The Storm Compass: Or, Seaman's Hurricane Companion : Containing a Familiar Explanation of the Hurricane Theory : Illustrated with Diagrams and Accounts of Hurricanes

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J.D. Potter, 1853 - Hurricanes - 56 pages
 

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Page 37 - Who can attempt to describe the appearance of things upon deck ? If I was to write for ever I could not give you an idea of it — a total darkness all above; the sea on fire, running as it were in Alps, or Peaks of Teneriffe; (mountains are too common an idea) ; the wind roaring louder than thunder, (absolutely no flight of imagination), the whole made more terrible, if possible, by a very uncommon kind of blue lightning...
Page 37 - If I was to write for ever I could not give you an idea of it — a total darkness all above ; the sea on fire, running as it were in Alps, or Peaks of Teneriffe (mountains are too common an idea) ; the wind roaring louder than thunder (absolutely no flight of imagination) ; the whole made more terrible, if possible, by a very uncommon kind of blue lightning ; the poor ship very much pressed, yet doing what she could, shaking her sides, and groaning at every stroke.
Page 31 - ... and jib-boom, the sails and rigging of which I put below, and indeed divested the rigging aloft of all top-hamper, and everything that could be spared — secured sails and hatches, close-reefed the topsails, and boats hoisted on board, and well secured. ' Done beforehand, all was done quickly and well. I...
Page 31 - Next day set in with light squalls, smooth water, but strong ripples. The afternoon was remarkably fine ; but casting my eye on the barometer, I saw it had fallen considerably since noon. I thought at first some one had meddled with it, though, looking again half an hour afterwards, I was convinced it was falling rapidly. Still the weather seemed very fine, and I thought it strange ; but I was inclined to trust to my old friend, which, by its timely warnings, had saved me many a sail and spar before,...
Page 34 - ... been carrying me to the westward, the storm-current certainly swept me to the southward, out of the course of the storm. " I regret that, being just now at a distance from home, I cannot avail myself of my papers, to give you the exact particulars of changes of the wind, barometer, &c. ; but this short practical study of a rotatory storm so impressed the principal features of it on my memory, that you may depend on the general accuracy of this rough sketch. (Signed)
Page 31 - K had meddled with it, though, looking again half an hour afterwards, I was convinced it was falling rapidly. Still the weather seemed very fine, and I thought it strange ; but I was inclined to trust to my old friend, which, by its timely warnings, had saved me many a sail and spar before, and at other times had often enabled me to carry on through an uncomfortable looking night. On this occasion it proved itself worthy of trust, and I should have had cause of regret had I neglected its warning,...
Page 30 - Hall's interesting account of the way in which he a voided falling into the heart of one of these gales. I have taken this account from the Nautical Magazine, a periodical publication which has largely contributed towards advancing our knowledge of the law of storms.
Page 31 - ... wind in the first instance at north, and afterwards, as the storm advanced and the ship went a little a-head, receiving the wind at WNW The dotted portion of the third circle will show how the ship at last would have the wind WSW Captain Hall says : — " When three or four days' sail from Macao, about noon, I observed a most wild and uncommon looking halo round the sun.
Page 31 - PM the barometer still falling, though sun failthe weather continued fine, I ordered the crew, employed in cleansing the ship and preparing for harbour, *" to strike top-gallantmasts and yards, mizen-top-gallantmast and jib-boom, the sails and rigging of which I put below, and, indeed, divested the rigging aloft of all top-hamper, and everything that could be spared. Secured sails and hatches, close-reefed the topsails, and boats hoisted on board, and well secured.
Page 30 - ... perfectly well understanding the nature of the storm he was approaching, and knowing his position with relation to the storm's centre, took in his sails, struck his yards, slackened his rate of steaming, and hove-to, waiting for the wind, which was NE, to veer to NW, as he knew it would do. He then bore up ; ran round the hindermost portion of the storm for Bermuda, and arrived there without sustaining any injury whatever, and gave me an account of what he had done.

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