who takes measures to arrest the party
78
He is forcibly detained till the aidesdecamp of Lafayette arrive
80
Consternation at Paris commissioners sent for the King and Barnave won to the royal cause
83
Return to Paris and barbarity of the people on the road
84
Universal consternation in Paris on this event
85
Proceedings in the Assembly
86
Return of the royal family to Paris
87
Views of the parties on the flight of the King
88
First open avowal of republican principles and new division of parties in the Assembly
89
The royal authority is suspended by a decree of the Assembly
90
Argument of Robespierre against the King ib 95 And of Barnave in reply
92
Revolt in the Champ de Mars
93
Vigorous measures of the Assembly Victory of Lafayette
94
But the Constitutionalists do not follow it up
95
Proposal to modify the constitution
96
Preparations at Paris for the escape of the royal family 74
97
The King reinvested with his power
98
Closing of the Assembly
99
Merits of the Constituent Assembly
100
And its errors and faults
101
Which were all committed in the face of their instructions
103
Vicious principle which led to all these disasters ib 107 Fatal creation of revolutionary interests
104
Proves the impossibility of extinguishing revolutionary passion by concession
105
Cause to which this was owing
106
When should resistance to revolution be made ?
107
Undue humanity and irresolution of the King
108
Treachery of the troops and emigration of the noblesse
109
CHAPTER VII
110
Dangers of universal suffrage ib 3 Causes to which they are owing
111
Formation of the Legislative Assembly
112
State of the country during the primary elections
113
Total want of property or decorum in the new Assembly and dangerous preponderance of young men in it
114
Increased emigration of nobles
115
Page 9 Opening of the Legislative Assembly
117
General character of the Assembly
118
Parties in the Assembly The Feuillants Character of Madame de Stael
119
Character of the Girondists
120
Their principles and errors
121
Their fatal mistake as to the character of man
123
Character of Madame Roland ib 16 Her great influence in the Assembly
125
Character of Vergniaud
126
Brissot His character
127
Guadet Gensonné Isnard Barbaroux and others
128
Picture of the Jacobins
129
Composition of the Jacobin Club and tests applied previous to admission
130
The secret of their success
132
Early history of Danton
133
His character
135
His redeeming qualities
136
Biography and character of Marat
138
Birth and early years of StJust
140
His character
141
Early years and education of Robespierre ib 30 His prizeessay at Metz in 1784
142
His first appearance in public life
143
His character has been disfigured by his contemporaries
145
His character and principles ib 34 His personal appearance and weaknesses
146
Club of the Jacobins
148
Views of the King at this period
149
Formation of the Constitutional Guard of the King
150
Vehement discontent of the church
151
Argument of Brissot and others against the emigrants ib 40 Answer of the Constitutionalists
152
Decree against the emigrants
153
Argument in favour of the clergy in the Assembly ib 43 Severe decrees against the clergy
154
The King refuses to sanction these decrees
155
Election of a Mayor of Paris
156
Distraction and misery of France
157
Decay and ruin of the navy
159
Commencement of agitation in St Domingo
160
The Assembly concedes universal emancipation
161
Origin of the disturbances at Avignon
162
Progress of the disorders in Avignon
163
Massacres at Avignon
164
Fall of the ministry and admission of the Girondists to power
165
Character of Dumourier
166
Of M Roland ib 57 Increasing difficulties of government and distress of the country
167
The disasters of the war augment the Kings danger
168
Debate on the disbanding of the royal guard
170
Indignation of France at the events of June
189
Fête of 14th July
195
Advance and proclamation of the Duke of Brunswick
202
Infamous treachery and dissimulation of Pétion
211
Massacre of the Swiss
217
Revolting cruelty of the women
223
The Constituent Assembly had destroyed the elements of freedom in France
226
Errors of the Allies which led to these events
227
Fatal effects of the want of religious principle in France
228
Coincidence of the successive leaders of the Revolution with the characters of its stages
229
CHAPTER VIII
231
Cause of this change
232
Fundamental error in democratic institutions
233
The wicked in revolutions inevitably rise to the head ib 5 State of Paris after the 10th August
234
Fury of the populace
235
Reappointment of the Girondist ministry
236
Disposal of the King and royal family
237
They are transferred to the Temple
238
The armies obey the ruling powers
239
Fall and flight of Lafayette
240
Furious demands for blood by the municipality of Paris
241
Institution of the Revolutionary Tribunal
242
Formation and first proceedings of the Revolutionary Tribunal
243
Its first victims and adoption of the guillotine ib 16 Death of Bachman and Durosoi
244
Consternation produced by the advance of the Prussians and plan for a massacre in the prisons
245
The barriers closed and the Assembly dissolves the municipality
246
Speech of Vergniaud to the deputation of the municipality
247
Answer of Tallien and the municipality
248
Energetic plans of Danton
249
General terror in Paris
250
Massacre in the prisons
251
In the Abbaye
252
Hideous cruelty of the people ib 26 Atrocious conduct of the populace in the court
253
Speech of BillaudVarennes to the murderers
254
Heroism of Monnot and Mademoiselles de Sombreuil and Cazotte
255
Massacre in the prison of the Carmes
256
Death of the Archbishop of Arles
257
Death of the Princess Lamballe ib 32 Extraordinary feelings of the murderers
259
Massacre of the Swiss
260
Massacres in the Conciergerie Bicètre and Salpetrière
261
Dreadful fate of M de Montmorin
262
Similar examples of cruelty in other countries ib 37 Feeble conduct of the Assembly
263
Robespierres arguments
275
They are separated from each other
298
Debate on the accusation
307
His removal to the place of execution
317
It illustrates the action of a despotic majority
324
General aspect of the British Isles
330
Great influence of race on national character
336
Their want of pacific industry and enterprise
342
Prodigious growth of the manufactures and commerce of Britain
348
22 Old constitution of Great Britain
351
Aspect of society in the British Islands at this period
352
Great firmness of George III
353
State of Great Britain in 1792
354
Revenues and military and naval forces
355
Depression in the national spirit and abuses in the army
356
Slumber of the national mind during the eighteenth country
357
Erroneous views of philosophers on the tendency of human affairs
358
Views of the Whigs on the Revolution
359
And of the Tories ib 32 Early history of Mr Fox
360
His character as a statesman and orator
361
Mr Pitt His early biography
362
His youth and studies at college
363
His early difficulties as a statesman
365
His character as a statesman and arduous struggle he maintained
366
Mr Burke His character and early history
367
His first entrance into life
368
His views on the French Revolution
369
Division between Mr Burke and Mr Fox on the Canadian constitution
370
Argument of Mr Fox for the French Revolution
371
Argument against it by Mr Burke
374
Rupture between them
377
Their final separation
378
Reflections on the event
379
State of Austria
380
Accession of Joseph II Innovation and improvement became the order of the day
382
Austrian Netherlands
383
Destruction of the barrier fortresses
384
Accession and character of Leopold
385
Revolt of the Flemings against Austria ib 55 State of the German Empire
386
Military state of Prussia ib 57 Military system of the monarchy
387
Its statistics and government
388
State of Russia
389
The Russian army and Cossacks
390
Character of the Russian soldiers
391
The civil institutions and government and national spirit of Russia
392
its divisions and partitions
393
Heroic military character of the Poles
394
Sweden ib 66 Ottoman dominions
395
Constant decline of their population
396
Italy ib 69 Piedmont
398
Character of the Spanish army ib 73 Character of the Spanish army 74 Switzerland
401
State of society over Europe at this epoch
402
Difference between the South and the North
403
General passion for innovation ib 78 State of France when hostilities commenced
404
Menacing language of the French with reference to other states
405
Mutual jealousies of the European powers at this period ib 81 Diplomacy of Prussia after the death of Frederick the Great
406
Designs of Austria on Turkey
407
Efforts of Mr Pitt to arrest the ruin of Turkey which are successful
408
Causes of this general pacification ib 85 Causes which brought on the Revolutionary war
409
Violent proceedings of the National Assembly against the German vassals of the French crown
410
Efforts of the King and Queen of France to effect their deliverance
411
Debate on the foreign powers and the emigrants
422
Preparations for war which the Emperor yet wished to avoid
424
It is opposed by Robespierre
425
Violent declamations in the National Assembly in favour of war
426
Violent speech of Brissot in favour of war ib 104 And again on 17th January 1792
427
Extraordinary efforts of Brissot and the Girondists to force on a war
428
Mutual recriminations which lead to war
429
Universal desire for war in France
430
The King yields against his own judgment
431
He acted contrary to his conviction in doing so
432
Universal joy which the declaration of war diffused in France
433
Real views of the Allies at this period ib 112 Accession of the Emperor Francis to the throne of Austria
434
Great Britain still strictly neutral till the 10th August made her prepare for war
435
French system of propagandism
436
French attack on Italy Geneva and Germany
437
French declaration of war against all nations
439
Decree of the Convention ib 118 Violent instructions to their generals by the French Convention
440
Alarm excited in Great Britain by these proceedings
441
Opening of the Scheldt
442
Answer of the French envoy on that of France
444
Real views of Great Britain at this period
445
War declared by France ib 125 Reflections on this event
447
Limits of the principle of noninterference
448
Grounds of the war as stated in British declaration ib 128 Conditions on which peace was still offered
449
CHAPTER X
451
Beneficial effects of this warlike passion ib 3 State of the French armies at the commencement of the war
452
The allied forces
453
French invasion of the Low Countries which is defeated
454
Reflections on the wretched state of the French army at this period ib 7 Consternation in consequence at Paris and movements of the Allies
455
Character of the Duke of Brunswick
456
His secret views on entering on this war
457
Selfish views of the allied powers at this period
458
Views of Dumourier and the government of Paris
459
The invasion of Champagne is resolved on ib 13 Impolitic invasion of Poland and wise views of Louis XVI
460
Proclamation of the Duke of Brunswick
463
Invasion of France and disposition of the French forces
464
Line of advance adopted by the Allies
465
Tardy advance of the Allies Longwy and Verdun surrender
466
The Allies fail to occupy the Argonne forest
467
Description of the Argonne forest which Dumourier seizes
468
Dumouriers position there
469
Dilatory motions of the Allies
470
Clairfait seizes the pass of CroixauBois
471
Retreat of Dumourier to SteMénéhould and rout of part of the French army ib 24 Dumourier takes post at SteMénéhould and the French armies unite
473
Consternation in the rear of the French army
474
Positions taken up by the French troops
475
Cannonade of Valmy
476
Great effects of this affair ib 29 French retain their position
477
Secret negotiation between the Duke of Brunswick and Dumourier
478
Which also paralysed the Allies on the field of Valmy
479
Effect of these negotiations on the allied movements ib 33 The emigrants advocate an advance to Paris
480
Progress of the negotiation
481
Intrigues at the Prussian headquarters
482
Motives which induced the Allies to retreat
483
Distress of the Allies who resolve to retire
484
Consternation at Paris from the retreat to SteMénéhould
485
Conferences opened for the retreat of the Prussians who retire
486
Their unmolested retreat ib 41 Operations in Flanders Siege of Lisle
488
Operations on the Upper Rhine and capture of Mayence
489
The Duke of Brunswick recrosses the Rhine
490
Plan for the invasion of Flanders
491
French invasion of Flanders ib 46 Battle of Jemappes
494
Results of the battle Tardy advance of Dumourier Conquest of Flanders
495
Jealousy of Dumourier at Paris ib 50 French advance to the Scheldt Fall of Antwerp and opening of that river
496
Liege and Namur taken by Dumourier in person
497
Dumourier puts his army into winterquarters
498
Decree of the Convention against all governments ib 54 Violent changes introduced into Belgium
499
Dreadful oppression of the French Revolutionists in Flanders
500
Strong reaction in consequence in Flanders
501
War declared against Piedmont
502
French enter Savoy ib 59 Their rapid conquests and cruel devastation
503
French invade Switzerland and attack Geneva
504
They fail in reducing Geneva but revolutionise all Savoy which is incor porated with France
505
Operations on the Upper Rhine
506
The French recross the Rhine
507
Reflections on these events
508
Great results to which the war was evidently to lead and causes of the Republican success
509
Necessity of acting vigorously against a revolution in the outset
510
Ease with which early success might have been gained
511
Faults of Dumourier ib 69 Extreme danger of France at the outset of the Revolution from the revolt of the army
512
Glorious efforts of France at this period
513
CHAPTER XI
514
Principle in human nature on which this is founded
515
General consternation at the death of Louis
516
Aspect of Paris after that event
517
It irrecoverably ruined the Girondists
518
Retirement of Roland from the Ministry of the Interior
519
The death of the King ultimately disappoints all parties
520
Their prejudicial effect on the Royalist and Constitutional cause
523
Plan of the Jacobins for resisting the Allies
524
Great distress in Paris and over France
525
Popular demands for a maximum ib 15 Tumult in Paris from the high prices
526
Its disastrous effects 116
527
Debates at the Jacobins on this subject
528
Remarkable speech of Robespierre there
529
Indecision of all parties in Paris 530 19 Indecision of all parties in Paris 20 Designs of Dumourier
531
His irruption into Holland in pursuance of it ib 22 Dumouriers designs against the Republic
532
His extreme imprudence 533 23 His extreme imprudence 24 Dumourier arrests the commissioners of the Convention
534
His failure and flight
535
Contests between the Girondists and Jacobins ib 27 Abortive conspiracy of the Jacobins
536
Proposal for the Revolutionary Tribunal
537
Vehement debate on this project in the Assembly
538
The Revolutionary Tribunal is established
539
Character of FouquierTinville its public accuser
541
War in La Vendée breaks out
542
Vigorous measures of the Convention
543
Important decree conferring the power of domiciliary visits on the Revo lutionary Committees
544
Decree establishing the Committee of General Defence
545
Law for disarming the emigrants priests and suspected persons
546
Vehement agitation which succeeded on Dumouriers flight ib 38 Appointment of the Committee of Public Salvation
547
The Girondists are denounced by Robespierre
548
Robespierres speech against the Girondists
549
Vergniauds reply
552
Marat is sent to the Revolutionary Tribunal
554
Vehement agitation to counteract this step
555
Marat is acquitted
556
Numerous condemnations by the Revolutionary Tribunal
557
Increasing difficulties of finding subsistence for the people and new de mands for a maximum
558
Enormous issue of fresh assignats
559
Proposal of Guadet for a separation of the Convention repelled and Com mission of Twelve appointed
562
The Commission of Twelve propose an armed guard for the Convention ib 51 Answer of Marat and the Jacobins
563
Menacing deputations which threaten the Convention
564
Desperate contest in the Convention and liberation of Hébert
565
The decree for which is reversed next day
566
Renewal of the insurrection on 31st May
568
Vast forces organised in the faubourgs
569
The mob surrounds and assails the Convention
571
The Jacobins organise a general insurrection
572
Last dinner of the Girondists together ib 61 Attack on the Convention
573
Vehement debate in the Assembly
574
They move out of the hall but are driven back by the armed multitude
575
The thirty Girondists are given up and imprisoned
576
Termination of the political power of the Girondists
577
Their trial and condemnation
579
Grounds of charge against the Girondists
580
Their last repast
582
Their heroic death
583
Execution of Dufoce and Rabaut StEtienne
584
Imprisonment of Madame Roland
585
Her conduct at her trial
586
His return to the Temple
587
74 Death of M Roland
588
Charlotte Corday Her character
589
She resolves to assassinate Marat and kills him
590
Her trial and condemnation
591
Her execution
593
Funeral honours and apotheosis of Marat
594
Arrest of seventythree members of the Convention
595
Reflections on the overthrow of the Girondists
596
Causes of their failure
597
Analogy of the rule of the Girondists and that of the Legislative Assembly
598
Atrocious character of the faction which overturned the Girondists ib 85 Instant weakness of the Girondists when they strove to coerce the Revolution
600
The early leaders of revolution can seldom restrain its last excesses
601
Effect of the heroic death of the Girondists
602
CHAPTER XII
604
Origin of the religious resistance in La Vendée to the Revolution ib 3 Character and aspect of the country
605
its peculiar character
606
The Marais
607
Obstacles which it opposes to an invading army ib 7 Manners of the inhabitants and the landlords
608
Character of the people
609
Strong religious feelings of the people
610
Feelings of the people on the breaking out of the Revolution
611
Discontent excited by the first severities against the priests
612
tion thereby excited
613
The levy of 300000 men occasions an insurrection
614
Fifty thousand men are soon in arms ib 16 Their leaders are appointed
615
Henri de Larochejaquelein
616
First conflicts and great activity in the country ib 19 The peasants mode of fighting
617
General confusion of ranks in the Vendean forces ib 21 Formidable nature of this warfare
618
Their preparations for an expedition
619
Their first onset and enthusiastic valour ib 24 But they cannot be kept to their standards after any success
620
Their total want of baggage and equipments
621
Their mode of giving orders and fighting
622
Their humanity till it was extinguished by the Republicans
623
Frightful early atrocities in Lower Poitou
624
Character of Boncbamp
625
Of Cathelineau 626 30 Of Cathelineau 31 Of Henri de Larochejaquelein
627
Of M de Lescure ib 32 Of M de Lescure 33 Of dElbée
628
Stofflet
629
And Charette ib 36 The forces which they severally commanded
630
Savage orders of the Convention against giving any quarter
631
The Royalists except in one instance never retaliated
632
The Republicans are defeated at Thouars ib 40 Storming of Chataigneraie and defeat at Fontenay
633
Bishop of Agra Great effect of an unexpected incident
634
Victory over the Republicans at Fontenay
635
Humanity of the Vendeans to the prisoners
636
Repeated successes of the Royalists ib 45 Their great assault on Saumur
637
Victory of the Royalists
638
Cathelineau created commanderinchief
639
Plan of the Vendean chiefs at this period
640
The Royalists defeated in their attempt on Nantes ib 50 Death of Cathelineau
641
Invasion of the Bocage by Westermann and its defeat ib 52 M dElbée is appointed generalissimo who defeats Birons invasion
642
Defeat of the Royalists at Luçon
643
General invasion of the Bocage on all sides which is defeated ib 55 Arrival of the garrison of Mayence
644
Able design of Bonchamp which is not adopted ib 57 Defeat of the Republicans at Torfou
645
And of Beysser at Montaigu
646
Defeat of General Rossignol at Coron and general defeat of the Repub lican invasion
647
Vigorous exertions the government at Paris
648
Continued humanity of the Vendean chiefs
649
scure mortally wounded
650
Fresh invasion by the Republicans Royalists defeated and M de Le 64 The Royalists resolve to cross the Loire Battle of Chollet
651
Battle of Chollet and defeat of the Royalists DElbée and Bonchamp mortally wounded
652
Glorious humanity and death of Bonchamp
653
Atrocious cruelty of the Republicans
654
Dreadful passage of the Loire
655
Their great difficulties in Brittany which they enter
656
Henri de Larochejaquelein is made commanderinchief ib 71 Battle of ChateauGontier
657
Great results of this victory
658
Desperate state of the Republicans after their defeat
659
Death of M de Lescure
660
The Royalists repulsed at Granville
661
Their retreat towards the Loire
662
They defeat the Republicans at Pontorson and at Dol
663
Their desperate situation and ultimate victory
664
Their glorious victory and humanity at Antrain
665
Their great difficulties notwithstanding these victories
666
They are repulsed at Angers
667
They in vain attempt to cross the Loire
668
The are defeated with great loss at Mans
669
Dreadful rout which ensued
670
Their hopeless state Heroic conduct of Henri de Larochejaquelein ib 86 Final rout at Savenay
671
Total ruin of the Vendeans
672
Tardy movements of the British to support the insurgents
673
Ruinous consequences of this delay ib 90 Operations of Charette
674
Death of Henri de Larochejaquelein
675
And the Prince de Talmont Unheardof cruelties of the Republicans
676
Thurreau and the infernal columns
677
Executions at Nantes Legion of Marat
678
Carriers republican baptisms and marriages
680
Dreadful scenes in the prisons
682
Scenes of horror on recovering the bodies from the Loire
683
Courage of the peasants in their last moments
684
And Madame de Bonchamp
685
Cruelty of the small shopkeepers in the towns
686
Heroic benevolence of the country peasants
687
Reflections on the extraordinary successes of the Vendeans
688
And the cause of their disasters
689
Vendean war finally commits the Revolution against religion
690
Appendix
691

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Page 51 - We swear to be faithful to the nation, to the law, and to the king ; and to maintain with all our power the constitution decreed by the National Assembly and accepted by the king ; and to remain united to all Frenchmen, by the indissoluble ties of fraternity.
Page 685 - ... dans aucune loi existante ; n'ayant que Dieu pour témoin de mes pensées , et auquel je puisse m'adresser, je déclare ici en sa présence mes dernières volontés et mes sentimens. » Je laisse mon âme à Dieu, mon créateur ; je le prie de la recevoir dans sa miséricorde, de ne pas la juger...
Page 685 - Je plains de tout mon cœur nos frères qui peuvent être dans l'erreur ; mais je ne prétends pas les juger, et je ne les aime pas moins tous en Jésus-Christ , suivant ce que la charité chrétienne nous enseigne.
Page 687 - Hue, que leur véritable attachement pour moi avait portés à s'enfermer avec moi dans ce triste séjour, et qui ont pensé en être les malheureuses victimes. Je lui recommande aussi Cléry, des soins duquel j'ai en tout lieu de me louer depuis qu'il est avec moi.
Page 372 - Fly from the French Constitution.' " Fox at this point eagerly called to him that there was no loss of friends. "Yes, yes," cried Burke, " there is a loss of friends. I know the price of my conduct. I have done my duty at the price of my friend. Our friendship is at an end.
Page 685 - Paris , par ceux qui étaient mes sujets, et privé de toutes communications quelconques , même depuis le 10 du courant avec ma famille; de plus, impliqué dans un procès dont il est impossible de prévoir l'issue, à cause des passions des hommes, et dont on ne trouve aucun prétexte ni moyen dans aucune loi existante , n'ayant que Dieu pour témoin de mes pensées, et auquel je puisse m'adresser, je déclare, ici, en sa présence, mes dernières volontés et mes sentiments.
Page 457 - Queen, or royal family, and if provision is not immediately made for their safety, preservation, and liberty, they will inflict a signal, rare, and memorable vengeance, by delivering up the city of Paris to military execution and total overthrow, and the rebels guilty of such attempts to the punishment they have merited.
Page 409 - Comte d'Artois, jointly declare that they regard the present situation of his majesty the King of France, as a matter of common interest to all the sovereigns of Europe. They trust that this interest will not fail to be recognized by the powers, whose aid is solicited, and that in consequence they will not refuse to employ, in conjunction with their said majesties, the most efficient means in...
Page 365 - He could not account for it, unless it was that Canada having been formerly a French colony, there might be an opportunity of reviving those titles of honour, the extinction of which some gentlemen so much deplored, and to revive in the West that spirit of chivalry which had fallen into disgrace in a neighbouring country.
Page 370 - ... torn asunder, and every man seemed to thirst for the blood of his neighbour. - Black spirits and white, blue spirits and grey, Mingle, mingle, mingle.

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