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3. I. 80.

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Man of warre, n. phr. A soldier. Melancholy, n. A gloomy state I. 2. 171.

of mind; esp. fan affected sadness, Mark, n. A marking or noting; one of the Elizabethan 'humours' note. Rare. 2. I. 169.

ridiculed by Jonson. 2. 2. 102; 3. I. Marmaset, n. (Marmoset.)

A 221. small ape or monkey. 4. 2. 60. Cf. Mercer, n. A dealer in cloths. note.

Mary, interj. The Virgin Mary. †Minsitiue, adj. Prim; affected. The name (usually written Marry) 4. I. 40. Cf. note. was used in expressions of surprise, Miserie, I) Wretchedness. asseveration, etc. 3. 4. 315; 3. 5. 93, 2. 2. 59. et passim. Marry, 3. 1. 141. Obs. 2) Miserliness; penuriousness. or arch.

Obs. or Scotch. See CD. 5. I. 63. Masque, n. 1) A masquerade ; | Cf. note. revel. Arch. 2. I. 67

Mis-gotten, adj. Misbegotten; 2) A cover for the face, usually unnatural. Obs. or arch. 4. 6. 58. of silk or velvet, worn at masquer- +Mis-prize, v. To misunderades. In Elizabeth's reign, masks stand, misconstrue. 1. 2. 118, 119. began to be used as ordinary articles Mistris, n. 1) A woman who is of women's costume. 4. 1. 22. loved or courted. Arch. exc. poet.

Master, n. A title of address. 1. 2. 49; 2. 2. 41 (Mistresse), et Master is now changed to Mister in passim. ordinary speech, and used in its un- 2) Approaches modern derogachanged form only before the name tory sense? 3. 4. 395; 4. 3. 32. of a boy, or by a servile dependent 3) A title of address applied to a to a superior. CD. Arch. 1. I. 4; citizen's wife: 2. 1. 99 (Mistresse); 2. I. I, et passim.

2. 2. 27, et passim. Materiall, adj. †Full of matter Moderne, adj. 1) †Trivial; trior thought; wise. 5. 1. 128. fling. 5. 3. 290.

Matterie, adj. Pithy; wise. 2) †Fashionable; 'up to date.' 3. Rare. 4. 5. 38.

4. 332. Meat(e, n. Food in general. Moorish, adj. Having the qualiObs. or arch. 2. 2. 220; 3. 3. 28, ties of moor; barren; wild. et passim. Cf. Sweat meates, 3. 3. 5. 1. 84. Fig., obs.? 27.

Moralitie, n. †A writing that Mee thinkes, v. phr. Methinks; has a moral aim or contains stricit seems to me. Arch. 1. 2. 59, et tures on folly and vice; a satire. passim.

5. 3. 141. Meere, adj. #Absolute, utter. More, adj. +Greater. A.D. 201. 3. 4. 305; 4. 3. 107; 4. 6. 71.

Mother, n. The hysterical pasMeerely, adv. † Purely, abso- sion (with quibble). 3. 1. 196. lutely. 4. 6. 70.

Motion, n. 1) †A puppet. 3. 4. Melancholicke, adj.

Afflicted 336. with melancholy. Arch. 4. 3. 4. 2) †A mountebank. 5. 3. 202.

a

n.

Motly, adj. Party-colored, like Numm'd, pp. An obs. form of the motley dress of a jester; hav- Numbed. 5. I. 63. ing a fool's character or mind. 5. 3. Nut-cracker,

One who 332.

munches nuts, esp. at the theatre. Moyle, n. An obs. variant of 1. 2. 192. Cf. note. Mule. 1. 2. 182, et passim. †Mummia, n. A medicinal prep

O aration supposed to consist of the Oade, n. Woad. A cruciferous substance of mummies or of dead plant, Isatis tinctoria, formerly bodies; hence, a medicinal liquor or much cultivated in Great Britain on gum in general. Here, a term of account of the blue dye extracted endearment. 2. I. 72.

from its pulped and fermented Muse, n. Poetic inspiration. I. leaves. CD. 2. I. 59. 1.46. Personified, 3. 1. 13, et passim. *+Oblatrant, adj. (ad. Lat. obla

Muse, v. To wonder. P. 5. trare, to bark at.) Barking; snarl

Musique, n. An orchestra; a ing; captious. 5. 3. 519 (cf. note), company of musicians. Rare. 2. 1. 521. 67; 2. 2. 208. (Cf. Musicke, in Obseruance, n. tObservant care; modern sense, 3. 4. 148.)

heed. 3. 5. 34.

Obserue, v. *To treat with reN spect and deference.

1. 2. 141. Neat, adj. 1) Pure, unmixed. *+Obstupefact, adj. [a. Lat. With neat wine=Lat. mero, Horace, obstupefacere, to stupefy.) AsSat, 2. 1. 9. 3. 5. 15.

tounded, stupefied. 5. 3. 548. Cf. 2) Complete; clever. 4. 3. 20. note.

Neufe, n. (A variant of Neif, Ocular, adj. Plain to be seen; neaf.) The fist or hand. Prov. public. 4. 5. 77. Eng. and Scotch. CD. 3. 4. 221. Odoriferous, adj. Fig., pleasing,

Neuft, n. An obs. variant of sweet. 4. 3. 82. Newt. 4. 3. 131.

Of, prep. 1) By. Arch. New, adv. †Anew. 1. 3. 14.

Night-rauen, n. A bird that cries 2) In. 3. 1. 253; 4. I. 28. in the night; prob. the night-heron, 3) +At. A.D. 17. or night-crow. 3. 4. 370.

4) Through; because of. Arch. Nitty, adj. Full of nits, or eggs A.D. 81. of lice and similar insects; lousy. Off, prep. A variant of Of. 3. 4. 359.

'Off appears casually from c. 1400, Nominate, v. *To call; de- but of and off were not completely nominate. 5. 3. 286.

differentiated till after 1600.' NED. Not, v. [OE. nytan, f. ne witan; 4. 4. 37. ic not, I know not. ME. not (in Officious, adj. 1) †Formal. 4. Skeat's Chaucer, noot) I know not, 9. 69. he knows not.) Know not; be 2) Meddling. 4. 7. 65; 5. 3. 19. ignorant. 3. 5. 57. Cf. note.

3) Over-zealous. 3. 3. 32.

2. 2.

200.

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Often, adj. Frequent. Arch. or Parcell-guiltie, adj. Half guilty;
lit. 4. 2. 14.

partly guilty. Nonce word? 5. 3.
On, prep. Of. 1. 2. 4; 2. 2. 433. Cf. note.
205; 3. 4. 345; 4. 3. 21.

†Parcell-poet, n. A poetaster;
Once, adv. +Emphatically: once mere rimester. 3. 4. 172.
for all ? A.D. 215.

+ Passingly, adv. Exceedingly.
Orb, n. 1) One of the heavenly 2. 2. 142.
bodies. Poet, or rhet. I. 3. 45. Patronage, n. †Custody; guar-

2) A circle. Obs. or rare. 4. 8. 9. dianship. 4. 6. 59.

Organon, n. An organ, instru- Pattin, n. (Patten.) A shoe
ment. 5. 3. 299.

with a thick wooden sole; a clog.
tOrnature, n. An ornament or 5. 3. 421.
decoration. 3. 1. 59.

Pedant, n. A schoolmaster (as
Out-landish, adj. Foreign, alien. always in Shakespeare). 5. 3. 381.
Arch. 5. 3. 570.

Pedigree, n. Antecedents; rec-
tOut-roome, n. An outlying ord. Obs.? 1. 2. 58.
2. I. 118.

Peece, n. Any work of imagina-
tout-terme, n. Appearance; ex- tion or art. A drama, Ded. A
terior. 5. I. II.

poem, 3. 4. 70. An image or concep-
Ouer-run, v. tr. řTo run or drive tion to be painted or described, 5. I.
(something) over. 5. 3. 629. Cf. 114.
note.

Pen, v. intr. To write. Arch.
Owleglas, n. Ulenspiegel, the 3. 4. 173, 179.
hero of a cycle of German tales and Pencil, n. A fine-pointed brush,
jests. 3. 4. 150. Cf. note.

used by artists. 5. I. 115.

Penny-biter, n. A petty sharper.
P

3. 4. 372–3.
Pack-needle, n. A large curved Perruke, n. (Peruke.) A wig.
needle for sewing up packages. Obs. exc. hist. 5. 3. 32. Cf. note.
2. I. 52.

Perstemptuous, adj. Tucca's
Palme, n. Honor; triumph. (A blunder for presumptuous. Nonce
leaf or branch of the palm tree was word. 3. 4. 151.
used anciently as a symbol of vic- ||Petasus, n. [Gr. TÉTODOS; Lat.
tory.) 5. 3. 331, 376.

petasus.) A broad-brimmed felt
Panch, n. An obs. or dial. form hat, worn by Greek shepherds and
of Paunch. I. 2. 22.

hunters, and ascribed also to
Paralell, n. I) †A social equal. Hermes. 4. 4. 15.
1. 2. 31.

Phansie, n. [Contr. of fantasy,
2) Something similar; a counter- ad. Lat. phantasia, a making visible.]
part. 3. 1. 96.

1) A fiction, or fantasy; an illu-
||Paranomasie, n. (Paronoma- sion. 4. 6. 72 (phansy).
sia.) Word-play. 3. I. 97. Cf. 2) Inclination, liking; "fancy.'
note.

4. 9. 57.

Phantasie, n. Fantasy; extrava- 1) To give precedence or prefergant fancy. 4. 6. 4.

ence to. Arch. 2. 2. 2. Pilcher, n. One who wears a 2) To advance; exalt; promote. pilch, or coarse cloth or leather 4. 5. 148; 5. 2. 38. jerkin. Arch. 3. 4. 5; 5. 3. 422. 3) To choose. 4. 6. 75. Cf. note.

Presented, pp. *Represented, Pinnion, n. Opinion. Nonce personated. 3. 4. 213. word. 2. I. 27.

Presently, adv. Immediately, at Pish, v. tr. To express contempt once. Arch. 2. 2. 208, et passim. for. Rare. 5. 3. 78.

President, n. +A presiding or Pish, interj. An expression of ruling spirit. 5. I. 39. contempt. 5. 3. 77.

Pre'thee, v. A corruption of Pray Plagiary, n. A plagiarist. Arch. thee = I pray thee. 2. I. 125. Arch. 4. 3. 99.

Pray thee, 1. 2. 226, et passim; 'Pray Plausible, adj. [a. Lat. plausi- thee, 5. 3. 101. bilis, pleasing, acceptable.) +Pleas- Prettie, adj. 1) Clever; exceling, acceptable. 4. 9. 40.

lent. Obs. or arch. 3. 1. 28. Play-dresser, n. One who re- 2) +Strong, robust. 5. 3. 551. hashes old plays. 5. 3. 226–7. Cf. Preuented, PP. Anticipated; notes on this word and on Dresser, forestalled. E. 30. 3. 4. 339.

Pronounce, v.

I) intr. +De† Poet-ape, n. A pseudo-poet; clame; 'spout.' 3. 4. 224.

envious, imitating rimester. 2) tr. To utter formally. 5. 3. E. 35. Cf. note.

597. Point-trusser, n. A body ser

Prophet, n. A poet; an intervant who ties his master's laces. preter of the muses. 4. 7. 27 (cf. Obs. 3. 4. 223. Cf. note.

note); 5. I. 37. Poke, v. To urge. 2. I. 43.

Proportion, n. Form; consti† Poore, adv. Poorly. A.D. 20.

tution? 3. I. 29. Pothecarie, n. An aphetic form

*Prorumped, pp. [a. Lat. proof Apothecary. 3. 3. 8, et passim. rumpere, to break forth.] Broken (Pothecary, 3. 1. 154, et passim.) forth, burst out. 5. 3. 534 (cf. Arch.

note), 535, 536. Poult-foot, adj.

Forbidden to (f. ME. pulte, a Proscrib’d, pp.

interdicted pullet, fowl (cf. poultry) +foot.] have dealings with; †Club-footed; chicken-footed. 4. 7.

from. Obs.? A.D. 184. Cf. note.

Prospect, n. Phr., In prospect : Poxe, n. Small-pox; also ‘French within sight, view. 3. 4. 195. pox. In imprecations, equivalent

Prospectiue, n. (ad. Lat. proto 'plague.' 2. I. 152, et passim.

spicere, to look forward, look into Preasse, n. (Press.) Crowd,

the distance.] † Perspective? 3. I.

36. throng. 5. 2. 45.

Prouost, n. (ad. Lat. praeposiPreferre, v. [a. Lat. praeferre, to tus, principal, chief.] Chief, leader. place before.]

an

2.

5. I. 8.

Puckfist, n. A puff-ball; fig., an Queane, n. A jade, hussy, scold. empty boaster. 4. 7. 24 (cf. note); Arch. exc. lit. 4. 5. 214. 5. 3. 38.

Queere, n. An obs. form of Puet, n. Pewit, the 'laughing Choir. A company; synod. 4. 5. gull,' or mire crow, with play on 187. poet. 4. 3. 68.

Quick(e, adj. Living, alive. † Puffe wing, n. A puffed-up Arch. 3. 5. 110; 4. 9. 28. part of a dress, rising from the Quit, v. †To acquit, absolve. 5. shoulders, and resembling a wing. 3. 391. CD. 4. I. 17. Cf. note.

Quite, v. An obs. form of Quit. *Puffy, adj. 5. 3. 513 (cf. note), To repay, requite.

5. I. 46. 515.

† Quoth'a, interj. (Quoth he.) Pu'nee, n. An obs. form of Forsooth! indeed! originally a parPuisne, q. v. 3. 4. 325.

enthetical phrase used in repeating Puisne, n. (a) A judge of in- the words of another with more or ferior rank. Arch.; (b) ta fresh- less contempt or disdain. CD. 2. man at the Inns-of-Court. This is 1. 127. doubtless the sense in which Jonson Quotidian, adj. Daily. 5. 3. 136. here uses the term. 5. 3. 613. Cf.

R note. Punke, n. A loose woman; also

Raise, v. Absol., to cause to rise.

Obs.? 3. 4. 171. used as a term of endearment, but

Ramme, n. A male sheep: here, with derogatory sense. I. 2. 51, et

a nickname for a sheriff's officer. passim. Pure, adj. Cleanly (i. e., wont

Rampe, v. To rear, leap up, as to wash clothes clean). Obs. or

a wild beast. (Cf. Romp.) 5. 3. arch. 4. I. 20. (Cf. 4. 1. 8.) Purely, adv. Very; remarkably.

285. Cf. note.

Rand, v. An arch. variant of Obs. or prov. Eng. (CD. cites this

Rant. 3. 4. 177. passage.) 2. 2. 194.

Ransome, v. Pyramid, n. A style of head

+Rescue, deliver.

3. 2. 3. dress. 3. I. 56.

Rapt, v. sa. Lat. raptare, to seize

and carry off.] †To seize and carry Q

away. 5. 2. 45. Quack-saluer, n. A pretender in Rapt, adj. Transported. 3. 4. medicine; quack. 3. 4. 14.

286. *Quaking custard, n. phr. Fig., Rascall, n. I) A low fellow. a coward. 5. 3. 546. Cf. note. 1. 2. 27, 31, 56.

Qualitie, n. High birth or rank; 2) tOne of the rabble; a boor, good social position. Arch.

3. 5. churl.

I. 2. 89. (These senses are 131; 5. 3. 123.

difficult to distinguish: probably Quarried, PP. †(a) Pounced both occur in each case.) upon; made a prey of; or (b) pro- Rascall, adj. Base; worthless; vided with prey. 5. 1. 10.

Cf. note. /'accursed.' Rare. 3. 4. 229.

3. 4. 18.

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