The Family Library (Harper)., Volume 6

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Page 299 - May the great God, whom I worship, grant to my country, and for the benefit of Europe in general, a great and glorious victory, and may no misconduct in any one tarnish it ; and may humanity after victory be the predominant feature in the British fleet ! For myself individually, I commit my life to him...
Page 308 - you can do nothing for me." — All that could be done was to fan him with paper, and frequently to give him lemonade to alleviate his intense thirst. He was in great pain, and expressed much anxiety for the event of the action, which now began to declare itself. As often as a ship struck, the crew of the victory...
Page 307 - Hardy, who was a few steps from him, turning round, saw three men raising him up. " They have done for me at last, Hardy ! " said he. " I hope not ! " cried Hardy. " Yes," he replied ; " my back-bone is shot through...
Page 309 - And then, in a stronger voice, he said, "Anchor, Hardy — anchor." Hardy, upon this, hinted that Admiral Collingwood would take upon himself the direction of affairs. " Not while I live, Hardy," said the dying Nelson, ineffectually endeavouring to raise himself from the bed :
Page 308 - Hardy ; and as that officer, though often sent for, could not leave the deck, Nelson feared that some fatal cause prevented him, and repeatedly cried : " Will no one bring Hardy to me ? he must be killed ! he is surely dead...
Page 228 - A shot through the mainmast knocked the splinters about ; and he observed to one of his officers with a smile, " It is warm work ; and this day may be the last to any of us at a moment : ' and then stopping short at the gangway, added, with emotion — ' But mark you ! I would not be elsewhere for thousands.
Page 302 - Blackwood made answer that he thought the whole fleet seemed very clearly to understand what they were about. These words were scarcely spoken before that signal was made, which will be remembered as long as the language, or even the memory, of England shall endure — Nelson's last signal: — "England expects every man to do his duty!" It was received throughout the fleet with a shout of answering acclamation, made sublime by the spirit which it breathed and the feeling which it expressed. "Now,"...
Page 267 - I beg to inform your lordship, that the port of Toulon has never been blockaded by me : quite the reverse. Every opportunity has been offered the enemy to put to sea : for it is there that we hope to realize the hopes and expectations of our country.

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