The Limits of Death: Between Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

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Joanne Morra, Mark Robson, Marquard Smith
Manchester University Press, 2000 - Philosophy - 254 pages
The Limits of Death brings together specific moments in contemporary cultural theory, continental thought, literature, art, photography, film, and music to engage a discussion about the nature of death. This book addresses the thought of influential figures in modern philosophy, focusing on the possibility of knowing and experiencing death. It explores the ways that consideration of the material body, the human, and the post-human impacts upon attempts to conceptualize death. It also offers a series of narratives that endeavor to speak with the dead, through emotive encounters with the very borders of death itself.

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Contents

To die laughing
3
The impossibility of Levinass death
22
the thirteen stations
40
Dead time a ghost story
57
Deaths incessant motion
79
Freuds metapsychology of the drives
106
sex death and Wagnerian androgyny
130
The last hours
144
Execution and fiction
167
translating my father
198
Deadly tales
220
To be announced
234
Index
253
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About the author (2000)

Joanne Morra lectures in Modern and Contemporary Art and Theory in the School of Art, Publishing, and Music at Oxford Brookes University.

Mark Robson is Lecturer in English at the University of Nottingham.

Marquand Smith is an editor at Reaktion Books in London.

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