Page images
PDF
EPUB

And

THE RAIL-ROADS OF NEW YORK. 32 miles of the Buffalo Road has been sold for $322,000, which, deducted from cost of road and equipment, leaves that sum $2,415,014 29. Add to the Hudson Road $1,087,171,04 interest.

Northern Road add $70,000 for docks, $108,868 expenses ; $507,185 losses.

Oswego Rochester Syracuse Utica Buffalo and For 3 moa,
Buffalo and Hudson New-York and

And
and
and

Sale Rorh. Lnek
EXPENSES OF MAINTAINING ROAD.

Rochester, River.

Erie.

Northern Syracuse. Syracuse. Uties. Schenectady. Line. & N. Falls.
Repairs of road-bed and railway, except cost of iron.... $29,087 45.. $59,512 98.. $188,351 29.. $39,458 80.. $9,645 54.. $83,878 80.. $38,526 48. . $43,120 05.. $16,942 54..$10,695 24
Depreciation of way......

2,178 21.
Cost of iron used in repair

55,080 00..
Repairs of buildings.............

2.046 15.. 780 22.. 5,412 52.. 6,122 16.. 248 92.. 7,496 07.. 3,001 07.. 3,777 30.. 22 79.. 1 00
Repairs of fences and gates........

1.295 30.. 23 35.. 3,948 44.. 831 78.. 293 47.. 7,749 91.. 2 895 38.. 458 74.. 62 12.. 28 66
Taxes on real estale....

12,080 34.. 10,846 90.. 43,233 01., 6,738 51.. 1,675 56.. 14,963 79.. 11,994 45.. 18,605 80.. 719 14..

Ta pairs of rebuilding repairs.....

Cost of

of buildings cates........

Total.............

$44,509 26.. 71,163 45.. 296,267 26.. 53,151 25.. 11,863 52.. 114,088 57. 58,595 59.. 65,961 89.. 17,757 59.. 10,725 00
EXPENSES OF REPAIRS OF MACHINERY.
Repairs of engines and tenders.......

18,240 42.. 62,635 19.. 203,312 48.. 22,937 84.. 3,365 18.. 48,359 79.. 27,135 85.. 23,300 32.. 2,153 91.. 2,054 03
Repairs of passenger and baggage cars......

34,907 49.. 63,355 07.. 5,184 39.. 1,105 95.. 17,247 08.. 14.356 91.. 20,288 54.. 586 81.. 302 25
Repairs of freight cars......

7,221 50.. 4,594 95.. 68,804 71.. 12,705 83. 1,325 20.. 22,743 02.. 7,933 62.. 12,763 64.. 888 52.. 81 60
Depreciation do.

89 12
Repairs of tools and machinery in shops.

1,392 31.. 2,289 46.. 24.389 24.. 2,395 84.. 116 87.. 4,457 38.. 1,306 72.. 2,794 38.. 11 95..
Incidental expenses, including oil, fuel, clerk, watch., &c. 1,545 21.. 9,912 48.. 18,684 24.. 10,318 98..

6,314 31.. 5,230 19.. 8,364 45.. 252 50.. 2,527 00
Total.....

..... $32,889 27., 114,029 57.. 378,546 74.. 53,541 88.. 5,913 20., 99,311 98., 55,963 39.. 67,511 33.. 3,898 59.. -
EXPENSES OF OPERATING THE ROAD.
Office expenses, stationery, &c. .......

2,512 84... 8,822 49.. 28,812 91.. 2,788 32.. 585 69.. 5,499 56.. 1,642 23.. 1,285 87.. 317 22.. 666 80
Agents and clerks....

10,041 66.. 27,490 20.. 79,868 51.. 28,781 62., 1,792 50.. 21,285 66.. 14,537 05.. 15,232 80.. 4,244 64. 3,235 93
Labor, loading and unloading freight..
8,053 09.. 20,821 23.. 90.367 37.. 20.299 38..

5,121 33.. 2,636 24.. 5,770 56.. 3.264 26.. 128 00
Porter, watehmen and switch tenders...

7,166 96..
21,420 16.. 9,284 40..

0,001 67.. 2,660 08.. 2,254 60.. 2 408 07.. 2,259 63
Wood and water-station attendance.....

5,554 96.. 7,888 86.. 6,019 49.. 3,242 55.. 3,158 10.. 10,042 66.. 5,870 11.. 4,513 79.. 1.558 13.. 765 79
Conductors, baggage and brakemen.....

12,753 36.. 32,881 74.. 178,410 03.. 20,425 31.. 1,630 00.. 24,004 64.. 10,550 03.. 13.349 52.. 3,552 39.. 1.958 25
Enginemen and tiremen....,

21,186 06.. 24,421 68.. 131,222 17.. 12,448 00.. 3,254 72.. 31,687 66. 15,009 34 18,672 99.. 4.002 46. 1,887 04
Fuel, cost and labor preparing .....

38,130 41.. 169,858 28.. 262,363 68.. 18,620 00.. 12,218 36.. 80,786 81.. 45,768 71.. 75,569 13.. 15,902 80.. 4,486 93
Oil and waste for engines and tenders.

4,559 19.. 12,541 10.. 54,449 06.. 2,658 09.. 1,336 60.. 6,964 55.. 2,340 39.. 8,108 78.. 1,082 55..
Do. do freight cars....
2,294 59.. 2,218 29.. 21,625 68.. 3,278 88..

..

1,432 27.. 1,718 58.. 5,119 71.. 1,390 02.. Do. do. passenger and baggage cars 2,294 60.. 4,745 60.. 1,921 71.. 304 61..

3,702 58.. 1,718 58..

526 73.. 2,032 92
Loss and damage of goods and baggage....

2.300 27.. 2,504 85.. 36,766 16.. 1,655 93 1,128 09.. 5,412 73. 1,972 90.. 1,764 45.: 1,103 01..
Damages for injuries to persons.....

1,861 53... 7.283 61.. 18,638 32.
· 109 00.. 16,355 01.. 1,253 69..

.. 125 12.. 443 88
Do. to property including fire and cattle killed.. 1,633 57.. 1,730 22., 3.857 85.. 334 51.. 446 12. 3,442 07.. 2,477 77.. 1,107 50.. 1,215 31.. 164 00
General superintendence.....

2,499 96.. 3,979 16., 20,120 30. 11,449 33.. 2,048 60.. 2,550 00.. 4,845 72.. 5,625 02.. 1,233 28.. 300 00
Contingencies...........

4,831 46., 74,472 92.. 20,090 34.. 17,975 85.. 2,124 84.. 1,802 25.. 11,322 75.. 12,065 81.. 2,647 76.. 378 28
Total. ....

.....$127,254 53.. 482,068 57.. 968,953 74.. 153,029 78.. 29,832 62.. 225,142 45.. 126,334 17..171,530 83.. 44,663 75.. 18,701 50
EARNINGS AND CASH RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS.
DARNING-From passengers...........

431,357 29.. 17,204 08.. 1,382,636 $7.. 93,548 29.. 54,903 00.. 682,820 45.. 409,308 19..619,903 72.. 98,097 49.. 64,185 41
Do. freight...............

166,098 12.. 31,240 60., 1,883,198 76.. 322.951 44.. 21.016 43.. 273,344 41.. 192,744 23.361,656 81.. 31,530 49.. 2.132 32 Do. other sources ..........

23,521 23.. 1,000 00.. 271,930 90.. 19.346 01.. 14,697 50.. 32,193 05.. 14,865 69.. 48,214 25.. 4,678 54.. 1,930 90 RECEIPTS-From passengers......

431,357 29.. 17,204 08. 1,371.529 20., 90,397 87.. 54,903 00.. 682,829 45.. 409,308 19..619,903 72.. 97,166 99.. 64,185 41 Do. freight..........

166,098 12.. 30,200 00.. 1,995,684 39.. 294,163 71.. 21,016 43, 273,344 41.. 181.116 60. 361,656 81.. 31,530 49.. 2,132 32 Do. other sources......

.. 47,409 78.. 1,000 00.. 292,401 70.. 20,621 01.. 14,697 50.. 32,193 05.. 14,379 79.. 52,692 70.. 2.440 33.. 1,930 90 PAYMENTS-For transportation expenses.

204,653 06.. 32,978 85.. 1,691,623 82..

47,609 34.. 438,542 60.. 240,893 15..305,004 05.. 33,041 37.. interest .....

10,297 07.. 16,465 33.. 1,114,939 07.. 245,319 51.. 14,233 03.. 51,147 00.. 5,415 75.. 4,512 76.. dividends....

182,581 55. — . 416,334 00. - .. 12,250 00.. 404,185 60.. 203,800 00..412,400 00.. ..

Rail-roadsEarnings, Cash Receipts, Payments, s.c.

409,308

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]

...nom

Comparative Statement of the Stocks and Prices of

1851

1859 Cotton in New York.

Good middling ........9%....10% ......94...10%

Middling fair... .....104....11....... 9%...11 1851 1859- Fair...............

.....10%....11%..... ..... June 30.

Dec. 31.
Up'de. N. Oris. Upd's. N. Or's.

Fully fair..... ....11......nom.....10%...12
Good fair.

....nom..... .....nom...nom Inferior .. ..7%.....8........7......7%

Fine.......... Ordinary ..... ...8....... ........7%....8

Stock, bales.............40,000........... 25,000 Middling ....

.94.....9%......8%....8 Good middling ...... 94....10%..... 82....94 BREADSTUFFS.-Flour and grain, for Middling fair ........10......104......9.....9% Fair ......... ......104.... 12........94...10

* the greater part of the past year, 1852, Fully fair ........... nom.... nom..... nom... 10% ruled low, and it was only with the comGood fair.....

" ...11

mencement of the past autumn that Fine... Stock, bales ..

..50,000......

.36,000 prices began to advance, closing, on the

31st December last, at higher figures 1851.

--1862- than at the close of the preceding year. Inferior...... ....7%.....8........8 .....8

We annex the comparative quotations Ordinary .............8%.....8%......8%....9% Middling ..... .......9%.....9%......9%....9% for flour in 1851 and 1852:

December 31, 1851.

December 31, 1852.
Sour, per bbl.

...$4 87% a 85 06
Superfine, No. 2....

5 00 a 5 186 State, common brands...

4 37% a 4 43%.

5 50 a 5 36 State, stght. brands ......

4 43% a 4 50

5 56% a 5 62% State, favorite brands......

4 56% a 4 62%

5 62% a 5 75 Western, mixed brands.....

4 50 4 4 564.

5 62% a 5 68% Michigan and Indiana, stght. brands..

4 62% a 4 68%.

5 68% a 5 75 Michigan, fancy brands .....

4 68% a 475 ...

5 75 a 5 814 Ohio, common to good brand ...

4 56% & 4 62%

5 68% a 5 % Obio, rnd, hoop, common ....

4 56 & 4 62

5 75 a 5 SI Obio, fancy brands ...

4 75 a 4 93%

5 75 a 5 93% Genesee, fancy brands ....

75 a 4 93

5 814 a 6 00 Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, ext.

5 00 & 5 25

6 00 & 6 37% Genesee, extra brands...

5 00 8 5 75

6 00 a 6 56% Canada (in bond)......

4 37% a 4 50

5 87% 8 5 93% Brandywine.........

4 43% a 4 50

5 75 & Georgetown......

4 43 a 4 50

5 75 a Petersburg city .......

4 43 a 4

5 75 a Richmond country....

4 37% a 4

5 62%a Alexandria .....

4 37 a 4

5 56% a 5 62% Baltimore, Howard-street ...

37 44

.. 5 62% a Rve flour ......................

3 50 a

. 4 56% a 4 62% Corn meal, Jersey .......

3 25 a -

3 81a 3 87% Corn meal, Brandywine ......

3 37% a 3 50 .

.. 4 00 " per punch...

15 00 a 15 56

- a 18 00

The movements in grain have more

Dec. '51.

Southern white. .... or less kept pace with those of flour.

- a - .......... 69 a 71

Southern yellow... - --..........70 a 71 The crops of wheat last year were larger Southern mixed ...... and of better quality than usual. The Western mixed ....... 67 a 68..........77 a 78

Western yellow ......

....76 a 78 supplies from Canada and the Southern

RYE. states were large, and of good quality, while the great receipts of Western,

Northern, per bush... 77 a 78..........88 a 90 with Genesee, &c., showed about the

BARLEY. average of the previous year in quantity Two and four rowed, { 80 a 83..........70 a 73

per bush....... and quality. The crop of Indian corn, which is always large, was a full average

DATS. one. Oats, rye, and barley, were also

River and Canal, per 47 a 48..........50 a 52

bush. ..............) in fair supply. We annex tables of West'n & Canada do... -- -- ..........50 a 51 comparative prices :

New-Jersey do....... 42 a 44..........48 a 50 WHEAT.

Rice.-It will be perceived that the Dec. 31, 1851. Dec. 31, 1852. White Genesee, per si 12 a $1 15. . $1 30 a $1 35

prices for this article have continued to bush ..........

be very uniform since 1846 and '47, Do. Canada (in bond) 95 a 1_ . 1 25 a 1 31%

when there was such a large demand Southern white ..... a I 08.. 1 28 a 1 31 Ohio white......... -a 1 05.. 1 29 a 1 32 for export. In the summer of '47 fair Michigan white ...... I-a 1 05.. 1 29 a 1 32 quality sold at as high as 53-4 a 6 Western red .........-- -.. 1 20 a - -Mixed western........- -- ----,. 1 25 & -

cents; the same quality has been sold

this year at six cents on account of short CORN.

supply and large demand for California. Round yellow ........ a ..........68 a 69 Round white.......

......-- -- Rice was first introduced into this country

[ocr errors]

Stocks and Prices of Cotton-BreadstuffsProvisions, fc. 549

tierce.........)

Broken.............274

Irish .........

..........

......

.......... 24 a 27

in the year 1647. A half bushel was used

PORK. as seed, and planted in Virginia, which

Prices, Dec. 31, 1881. * Dec. 31, 1861.

Mess, old........$14 75 a 14 87*. . $19 --a--yielded' sixteen bushels, which result

Mess, new... .... 14 50 a --- . 19 50 a ---encouraged future operations. The first Prime, old .. . 13 50 & shipment was made to England in 1698, Prime, new ...... ----a--- 16 50 a

Clear ......

..---- ---- .. 21 -- a which consisted of about 215 casks, and Prime mess.: since that period the export demand has

BEEF continued to increase, until now, when Mess, country, \ $8 - a 8 62%.. $9 50 a 10 50

per bbl. ... we export almost two-thirds of our crop, per

Mess, city.....

9 50 a 10 - .. - -a- which amounts to about 225,000 tierces. Mess, extra ...... 10 50 a 11 - .. 14 25 a 14 50 Carolina rice commanded the prize Prime, country... 4- a 4 50. 5 50 a 6 12%

Prime, city... 4 75 a 5 25 .6 25 a 6 37% medal last year at the great London ex- Prime mess, per 14 50 a 15 - .. 19 - a 22 hibition, and will continue to be in favor -as it is the best-so long as it can be

PICKLED MEATS. afforded at a reasonable rate. We pro- Hams, per lb..........9a-........10% a ll ceed to annex tables of comparative Shoulders, do ... ... - •*•

do ..........- - ..

9a 974 prices, with imports, exports, stocks, &c.:

BEEF HAMS. 1847 1848 1849. In pickle, per barrel.... $13 75......$14 75 a 15 50 .....2% a 3 .2% a 2%..2% a 2%

LARD. Inferior and com....3% a 34.2% a 2%..234 a 3 Prime Ohio, per lb..... 92 - ......124 a 12% Middling and fair....3% a 3%..3 a 3%..3% a 4 Good and prime.....3% a 3%..36 a 3%..34 a 7-16

BUTTER.

Orange County, per lb.. 21 a 23....... ...27 a 30 1850 1851 1859. Broken ............2% a 2..24 & 25..3 8 34 State.....

... 14 a 18.... ... 20 a 24 Inferior and com....2% a 2%..2% a 3%8..3% a 34 Ohio.................. Il a 14.......... 16 a 20 Middling and fair... .2% a 3%8..34 a - ..3% a 4%

CHEESE. Good and prime ....3% a 3%..3% a 3%..44 a 4%

Fair to prime, per lb.... 6% a 7%

8 a 9 Stock.

Casks. December 31, 1852..........

.1,610 GROCERIES.-The chief Aluctuations in " 1851...

...2,813

sugar, coffee, and molasses in prices, "6 " 1850.........

...3,310 ha

have, if anything, been in favor of the Imports.

Exports.
Csaks.

kes year 1851, compared with those of 1852. 1846.

..37,882. . 26,823 These articles meet with an increasing 1847....

41,840,

29,618 consumption every year, and their value, 1848.

.42,434. 1849...

.52,880.

29,385 like other articles, is regulated by sup1850.

44,354.

26,105 ply and consumption, or demand. The 1851.

.49,312

....24,814

chief foreign supplies of sugar are de1852.......

.48,879

...25,318 From the East Indies..... 3,000 bags.

rived from the West Indies, and princi

pally from the island of Cuba; while PROVISIONS.—Provisions have, within

the domestic production, both in Louisithe past year, materially advanced.

d. ana, Florida. and Texas, as well as in The stock of old pork was greatly re

te the maple forests of the North, has been duced at the opening of the past season,

largely augmented. The present conor at the commencement of last

* sumption of cane-grown sugar in the autumn. A scarcity of hogs at the

e United States is estimated to be equal West, with an increased demand for

to about 10,000 boxes per month, or pork in California and Australia, sent

2,500 per week, equal to about 500,000 up prices. Thus, on the 31st December, 1851, mess pork sold at $14 50 a $14 75,

* tons per annum. Our limits do not perwhile, on the 31st December, 1852, it

mit our going more into detail. We

annex the comparative prices of sugars brought $19 a $19 50, and in the same

for the periods indicated: month sold at $20, to arrive. Our limits do not permit us to go into details re

SUGARS.

Dee, '52.

Dee. '51. garding the pork trade at the West, in.

St. Croix .........

... 6 a 7 cluding tables of supplies and consump- New Orleans........... 4% a 6 .. 4% a 6

Cuba Muscovado.... 4 a 6 .. 4% a 5%

Porto Rico ......... With the advance in pork other Havana, white .........

4% 6%.. 4% a 6%

74.. 7 a 8 articles of provisions have generally Do., brown and yellow 44 a 6 .. 4% a 7

Jamaica ......

5 & - .. 5 a 54 sympathized, and have advanced wa Brazil, white.. ........ 4 a 7%

6 a 6% it. The movements of each are shown Do.“ brown

4% a 5 by the following comparative tables of Stuarts double refi'd loaf 8 - .. 8%

Do do do. crush'd 7% a

8% a prices:

Do. (A) crushed...... 717

8% a

tion.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Stock, Den. '51.

Dee, '89, The largest imports are made at NewNumber of hogsheads. 7,582.

boxes..... 13,512... ..23,000 Orleans, New-York and Baltimore, and bags ...... 26,105. .... 12.150 in the order we have named them. The cases..... 302............

inports from Brazil into New Orleans, Molasses.-The supply and value of for the year ending the 30th June, 1852, molasses generally corresponds more or amounied to 402.000 bags. Rio coffee less with the supply and prices of sugars. forms the great bulk of that consumed We annex comparative prices:

by the inhabitants of our Western states. Proes, Dee. '51. Dec. '52. On the Atlantic coast, Java, Laguayra, New-Orleans, per gal. 27 a - ............30 a 31 Maracaibo, with other kinds, enter freely Porto Rico.........

.22 a 29

into consumption. We annex comparaCuba Muscovado...... 18 a 25 ...... 20 a 22 Trinidad, Cuba.......20 a 25 ...

20 a 22 tive lists of prices : Cardenas, &c..........18 a 19 ....... .20 a 21

Dec. '81.

Dec. 5 St»ck, Jan. '80. Jan. '51. Jan. '59. Java, white, per lb ....11 a 11%.. 11 a 12% Hogsheads.......3,300........ 4,000......... 1,115

.13% a 14 .. 121 a 13% Brazil......

. 8 a 94.. COFFEE.—The movements in this Laguayra ............. 8% a 9%.. 96 & 94 article of trade are quite interesting,

Maracaibo.... .8% a 9%..

Costa Rica..... .8%a9%.. 9% a 10% but our room compels us to be brief. St. Domingo (cash).... 7% a 8... 8 a sx The annual increase in the consump

consump- Stocks, bags.............. 89,316.. ........53,483 tion of coffee in the United States has been very great. In 1821, it amounted to

Fish. The fishery excitement last 11,886,063 pounds, or 5.306 tons: and in summer and autumn, had the effect of 1835, a period of fourteen years, we find interfering with the catch of mackerel, that it actually reached to the large which was smaller than usual, and the quantity of 91.752,802 pounds, or to stock in this market on the 31st Decem40.961 tons. Prior to the revolution. St. ber, 1852, was not over one-fourth what Domingo produced the largest supply of it

of it was in 1851. Hence prices have coffee, which in 1792 reached 35.000 ruled higher than previously, notwithtons; and had not the island been sacri. standing the importations of foreign fish ficed to the blacks. it was expected in have been much larger than usual. Dry another year to have reached 42,000 cod, on the contrary, which are taken tons. Cuba, also, at one time produced in our own waters, show a large increase considerable coffee but it has since its in stock over the same period in 1851. culture in Brazil, yielded to the cultiva. The stocks of each may be stated as foltion of sugar. The growth of coffee in lows:

Dee. '51. Dee. .. Brazil has been wonderfully augmented.

y augmented: Dry Cod, quintals, in store....1,500..........9,000 In 1821, the quantity exported was only Þo. afloat..... 7,200 tons, while in 1839-40 it reached 30,000 tons. The exports from Brazil, Mackerel :

Total......................1,500..........13,000 within the three or four past years, have in store, No 1, large, bbls.......

1,000 been as follows:

Small shore, No. 1,

No. 2,
4R-149.
49-KO.

No. 3,
Total exports, bags........1,622,188.... 1,142,000
To the United States ..... 744.(180.... 574,233

No. 3, small, bbls.
Total exports, bags........1,844,000 ... 1,800,000

Total, Dec. 31, 1852, “ ............... 2,700 '50-'81.

81-'89.
Total, Dec. 31

...12.000 To the United States....... 844,507.... 947,700

Decrease .....

... 9.300 The export for 1851-52 is estimated. Pickled herring-estimated ................. 5,500

Dec. '51.

Dee. '59. Dry cod, per cwt..

a 2 87%..

.. $3 65 a 3 80 Dry scale ............

- - a 2 00

2 75 & 3 00 Pickled cod, per barrel ...

- a 3 00

--a 3 75 Mackerel, No 1, Massachusetts, new

8 50 a 8 62%

EU

730

500

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

50 a 11 75 Do. No. 1, Halifax ................

-a 12 75 Do. No. 2, Massachusetts, new... 7 00 a 7 25

975 a 10 00 Do No. 2, Halifax ...... Do. No. 3, Halifax.....

5 00 a 5 25

25 a 7 50 Salmon, pickled, No. I...

15 00 a 15 Do. pickled, per tierce .....

19 00 a 20 Shad, Connecticut, No. 1, % barrel...

6 00 a
Shad, Southern, per barrel...
Herring, pickled.....
Do. scalded, per box..........

-- 45 a Herring, No. 1...

- 25 a

30 a - 32

Till laula

ಪ ದ ದ

a 23 50

[ocr errors]

Fruit.— The importations of foreign ing the past year there was a great fallfruit at this port are very large, includ. ing off in the crop, with a corresponding ing both dry and green. Our statistics decrease of imports to the United States, apply to the former. The chief im- and enhancement of prices. This is portations of raisins are derived from seen from the following tables : Malaga, in Spain. It appears that dur

IMPORTS OF MALAGA RAISINS INTO THE PORT OF NEW YORK.
Boxes.
Half do.
Quarter do.

Kege.

Half do. 1851 ............ 246,989............69,446............ 77,585............7,155............4,958 1852..... .....143,530........... 50,410..... ....44,870.... ....2,467...

.1,315

Decrease .... 103,459.. ..........19,036............32,715........

Prices, Dee. '51.
Raisins, Sumatra, per cask .......... $4 50 & $5 25
Raisins, bunch, per box..

1 62% a 1 65 ..
Raisins, layer ..........

2 12% a Raisins, cluster....

1 15 a -Currants, Zante, per lb....

5 a 5%.. Citron............

22 a 23 Almonds, Languedoc

13% a Almonds, Mar's, soft shell..

13 a Almonds, Ivica, soft do.

12% a
Almonds, Sicily, soft do.

8 a 10 .
Almonds, shelled..
Sardines, per box.....
Ginger, Canton, per case.....

.. 700 a 7 25 .....

-4,688............3,643

Dec. '89.

a 2 80 a 3 25 & 1 87% a

9% 23 a 24 14 a 15

a 144 14 a 14%

8 a 9 - a 22 60 a 62%

[graphic]

IRON.—There has been considerable ment in price, which tended to impart activity in iron during the past year, greater activity to our own manufacwith a material enhancement of prices tures. The demand for rail-road iron in both Scotch pig and rail-road bars. has become enormous, and some delay The many new uses to which iron is an- is likely to occur in meeting the wants plied in building and to other purposes, of the vast number of roads either have greatly augmented the consump- building or projected in the United tion of the article. The duty being ad States. We annex a comparative statevalorem, has advanced with the advance. ment of prices:

[ocr errors]

59.

PIG.
December 31.

December 31.
English and Scotch, per ton ..... .....$19 50 a 20 50 ..............$30 00 a 31 60
American, No. 1.......

... 21 00 a 22 00.... American, common..........

..... 19 00 a 20 00.............

BAR. Fritzoe, T. V.F.....

105 00 &

.102 50 a 105 00 Norway, N. IF. K.

105 00 &

105 00 a Fork Stamps .....

105 00 a

105 00 a WR-Lancashire......

- a 90 00...

- a 90 00 Russia, P.S. I.......

87 50 a 90 00..

87 50 a 90 00 Swedes, ordinary sizes..

80 00 a 82 50...

77 50 a 80 00 American, rolled

59 00 8 -

50 00 English, refined ......

47 50 a 50 00...

50 00 English, common...........

34 00 a 35 00...

65 00 a SHEET. Russia, first quality, per lb.....

10% a 11....

11 a 11% English and American..........

3, a 3%....

.... 3 a 3% HOOP. English and American, per cwt............... 3 00 a 350.............. 3.00 a 3 50

[ocr errors]

Wool.-Owing to secrecy on the part the demand. Prices are influenced by of some of the heavier holders of wool, the condition of the manufacturing busiit is impossible to get correct data in re- ness, plentiness of money, and general ference to stock at varions periods. Un. condition of trade. We can only say like cotton, the supply is not influenced that at present the stock on hand is about by the state of the weather at certain 8,000 bales foreign, and 500,000 pounds seasons, but the amount grown in all domestic. parts of the world is steadily on the in- Prices at the various dates were as crease. The supply is always equal to follows:

« PreviousContinue »