The life and career of Henry, lord Brougham, with extracts from his speeches, and notices of his contemporaries

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Page 146 - But how much nobler will be the Sovereign's boast, when he shall have it to say, that he found law dear, and left it cheap ; found it a sealed book — left it a living letter ; found it the patrimony of the rich — .left it the inheritance of the poor ; found it the two-edged sword of craft and oppression — left it the staff of honesty and the shield of innocence...
Page 136 - There is a law above all the enactments of human codes — the same throughout the world, the same in all times — such as it was...
Page 97 - Such, my lords, is the case now before you ! Such is the evidence in support of this measure — evidence inadequate to prove a debt — impotent to deprive of a civil right — ridiculous to convict of the lowest offence — scandalous if brought forward to support a charge of the highest nature which the law knows — monstrous to ruin the honour, to blast the name of an English Queen...
Page 170 - Rouse not, I beseech you, a peace-loving, but a resolute people ; alienate not from your body the affections of a whole empire. As your friend, as the friend of my order, as the friend of my country, as the faithful servant of my sovereign, I counsel you to assist, with your uttermost efforts, in preserving the peace, and upholding and perpetuating the constitution. Therefore, I pray and exhort you not to reject this measure.
Page 146 - It was the boast of Augustus — it formed part of the glare in which the perfidies of his earlier years were lost — that he found Rome of brick, and left it of marble ; a praise not unworthy a great prince, and to which the present reign also has its claims.
Page 135 - Tell me not of rights — talk not of the property of the Planter in his Slaves. I deny the right — 1 acknowledge not the property. The principles, the feelings of our common nature, rise in rebellion against it. Be the appeal made to the understanding or to the heart, the sentence is the same that rejects it.
Page 129 - That the state of slavery is repugnant to the principles of the British constitution and of the Christian religion, and that it ought to be gradually abolished throughout the British colonies with as much expedition as may be found consistent with a due regard to the well-being of the parties concerned.
Page 21 - To me his lectures were like the opening of the heavens. I felt that I had a soul. His noble views, unfolded in glorious sentences, elevated me into a higher world.
Page 100 - ... they did not feel the least of all the members of the community — their grief was in truth too deep for utterance — sorrow clung round their bosoms, weighed upon their tongues', stifled every sound...
Page 117 - That is not the case now. Let the soldier be abroad ; in the present age he can do nothing. There is another person abroad — a less important person in the eyes of some, an insignificant person, whose labours have tended to produce this state of things. The schoolmaster is abroad ! And I trust more to...

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