Yale Studies in English, Volumes 44-45

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Page 257 - The First part of the Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster...
Page 134 - Bitter constraint, and sad occasion dear Compels me to disturb your season due : For Lycidas is dead, dead ere his prime, Young Lycidas, and hath not left his peer : Who would not sing for Lycidas? he knew Himself to sing, and build the lofty rhyme. He must not float upon his watery bier Unwept, and welter to the parching wind, Without the meed of some melodious tear.
Page 92 - Italy ; and there at Venice, gave His body to that pleasant country's earth, And his pure soul unto his captain Christ, Under whose colours he had fought so long.
Page 181 - Twas English cut on Greek and Latin, Like fustian heretofore on satin ; It had an odd promiscuous tone, As if h' had talk'd three parts in one ; Which made some think, when he did gabble, Th' had heard three labourers of Babel, Or Cerberus himself pronounce A leash of languages at once.
Page 47 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object : can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France ? or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt...
Page 42 - He rather prays you will be pleas'd to see One such to-day, as other plays should be; Where neither chorus wafts you o'er the seas...
Page 118 - And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses, not loud but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Page 197 - ... read This little story; And know, for whom a tear you shed Death's self is sorry. 'Twas a child that so did thrive In grace and feature, As heaven and nature seemed to strive Which owned the creature.
Page 161 - tis no idle jealousy. — Let him go. ARE. Oh, cruel ! Are you hard-hearted too? Who shall now tell you How much I lov'd you? Who shall swear it to you, And weep the tears I send? Who shall now bring you Letters, rings, bracelets? Lose his health in service? Wake tedious nights in stories of your praise? Who shall...
Page 38 - Now of time they are much more liberal. For ordinary it is that two young princes fall in love; after many traverses she is got with child, delivered of a fair boy, he is lost, groweth a man, falleth in love, and is ready to get another child — and all this in two hours...

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