Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

39 25 14 321-2 2. Tower Hill, 110.000

45 30 15 3 84 3. Kingston,

88 41 47 13 17 4
4. Union,*

69 3831 154
5. Rocky Brook, 100,000 180 00 67 40 27 7+
6. Wakefield,
Primary.

49 24 25) 4 4
Grammar;

63 | 40 23 4 15 4
7. Point Judith, 157,000 145 78 38 2018 1 4 7 1 2
8. do.

70,000 121 00 21 12 9 1 24
9. Sugar Loaf Hill, 66,100

13 1 2
10.

52,000 85 00 30 112'18 2 64
11.

18 99 221.2
12. Perryville,

97 00 42 19 23 3 4 3 2 3
13. Green Hill, 50,000
14. Tuckertown,

88 00 20 119 64
15. Perkins,

18 11 7 2 2 4 1-2 16. Yawcoo,

24 13.11 63 17. Usquepaug, 48.942

28 13 15 2 831-2 18. Dugway,

15,000 75 85 18 10 8 1 2 1 2
19. Pier,

33 2013 3 4 4
20. Peacedale,

73 55 18 54 21. Moorsfield,

33 119(14) 53 *Commonly called Rodman's Corner.

LOCAL NAME.

1. Ferry,

130,000 112 66

138,350

40,000

66,000

35 000

69,000

21
28

8
16
20
19

8
20

20
44
13
21

7
21
16
32

36
38 40 00
17
18
30
16 14 00
13
30

[blocks in formation]

13
14
18
27
13
24
48
24

13
1
6
27
14
30
50
30

12 20 00
14
20 18 00
21
13 15 00
26 24 00
48 30 00
25

97,000|352 50

14 00

The foregoing table is defective, because the returns from some of the districts have not been filled out by the trustees. This we regret, because we wish to spread before our fellowcitizens a full account of our educational interests and operations.

This table is formed from the reports of the winter schools only, with the exception of the two columns respecting rateable property and expenditures. Quite a number of the schools in summer have been supported partly, or wholly, by money raised within their several districts.

In giving the average daily attendance, the fractional parts, as reported by the teacher, have been omitted.

It should be understood, also, that these returns do not give the whole number of scholars who have attended school in the course of the year; for, in every district, some attend in summer who do not attend in winter. The chairman has endeavored to ascertain the number of those who have attended only in summer, so that the next apportionwent of money may be made according to the exact number of scholars. his request, a portion of the district returns have given the information required. And he requests now, that the trustees who have not done this, will examine the record of their several schools, and thus ascertain how many scholars attended school last summer, who did not attend last winter, and send the result to him. By doing this, they will receive a larger sum from the treasury of the town.

The whole number of scholars in the town, who have attended school more or less, the present year, is not far from one thousand.

It will be seen by the table, that a large portion of the scholars did not continue in the school over one-half of the last winter term. Of course, the amount of benefit they received must have been very small. We should be unwilling to impute this great deficiency-this renunciation of the opportunities and advantages of education, to the indifference of parents to the subject. There is an evil here, which calls for a remedy. And we hope, that the returns of another year will exhibit a far more regular and prolonged attendance at school, and thus show a high appreciation of the many advantages of a thorough common school education.

Table showing the number of scholars who have attended to

branches of studies specified.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]

Beside the branches specified above, others have been attended to in some of the schools, viz.:

Drawing of maps, history, analysis of language, definitions, book keeping, drawing, and vocal music. We are much pleased to find, that in two or three schools, a few of the older scholars have given attention to the study of physiology. All classes of persons need to know more of the house they live in, and to understand better how to keep it in good condiTable showing the apportionment of money for the year end

ing June, 1852.

Average Division by Division by Balance in Districts. Attendance District. Attendance Treasury.

[blocks in formation]
[blocks in formation]

10 32 88 94

84 25

103 62 44 91 144 16

94 00

113 50 4 75 80 75 20 00 91 96

86 50 23 92 96 17

33 75 39 10 89 97 39 10 00

87 50 29 86 103 11 30 30 101 05 41 31 112 81

76 75 71 50 88 00

95 75 171 80 67

1,973 77

88 47 84 25 103 62 123 00

94 00 113 50 80 75 91 96 81 20 96 17 75 00 97 00 80 37 88 00 101 05 94 00 76 75 71 00 88 00 95 75 88 00

We have now in our possession the means of giving to all our youth a good common school education. By a diligent and careful use of these means, our youth may be prepared for usefulness and respectability in those spheres of labor to which the providence of Goil may call them.

It should not be overlooked, that the acquisition of knowledge is only one branch of education. Physical education, - or that which relates to our bodily organization and the preservation of health, is another part, which should receive constant attention from all who are conversant in the management of youth

Another part of education, and the most important of all, is moral training. It should be ever borne in mind, that we are immortal beings; and that we have a moral nature to be cultivated and fitted for a higher, nobler state of existence. This world is God's great school, and we all are learners in it.Our lessons are prescribed by himself in his own inspired book, and in those providential events, which belong to the administration of his government. The great principles of truth, virtue and piety, which he has taught us, should be diligently inculcated, and thoroughly wrought into the minds of all our youth, at home, and in the school room. They should be taught to regulate their passions--to maintain selfgovernment-and to cherish kind, amiable, and benevolent affections.

If this be faithfully done, we may see a generation enter upon the great theatre of human action, prepared to do honor to the State, under whose auspices they have been reared ; and to live so as to “grow in favor both with God and man."

JOEL MANN, Chairman of the School Committee.

day of

CONSTRUCTION OF THE SCHOOL LAW. The following decision of the Supreme Court, made May 10th, 1852, relates to the case which we have reported in our April number, page 219. It will be seen on examination that it only affects the mode of carrying into effect the decision of the Commissioner of Public Schools in a case appealed to him :

SUPREME COURT, MONDAY, MAY 10. Mowry Randall and another vs. Zelotes Wetherell, Town Treasurer, of North Providence.

Application for a mandamus. The application stated that the applicants, Trustees of School District No. 3, of North Providence, "did on

A. D., 1851, employ one Anson H. Cole, as a teacher in said district, and that on the 8th of January, 1852, there was justly due to said Cole, as teacher, the sum of $48 12. 'That said Trustees also employed one Hannah T. Smith, as a teacher in said district, and on the 23d of January, 1852, there was justly due to said Hannah, the sum of $18. That these bills were duly presented to the School Committee of said town for payment, but said Committee, January 24th, 1852, by vote refused to allow said bills, as they were by law bound to do, pretending that they were not due, and that the district was under no legal obligation to pay the same.”

From this vote of the Committee an appeal was taken to the Commissioner of Public Schools, who decided that the bills should be paid and drew an order on the Town Treasurer to pay out of any money in his office, standing to the credit of said district, or out of any school money in his office, said sums to Anson H. Cole and Hannah T. Smith. This order the Town Treasurer refused to comply with.

« PreviousContinue »