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V.

3. 5. 16.

Rauish, I) To enrapture. Respire, v. 1) To exhale.

I. 3. 3. 4. 244.

41. 2) To transport, snatch away, in 2) To inhale. 4. 8. 20. both lit. and fig. senses.

Resume, v. Absol., to take back. (Here translates Horace, Sat. 2. I. 5. 3. 155. 10, rapit.)

Retire, v. tr. To draw back; Rauisht, pp. + Snatched away; cause to return. Arch. 4. 9. 91. seized and carried off. I. 3. 73.

*Retrograde, adj. 5. 3. 285, 484 Raze, v. Fig., to erase or obliter- (cf. note), 486. ate. Obs. ? 4. 9. 19.

Rid, pp. An obs. or dial. form of Read, v. †To recommend, advise. Ridden. 4. 7. 4. I. 3. 70.

Right, adj. Genuine, real. Obs. +Reasonable, adv. Reasonably. or arch. 4. 5. 107. 2. 1. 136.

Right, adv. Thoroughly, really, *Reciprocall, adj. 5. 3. 484 (cf. very. Arch. or dial. 3. 4. 229. note), 486.

Risse, pp. An obs. pp. of Rise. Recouer, v. 1) To recollect, re- E. 22. call. 3. I. 47.

Riuall, n. tOne having a com2) Absol., to cause to recover mon right or privilege with another. (spirit). Obs.? 3. 4. 171.

1. 2. 27. Rector, n. A ruler. Rare. 5. 2. Rob, v. †To steal (something); 43.

take (something) away unlawfully. Relinquish, v. intr. [a. Lat. re- 3. 5. 70.

quere, to leave.) -An affectation +Rode, n. An inroad, incursion. for 'to depart, withdraw from com- 3. 5. 61. pany. 2. 2. 233.

Rooke, n. †A simpleton; gull. Relish, v. intr. †To have a flavor; [CD. quotes: 'An arrant rook, by to seem. 4. 3. 19.

this light, a capable cheating-stock; Remember, v. Reflexively: to a man may carry him up and down call to one's own mind; be re- by the cars like a pipkin. Chapminded. 3. 1. 204. Phr., Be re

man, May-Day, 3. 2.] membered: to recollect. 2. 1. 61-2.

Rowle powle, n. (Roly-poly?) Remit, v. To omit. 3. 1. 61.

A low fellow. 1. 2. 26–27. Cf. note. Remora, n. The sucking fish,

Rue, n. Pity. Obs. or prov. 3. Echeneis remora. See Land-Re

4. 229. mora, supra, and cf. note. 3. 2. 6. Reposed, pp. adj. Settled and

Ruffe, n. 'A projecting band or composed. Arch. 3. 5. 35.

frill, plaited or bristling, especially Resolue, v. tr.

+To free from one worn around the neck. In the doubt or perplexity; inform. 4. 2. 20. sixteenth century ruffs of muslin or

Respect, v. 1) To design, pur- lawn, often edged with lace, plaited pose. 2. I. 58.

or goffered, and stiffly starched, 2) To consider, regard, pay atten- were worn by both men and women, tion to. Passim.

some of them very broad, projecting

I. 2. 18.

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I. 2.

122.

six inches or more in all directions.' tScroile, n. [Orig. prob. ‘a scrofCD. 4. 1. 7. Cf. note.

ulous fellow,' f. Lat. scrofulae, Rug, n. +Coarse woolen cloth; scrofulous swellings.) A wretch; frieze. 3. 1. 66. Cf. note.

mean fellow. 4. 3. 35.

Seated, pp. Situated, located. s

2. I. 8. Sack, n. A loose gown. 4. 1. 6.

Sent, v. An obs. form of Scent. Cf. note.

To smell (out). (The spelling Sent Sadnesse, n. +Seriousness.

4.

keeps nearer to the original Lat.

sentire, to perceive by the senses.)
Safelier, adv. More safely. Obs. 5. 3. 55.
or arch.
1. 3. 47.

Sentence, n. A pithy saying;
Sate, v.
Preterit of Sit. Obs. or

maxim. I. 2. 103
arch. A.D. 143.

Sermon, n.

A satirical poem. Satisfaction, n. Atonement. 5.

[Cf. Horace, Epist. 2. 2. 60.) 3; I. 3. 603 .

26. Satyre, n. 1) †A writer of satires Sesterce, n. A sestertius, a large 3. 5. 2; 5. 3. 386.

Roman copper coin, equivalent to 2) A satirical poem. 3. 5. 41, 100. four asses, or about five cents in

3) Specifically: one of Jonson's American money. 4. 7. 9. PL., ‘Comicall Satyres. 3. 4. 205; 4. 3. sesterces, 3. 4. 196; sesterties, 3. 4.

64. 4) A satyr (with quibble). 3. 4.

Set, v. Phr., Sets off: appears. 387.

A.D. 20. Say, v. +Phr., Well said: well Setter, n. A man who 'points,' done, a commendatory exclamation. or indicates victims for his master 2. I. 20–21, et passim.

or for his confederates. I. 2. 197. tSay, v. To essay, endeavor. Cf. note.

Setting forth, v. phr. †Furnish†'Sbodie, interj. God's body. 2. ing; adornment. Obs. 2. 2. 217. I. 79.

Shew, v. Show. Arch. 2. I. 95, Scant, adv. Scarcely; hardly. et passim. 4. 3. 71.

Shifter, n. A trickster, dodger, tScape, v. Escape. 3. I. 217.

(Cf. Shift, the 'threadScarabe, n. A beetle. It bare shark’ in Every Man out of his supposed to be bred in and to feed Humour.) 3. 4. 189. on dung; hence the name was often

Shine, n.

Brightness, splendor. applied opprobriously to persons. Arch. E. II. CD. 4. 7. 51.

Shoo'd, v. A form of Should. Schoole-like, adj. Pertaining to 3. I. 183. the schools or the schoolmen. 5. I. tShot-clogge, n. A person tol129.

erated only because he pays the Scold, n. A noisy, railing woman. shot, or tavern reckoning, for the 4. 5. 214.

company. 1. 2. 18. Cf. note.

A.D. 215.

cozener.

was

4. 9. 108.

or

Shot-free, adj. Scot-free. A.D. *Snotterie, n.

(f. snot, nasal 25. Cf. note.

mucus.] Filthiness. 5. 3. 293, 501 +Silkenesse, n. Silkiness: used (cf. note), 507. humorously, simulating such titles

Snuffer, n. +Prob. here, a dish as 'your highness,' to imply lux- for holding snuff.

2. I. 61.

Cf. uriousness, etc. CD. 3. 1. 261. note.

Silly, adj. Foolish, but with the Sock, n. (a) A light shoe or added arch. sense of weak, impotent. slipper worn by actors in the ancient

comedy; (b) nether stocks. 3. 4. Sinnewe, n. A nerve. (It is 325. in some cases difficult to determine Sodaine, adv. An obs. variant of whether Jonson has in mind the Sudden. 4. 5. 191, et passim. older meaning 'nerve, or the pres- Soothe, v. †To indulge and enent meaning 'tendon.') 1. 3. 75, et courage. 4. 5. 224; 4. 6. 55. passim.

Sort, n. †A set, company, pack. Sirra (h, n. A word of address, 1. 2. 219, et passim. almost equivalent to 'fellow' Sounding, n. A flourish of trum'sir,' used in anger or contempt. pets in the old theatre. Ist S.D. Obs. or arch. 1. 2. 32, et passim.

Cf. note. +Skelder, v. 1) intr. To prac- Soueraigntie, n. tControl, mastise begging, esp. under the pretense tery. 2. 2. 16. Cf. note. of being a wounded or disbanded Sower, adj. (Sour.) Satirical; soldier; play the swindler. CD. bitter. 3. 5. I. 1. 2. 52. Skeldring, 5. 3. 189.

Sparke, n. A gay and sprightly 2) tr. To swindle, etc. 3. 4. 167. young man.

1. 2. 215. Skil, v. To make a difference; Spermacete, n. A fatty subhave significance. Obs. or arch. stance found in the head of the

sperm whale, used in ointments and Skill, n.

Discernment; knowl- cosmetics. Here, a term of endearedge. 4. 6. 36.

ment. 2. I. 72. Skinker, n.

A server of drink; Spight, n. An obs. form of Spite. a tapster. Obs. or dial. 4. 5. 139. E. 60, et passim.

P'Slid, interj. God's (eye) lid. Spight, v. To hate. Rare. 5. 3. 3. I. 3.

478. #S'light, interj. God's light. 3. Spright, n. Obs. form of Sprite. 1. 83; 4. 3. 16 ('Slight).

Spirit; wit. 3. I. 12. Sling, n. A piece of artillery in t'Sprecious, interj. God's preuse in the sixteenth century. CD. cious (blood, life, etc.) 2. 1. 134. 4. 1. 26. Cf. note.

*Spurious, adj. 5. 3. 293, 501 (cf. Smart-tongu'd, adj. Having a note), 507. sharp tongue; given to the use of Square, adj. Proper; specious. biting speech. Arch. 4. 5. 107.

4. 6. 73. *Snarlimg gusts, n. phr. 5.3.546.

Staffe, n. †A stanza. 2. 2. 170. Cf. note.

Stager, n. A player. 3. 4. 196,

3. 4. 188.

3. I. 8.

et passim. (In I. 2. 17, possibly a Sunke, adj. Sunken. E. 4. gallant who haunts the theatre.) Sute, v. (a) † To dress, clothe;

Stalker, n. A player—so called fit out with apparel; (b) to be. because of his imposing stride. come; befit. I. 2. 149. 3. 4. 132, 293.

Supersedeas, n. In law, a writ Stalking, adj. †Fit for the mouth having in general the effect of a of a 'stalker' or player; tragic; command to stay, on good cause bombastic. 3. 4. 174.

shown, some ordinary proceedings Stall, n. A depository. 3. I. 114. which ought otherwise to have pro

Stand, n. A robbery. (Prob. ceeded. CD. 1. 3. 19. from the highwayman's command, Surcease, v. To cease; make Stand! or, Halt!) Cf. mod. slang. an end. Obs. or arch. 3. 5. 7. 'a hold-up.' Obs.? A.D. 49. Swagg(e)rer, n. A blusterer,

Starch, v. Phr., Starch you: to bully, bravo. (Used in compliment starch clothes for you. 4. I. 19. by Tucca, as the term 'sport' among Stiffe-toe, n. †A nickname for certain classes to-day.)

1. 2. 88, an actor. 3. 4. 187, 321.

et passim. Stile, n. A stilus, pen. 3. 5. 65 Swell, v. tr. To fill. I. I. 81; (cf. note); A.D. 84.

Still, adv. 1) Continually; al- Swown, v. ME. form of Swoon, ways. Arch.

2. I. II; 3. I. 246, to faint. 2. 2. 192. et passim.

Sycophant-like, adj. Parasitical; 2) Yet. 1. 3. 64, et passim. servile. 5. 3. 112.

#Stinkard, n. One who stinks; a low fellow. 1. 2. 34, et passim.

T. Straight, adj. † Strait, in the

Tabacco, n. Tobacco. (Cf. Fr. sense of tight. 3. 4. 262.

tabac, It. tabaco, Sp. tabaco, etc.) Straight-bodied, adj. bodied: close-fitting. 4. I. 4.

Table, n. A tablet or slab, esp. *Strenuous, adj. 5. 3. 302, 520 one designed to bear an inscription. (cf. note), 522.

3. 5. 55. Strooke, pp. Obs. pp. of Strike.

Taile, n. Phr., In taile of: im1. 3. 71; A.D. 37.

mediately after. 5. 2. 56. Cf. note. Stumpe, n. A nickname for the

Tall, adj. Bold, sturdy. 3. 2. 24. elder Ovid, possibly in allusion to Tankerd-bearer, 1. One who, his walking stiffly, as an old man. when London was very imperfectly Obs. or dial. ? I. 2. 169.

supplied with water, fetched water Stut, v. To stutter. Arch. 01 in tankards, holding two or three prov. 4. 5. 79.

gallons, from the conduits and Sufficiencie, n. A kind of knowl- pumps in the street. Such persons edge or discipline that gives ability were compelled to wait their turn or efficiency. Arch.

I. 2. 132. to draw water. CD. 4. 3. 117. Sugred, adj. Sweet; alluring. Taphouse, n. A drinking-house; Arch, or poet. 4. 2. 55.

tavern. Rare.

1. 2. 90.

Strait-A.D. 159.

Tir'd, PP.

n.

V.

a

Tartarous, adj. Like a Tartar;

Pounced (upon); barbarous, cruel. Obs. or arch. made a prey. 4. 3. 15. 5. I. 103.

Tire, n. A head-dress. (Cf. Taste, v. To prove; test, try. tiara.) Arch.

3. I. 50. 3. 1. 172 (fig., cf. note); 5. 3. 561. 'Tis, v. It is, i. e., he is. Obs.

Tauerne-like, adj. Vulgar; char- or arch. 3. 4. 400; 5. 3. 161. acterized by a want of taste. 2. I. 117. † Torture, n. (A printer's blunTeare, v. Tor rave, bluster.

Now der?) A torturer. 3. I. 275. colloq. 3. 4. 156.

Tother, adj. (A form arising +Teare-mouth, A ranter; from the mis-division of that other, one who tears a passion to tatters. ME. also thet other, as the tother. 3. 4. 135.

CD.) Other. Arch. 2. I. 66. Tearme, n. An obs. form of Touch, v. To put to the proof. Term. Here, prob., = epithet. 5. 3. 90. A.D. 21.

Toward, adj. † Coming; at hand. Tell, v. To count. Arch., exc. 4. 5. 177. in phrases such as 'to tell beads.' Traine, n. A wile, plot. 4. 7. 47. I. 2. 224.

Transcend, fTo ascend, Tempest, v. To fall like mount. 5. 2. 32. tempest; to storm. Rare. 5. 1. 52. Transpos’d, pp. †Transferred ?

Terse, adj. [a. Lat. tersus, pp. or, subjected? 4. 9. 57. of tergere, to wipe, polish.) Smooth

Trick, n. †A trifling ornament. and neat? 3. I. 34.

3. I. 54. Thankes, n. pl. The use of the Trickt, pp. Drawn, as armorial plural form for the singular is obs. bearings; portrayed. I. 2. 57. 4. 7. 40.

Troth, n. Truth, faith. In troth, Thornie-tooth'd, adj. Railing; 1. 3. 8; good troth, A.D. 41. sharp-tongued; satiric. Nonce Troth, interj. In faith. Withword. 4. 3. 112.

out preposition the use of troth is † Thorough, prep. Through. 1. colloq. or lit., not vernacular. I. 3. 2. 124.

14; 3. I. 19, 99, 235. Threate, v. To menace (with). Troupe, n. A playhouse audiObs. or arch. 3. 5. 79.

Obs.? E. 57. Thunder, v. I ) intr. To speak Trow, v.

To believe; think. with a loud or rumbling voice. Added to a question to express sur3. 4. 252.

prise or impatience, as here, and 2) tr. To threaten or prophesy then equivalent to 'I wonder.' in loud and awful tones. 3. 5. 83. Obs. or arch. 2. 2. IOI.

3) tr. řTo assail with thunder Tumbler, n. †A kind of greyor thunderbolts. 4. 5. 129.

hound formerly used in hunting Timely, adv. Early, soon. Obs. hares; here, a nickname. I. 2. 197. 1. 2. 81.

Cf. note. Il Timoria, n. [Gr. τιμωρία retri- *Tumorous, adj. [a. Lat. tumor, bution, vengeance.) Retribution, a swelling.) Swelling. 5. 3. 405. vengeance. 3. 4. 247, 249.

*+Turgidous, adj. (a. Lat. tur

or rare.

ence.

or arch.

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