Hips and haws, or, Double acrostics, by various authors, ed. by A.P.A.

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Page 27 - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore. There is society where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar; I love not man the less, but nature more...
Page 51 - Within thy hearing, or thy head be now Pillowed in some deep dungeon's earless den; O miserable Chieftain! where and when Wilt thou find patience! Yet die not; do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow: Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live, and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies; There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou hast great allies; Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's...
Page 18 - Look, where he comes ! Not poppy, nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world, Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep Which thou ow'dst yesterday.
Page 34 - I pray thee peace. I will be flesh and blood; For there was never yet philosopher That could endure the toothache patiently, However they have writ the style of gods And made a push at chance and sufferance.
Page 65 - Below, a circling fence, its leaves are seen Wrinkled and keen; No grazing cattle, through their prickly round, Can reach to wound ; But as they grow where nothing is to fear, Smooth and unarmed the pointless leaves appear.
Page 91 - His hat was off, his vest apart, To catch heaven's blessed breeze; For a burning thought was in his brow, And his bosom ill at ease: So he leaned his head on his hands, and read The book between his knees.
Page 91 - What sudden chance is this, quoth he, That I to love must subject be, Which never thereto would agree, But still did...
Page 12 - And doubtful joys the father move, And tears are on the mother's face, As parting with a long embrace She enters other realms of love ; Her office there to rear, to teach, Becoming as is meet and fit A link among the days, to knit The generations each with each...
Page 37 - I'll tell the signs by which you may The wandering shepherdess discover. " Coquet and coy at once her air, Both studied, though both seem neglected ; Careless she is with artful care, Affecting to seem unaffected.
Page 94 - From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire ; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world...

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