The Works of John Locke, Volume 5

Front Cover
Thomas Tegg, 1828

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Contents

I
1
II
117
III
131
IV
207
V
212
VI
215
VII
222
VIII
227
XIX
347
XX
351
XXI
352
XXII
367
XXIII
394
XXIV
411
XXV
415
XXVII
416

IX
244
X
249
XI
267
XII
273
XIII
275
XIV
290
XVI
292
XVII
338
XVIII
339
XXIX
424
XXX
426
XXXII
434
XXXIII
440
XXXIV
443
XXXV
455
XXXVI
457
XXXVII
464

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Page 230 - And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Page 299 - Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac.
Page 232 - Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands ; thou hast put all things under his feet : All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field ; The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.
Page 394 - MEN being, as has been said, by nature all free, equal, and independent, no one can be put out of this estate, and subjected to the political power of another, without his own consent.
Page 340 - To understand political power right, and derive it from its original, we must consider, what state all men are naturally in, and that is, a state of perfect freedom to order their actions, and dispose of their possessions and persons, as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave, or depending upon the will of any other man.
Page 354 - The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever then he removes out of the state that nature hath provided and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with, and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property.
Page 246 - Unto the woman he said, I will greatly multiply thy sorrow and thy conception; in sorrow thou shalt bring forth children; and thy desire shall be to thy husband, and he shall rule over thee.
Page 339 - Political power, then, I take to be a right of making laws -with penalties of death, and consequently all less penalties, for the regulating and preserving of property, and of employing the force of the community in the execution of such laws, and in the defence of the commonwealth from foreign injury; and all this only for the public good.
Page 314 - And the LORD hath blessed my master greatly, and he is become great: and he hath given him flocks, and herds, and silver, and gold, and menservants, and maidservants, and camels, and asses.
Page 418 - ... the obligations of the law of Nature cease not in society, but only in many cases are drawn closer, and have, by human laws, known penalties annexed to them to enforce their observation. Thus the law of Nature stands as an eternal rule to all men, legislators as well as others.

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