Page images
PDF
EPUB

V CONTENTS OF VOL. I.

HISTORY

OP THE

COUNTIES OF SURREY AND SUSSEX.
BOOK I.

GENERAL HISTORY.

CHAPTER I.

SITUATION, BOUNDARIES, EXTENT, ETYMOLOGY, GENERAL
APPEARANCE, CLIMATE, SOIL, AGRICULTURE, &C.

The Counties of Surrey and Sussex are situated Chap. i.
in the south-eastern part of the kingdom. The situation,
northern boundary is formed by London and Middlesex, extent*
and a very small portion of Buckinghamshire; the
western by Hampshire and Berkshire; and the eastern
by Kent. The two counties assume a form nearly
quadrangular, excepting on the north side, where the
winding of the river Thames makes a deep indentation;
and at the opposite angle, where Sussex extends to the
east-ward. Surrey is computed to be thirty-nine miles in
length, from east to west; and twenty-five miles in
breadth, from north to south; and its circumference is
estimated at one hundred and forty-six miles. Accord-

Book I. ing to the agricultural survey, made in 1794, this county taken as a plane contains about 481,947 statute acres; but other authorities make its contents 811 square miles, or about 519,000 acres. It lies between 51° and 51° 30' north latitude, and 0° 9' east, and 0° 45' west Iongitude, from Greenwich.

Sussex lies between 50° 43' and 51° 9' north latitude, and 0° 49' east, and 0° 58' west longitude from Greenwich. In Templeman's tables, which we quote as the only official statement, although the accuracy cannot be fully depended on, the superficial area of the county is stated to be 1,416 square miles, and 1,140,000 acres; the circumference one hundred and fifty-eight, the length sixty-five, and the breadth twenty-six miles. Another computation reduces the number of acres to 908,952; but this is likewise erroneous. The real length of Sussex from Emsworth to Kent Ditch, measures seventy-six miles; the medium breadth falls short of twenty; and the superficial contents amount to 933,360 acres.

On the departure of the Romans, and the new division of the country, which took place under the Saxons, by the name of the Heptarchy, these counties were reduced to a separate government, and assumed the title of Su$ Seaxnaluce, i. e. the kingdom of the South Saxons, containing by estimation, 7000 hides.*

styrno- On the subsequent division of England into counties, ogy' or Scynes, the northern portion received the name of

•A hide of land in the time of Edward the Confessor, was 120 acres ; but land was not measured in England, till about the year 1008, when the realm became tributary to the Danes; and for the more equal laying on of the tax, the country was measured, and the money levied per hide, and all paid danegelt accordingly.

« PreviousContinue »