Solitude Considered with Respect to Its Influence Upon the Mind and the Heart: Written Originally in German

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Page 321 - HAPPY the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air, In his own ground ; Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire ; Whose trees in Summer yield him shade, In Winter fire.
Page 321 - Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire; Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter, fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years, slide soft away In health of body; peace of mind; Quiet by day ; Sound sleep by night; study and ease Together mix'd; sweet recreation, And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 215 - So soon as that spare Cassius. He reads much, He is a great observer, and he looks Quite through the deeds of men. He loves no plays, As thou dost, Antony,- he hears no music. Seldom he smiles, and smiles in such a sort As if he mock'd himself, and scorn'd his spirit That could be mov'd to smile at any thing. Such men as he be never at heart's ease Whiles they behold a greater than themselves, And therefore are they very dangerous.
Page 322 - ... shade. In winter fire. Blest, who can unconcern'dly find Hours, days, and years slide soft away. In health of body, peace of mind, Quiet by day. Sound sleep by night; study and ease, Together mixt; sweet recreation: And innocence, which most does please With meditation.
Page 372 - Ev'n thought meets thought, ere from the lips it part, And each warm wish springs mutual from the heart. This sure is bliss (if bliss on earth there be) And once the lot of Abelard and me.
Page i - Solitude, où je trouve une douceur secrète, Lieux que j'aimai toujours, ne pourrai-je jamais Loin du monde et du bruit goûter l'ombre et le frais?
Page 144 - ... mafters, or which we can fpend •wholly at our own choice. Many of our hours are loft in a rotation of petty cares, in a conftant recurrence of the fame employments ; many of our provifions for eafe or happinefs are always exhaufted by the prefent day; and a great part of our exiftence ferves no other purpofe, than that of enabling us to enjoy the reft.
Page 186 - ... to our minds, and by pouring the warm and generous feelings of her heart into our bofoms, animates us inceflantly to the exercife of every virtue', and completes the polifhed perfection of our character by the foft allurements of love, and the delightful concord of her fentiments.
Page 138 - But a more refined and enlarged mind leaves the world behind it, feels a call for higher pleasures, and seeks them in retreat. The man of public spirit has recourse to it, in order to form plans for general good ; the man of genius, in order to dwell on his favourite themes ; the philosopher, to pursue his discoveries ; the saint, to improve himself in grace.
Page 129 - It is the power of attention which in a great measure distinguishes the wise and the great from the vulgar and trifling herd of men. The latter are accustomed to think, or rather to dream without knowing the subject of their thoughts.

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