The Life of George Washington, Volume 1

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Aug 1, 2005 - Biography & Autobiography - 408 pages
Author Washington Irving believed this, his monumental biography of America's first great military hero and president, to be his finest literary achievement. Indeed, it is a masterful work, a superlative life of George Washington, and stood as a definitive text long after its 1860 publication.Volume I opens with a genealogy of the Washington family, tracing its roots back to the time of the Norman Conquest, and explores the future general's education as a boy, his service in the French and Indian conflicts, and his participation in the early rumblings of revolution in the British colonies in America.WASHINGTON IRVING (1783-1859) was born in New York City to Scottish immigrant parents. Considered by some the "Father of American Literature," Irving is best known for his short stories, including "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle," but he also produced an extensive bibliography of essays, poems, travel books, and biographies.

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Contents

I
15
II
26
III
30
IV
37
V
43
VI
53
VII
57
VIII
64
XXVII
216
XXVIII
223
XXIX
229
XXX
235
XXXI
238
XXXII
244
XXXIII
248
XXXIV
253

IX
70
X
75
XI
83
XII
91
XIII
101
XIV
107
XV
117
XVI
125
XVII
140
XVIII
143
XIX
153
XX
158
XXI
166
XXII
171
XXIII
177
XXIV
185
XXV
194
XXVI
206
XXXV
259
XXXVI
267
XXXVII
278
XXXVIII
286
XXXIX
291
XL
297
XLI
305
XLII
313
XLIII
322
XLIV
343
XLV
355
XLVI
367
XLVII
374
XLVIII
386
XLIX
389
L
396
LI
401
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 261 - Plead my cause, O Lord, with them that strive with me : Fight against them that fight against me.
Page 207 - I am now, I believe, fixed in this seat, with an agreeable partner for life, and I hope to find more happiness in retirement than I ever experienced in the wide and bustling world.
Page 146 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 219 - Then and there was the first scene of the first act of opposition to the arbitrary claims of Great Britain. Then and there the child Independence was born.
Page 118 - Niagara; and having taken that, to Frontenac, if the season will allow time; and I suppose it will, for Duquesne can hardly detain me above three or four days; and then I see nothing that can obstruct my march to Niagara.
Page 76 - As to the summons you send me to retire, I do not think myself obliged to obey it. Whatever may be your instructions, I am here by virtue of the orders of my general; and I entreat you, sir, not to doubt one moment but that I am determined to conform myself to them with all the exactness and resolution which can be expected from the best officer." . . . "I made it my particular care,

About the author (2005)

Washington Irving, one of the first Americans to achieve international recognition as an author, was born in New York City in 1783. His A History of New York, published in 1809 under the name of Diedrich Knickerbocker, was a satirical history of New York that spanned the years from 1609 to 1664. Under another pseudonym, Geoffrey Crayon, he wrote The Sketch-book, which included essays about English folk customs, essays about the American Indian, and the two American stories for which he is most renowned--"The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" and "Rip Van Winkle." Irving served as a member of the U.S. legation in Spain from 1826 to 1829 and as minister to Spain from 1842 to 1846. Following his return to the U.S. in 1846, he began work on a five-volume biography of Washington that was published from 1855-1859. Washington Irving died in 1859 in New York.

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