Income Tax

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Nabhi Publication/Jain Book Agency, 1914 - 400 pages

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Page 545 - Resolved, therefore, that the rights of suffrage in the National Legislature ought to be proportioned to the quotas of contribution, or to the number of free inhabitants, as the one or the other rule may seem best in different cases.
Page 678 - ... property; also from interest, rent, dividends, securities, or the transaction of any business carried on for gain or profit, or gains or profits and income derived from any source whatever.
Page 434 - ... or from any profession, trade, employment, or vocation carried on in the United States or elsewhere, or from any other source whatever...
Page 116 - Taxes on everything on earth, and the waters under the earth ; on everything that comes from abroad, or is grown at home. Taxes on the raw material ; taxes on every fresh value that is added to it by the industry of man.
Page 595 - The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on income, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several States and without regard to any census or enumeration; provided that in no case shall the maximum rate of tax exceed 25 percent.
Page 116 - TAXES upon every article which enters into the mouth, or covers the back, or is placed under the foot — taxes upon every thing which it is pleasant to see, hear, feel, smell, or taste — taxes upon warmth, light, and locomotion — taxes on every thing on earth, and the waters under the earth...
Page 545 - ... in proportion to the whole number of white and other free citizens, and inhabitants of every age, sex and condition, including those bound to servitude for a term of years, and three fifths of all other persons not comprehended in the foregoing description, except Indians not paying taxes in each state.
Page 546 - Resolved, that each branch ought to possess the right of originating acts; that the national legislature ought to be empowered to enjoy the legislative rights vested in Congress by the Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate states are incompetent or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation...
Page 548 - That the right of suffrage in the first branch of the national legislature ought not to be according to the rule established in the Articles of Confederation, but according to some equitable ratio of representation...
Page 582 - The present assault upon capital is but the beginning. It will be but the stepping-stone to others, larger and more sweeping, till our political contests will become a war of the poor against the rich ; a war constantly growing in intensity and bitterness.

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