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ing, is often heard to complain of the disadvantage he lies under in every path of honor and profit. Could I but get over some nice points and conform to the practice and opinion of those about me, I might stand as fair a chance as others for dignities and preferment. And why can you not? What hinders you from discarding this troublesome scrupulosity of yours, which stands so grievously in your way? If it be a small thing to enjoy a healthful mind, sound at the very core, that does not shrink from the keenest inspection; inward freedom from remorse and purturbation ; unsullied whiteness and simplicity of manners; a genuine integrity

Pure in the last recesses of the mind; if you think these advantages an inadequate recompense for what you resign, dismiss your scruples this instant, and be a slave-merchant, a parasite, or—what you please."

But while we make persevering efforts for the promotion of education, we ought not, on the other hand, to be discouraged if we do not see any sudden or immediate results from our labors. The leaven of Christianity has been working in the world for eighteen hundred years, and the world is not yet Christian. If we make up our minds—as I think we must, without regard to statistics-that education does promote the welfare of a people as well as the good of the individual, we shall be prepared not to be alarmed by any apparent results of statistics. Most of the communities of the civilized world may be said to be in a transition state from ignorance to knowledge; and it is this fact, that their condition is a transition one, which enables us to account satisfactorily

for many things which the tables of crime exhibit to us. They have lost that sort of contentedness and negative happiness which results from brute ignorance in the mass and a strong government in the hands of the few, and they have not yet reached that state of intellectual and moral knowledge where each man is a law unto himself. The elements of society are in conflict, and we cannot expect peace; but better, far better, is any condition-conflicts, wars, and rumors of wars—than the apparent peace of quiet and submissive ignorance. Individuals may suffer, humanity must gain.

So in regard to the wonderful increase of wealth in the present age. The first effect of the increase of wealth, and while it is in the hands of the few, is to offer temptations to crime; and we see, as a consequence, an increase of certain sorts of offences in wealthy communities. But may we not hope, that as wealth becomes diffused, as its beneficial effects are felt through all classes of society, as the luxuries of one age become the necessaries of life to the next, as the poor

obtain comforts in one age which before only wealth could purchase, the class of crimes arising from disparity of wealth will diminish. Poverty and distress we know to be fruitful sources of those offences which our laws denounce as crimes. As these disappear before the progress of education and wealth, we may hope for a better state of society. If the diffusion of wealth is a blessing, then we must bear with whatever is necessary to this diffusion. So the principle of competition appears to be a necessary concomitant of the increase of wealth

- yet it leads to a great amount of misery and crime. In this light, we should look upon these evils as temporary ones—as the undeniable consequences of our being in what I have called a transition state.

These considerations serve to show us that while we should not indulge unreasonable expectations from moral education, we need not be without hope. We cannot expect, and perhaps ought not to, to remove all temptations from the way of youth. That virtue is of but little worth which has been brought up as a tender plant in the shade, and which is only virtue because it has never been exposed. We should rather endeavor to cultivate a moral energy which may be acquainted with vice and misery, and yet not be contaminated by it.

In conclusion, I would say, that we ought not to be disappointed if we do not see immediately from our system the results which we may think we have a right to look for. It is unreasonable to expect that all our towns or all our districts should at once come up to the standard which we have fixed in our own minds as desirable and attainable. It is the policy of our laws, and the only policy consistent with the principles of a free government, to allow to towns and to districts the management of their own schools, subject to such general rules as the common good may require. Compulsion is against the spirit of our institutions and of our laws. We might by the exercise of the central power of the State, force upon a town or district a school somewhat in advance of what the town or district would otherwise establish. But it will probably be found to be the wisest course in the end, to rely upon means of persuasion, to endeavor to influence the minds of the people by argument and information, and we shall thus make a progress peaceful and sure, though slow.

E. R. POTTER,

Comm'r of Pub. Schools. KINGSTON, R. I., January, A. D, 1852.

Providence,
North-Providence,
Smithfield,
Cumberland,
Scituate,
Cranston,
Johnston,
Glocester,
Foster,
Burrillville,
Newport,
Portsmouth,
Middletown,
Tiverton,
Little Compton,
New Shoreham,
Jamestown,
South Kingstown,
Westerly,
North Kingstown,
Exeter,
Charlestown,
Hopkinton,
Richmond,
Warwick,
Coventry,
East Greenwich,
West Greenwich,
Bristol,
Warren,
Barrington,

RECEIVED FROM

Expended on State Raised by

Registry Tax Unexpended

Total Expendedfor School Voted this
Treasury

Town.
Rate Bills. &c.

last year.

Resources, instruction, Houses year. 7,081 53 33,000 00

1,008 05

41,089 58 40,553 30 7,912 87 34,000 00 1,857 50 3,500 00 200 00 425 20

5,982 70 4,000 00 242 57

3,500 00
3,045 46 3,000 00 2,359 22 423 00

8,827 68 8,827 68 1,600 00 3,000 00
1,635 41 2,000 00
207 00 102 66 3,945 07

855 00

2,000 00 1,348 42 321 06 406 92 465 42 245 49 2,787 31 2,396 18 20 00 321 06 1,226 34 800 00

295 45

2.321 79 2,320 00 4,400 00 1,200 00 825 97 500 00

109 25

1.434 22

1,182 28 1,400 00 500 00 745 92 200 00 211 42 216 91 1,374 25 974 26

200 00 760 67 181 11 749 77 171 36

2,109 99 1,704 42

650 00 181 11 678 83 400 00 300 00 241 99

1,620 82 1,620 82 1,160 00 300 00
2,472 42 3,000 00 537 26 329 00 143 94 6,483 12 5,628 28 521 86

3,000 00
524 88 200 00 1,040 92 29 00 67 15 1,861 35 1,861 35

170 00 200 00
277 77 150 00 515 67 48 05 79 36 1,070 85 914 85 135 50 100 00
1,132 27 1,500 00 75 00 467 30 432 66 3,607 23 3,607 23

75 00

1,500 00 452 53 200 00 1,130 19 19 00 43 10 1,844 82 1,844 82

120 00 100 00 250 00 40 00

370 00

100 00 92 91 23 00 112 11 14 77

242 79 242 79

23 00 961 00 460 00

334 41 226 76 1,982 17
635 58 200 00
94 26 288 52 1,218 36 929 84

200 00
933 59 300 00 596 61 106 70 75 80 2,012 70 1,730 98 320.00 450 00
804 16 148 92
8 00 79 25 328 83 1,040 33 704 00

268 05
351 35 83 65 67 51 37 15 169 22 708 88 583 68 315 00 125 00
609 13 140 81
60 00 48 05 809 94 809 94

140 81
491 16 120 00 820 53 165 85

1,597 54 1,597 54

120 00
2,178 99 600 00

262 50

3,041 49 3,017 67 3,625 00 675 00 1.145 15 381 72 67 93 375 93 1,594 80

381 72 463 65 115 00 50 00 49 00 40 00 717 65 675 00

115 00
471 85 113 42
36 22 180 23 801 72

113 42
1,146 06 2,250 00 654 98 499 03 124 93 4,675 00 4,228 76 500 00 2,250 00
641 09 1,300 00

24 01
1,965 10 1,967 26

1,500 00 176 00 200 00 200 70

5 73 45 33 627 76 549 18

200 00 35,167 59 55,488 69 10,075 39 6,327 301 3,235 17/ 109,767 01 94,471 96 23,902 80)

Public Schools. Table No. 1, accompanying the Report of the Commissioner of

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Table No. 2, accompanying the Report of the Commissioner

of Public Schools.

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Table No. 3, accompanying the Report of the Commissioner

of Public Schools.

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81 over four.

Population un.

der four.

Population un

der fifteen. Idiots.

Attended School,

Cannot read and

write.

Insane.

Providence
North Providence
Smithfield
Cumberland
Scituate
Cranston
Johnston
Glocester
Foster
Burrillyille

ANO

894)

9,716 05 6,864 5,742 9,150 4,136 13,286
1,857 50 1,763 990 1,743 797 2,540 1 3
2,759 19 2,311 1,792 2,701 1,072 3,773 1 5
1,578 87 1,307 971 1,472

687 2,159 3 3
1,026 74 825 545 1,021 382 1,404 2 1
1,115 96

497 1,072 454 1,526 54 752 51 478 320 751 278 1,029 2 1 623 80 422 299 593 260

853

3 4 475 35 534 341) 457 193 650) 103

865 86 737 518 822 362 1,184 2 2 2,122 23 1,229 950 2,102 800 2,002

4 4 449 02 318 219 448 165 614 53

189 41 163 103 478 81 259 1
1,302 44 978 708 1,274 507) 1,781 24 2

356 87! 429 202 288 100 488 1
369 81 392 188 382 123 505 64
67 28 75 40 62 30 92 1

121 9 6,705

4 2 1.310
4 4 2,281

1,234
2 995

869 617 691 495 845

879 433 469 301 65 91

3 66 13 92

Newport
Portsmouth
Middletown
Tiverton
Litte Compton
New Shoreham
Jamestown

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166

378 273

3

Warwick
Coventry
East Greenwich
West Greenwich

1,755 86 1,313
841 00 658
544 82 366
324 70

908 1,793 413 841 2331

311

608 2,401 3 21
309 1,150 1 1
182 745 3
133 44412

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26.712 19,719 33.959 13,898) 47.857 108 681 233'55 28,331 3.744

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