An introduction to algebra

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J. Johnson, 1782 - 201 pages
 

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Page 27 - Now .} of f- is a compound fraction, whose value is found by multiplying the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators for a new denominator.
Page 177 - ... if the logarithm of any number be multiplied by the index of its power, the product will be equal to the logarithm of that power.
Page 3 - If the same quantity, or equal quantities, be subtracted from equal quantities, the remainders will be equal. 3. If equal quantities be multiplied by the same quantity, or equal quantities, the products will be equal.
Page 32 - Note. The whole number of terms will be one more than the index of the given power ; and when both terms of the root are +, all the terms of the power will be + ; but if the second term be — , all the odd terms will be...
Page 3 - ... 1. If equal quantities be added to equal quantities, the sums will be equal. 2. If equal quantities be subtracted from equal quantities, the remainders will be equal. 3. If equal quantities be multiplied by equal quantities, the products will be equal. 4. If equal quantities be divided by equal quantities, the quotients will be equal. 5.
Page 32 - ... and the product be divided :by the number of terms to that place, it will give the coefficient of the term next following.
Page 80 - If A and B together can perform a piece of work in 8 days, A and C together in 9 days, and B and C in 10 days : how many days would it take each person to perform the same work alone ? Ans.
Page 194 - And also, when 1 is borrowed, in the left-hand place of the decimal part of the logarithm, add it to the index of the divisor when...
Page 67 - Let the given equations be multiplied or divided by such numbers or quantities as will make the term, which contains one of the unknown quantities, to be the...
Page 34 - ... and set the root of the first term in the quotient. 2. Subtract the square of the root, thus found from the first term, and bring down the two next terms to the remainder for a dividend. 3. Divide the dividend...

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