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I.

or

Take your way; go about your tarius.') A petty or inferior grambusiness; or used as mere expletive. marian.

NED. 1. 2. 130. Obs. or arch." 1. 2. 192; 3, 4, 308, Gratulate, v. 1) Absol., to ofet passim.

fer congratulations. 2. 2. 17. Goll, n. A hand. 5. 3. 194.

2) tr. To greet, with ironic or Good man, n. Used as a title of sinister sense. 4. 7. 17. address, orig. to yeomen and farm- Graue, adj. 1) +Respected; iners; here ironic or derisive. 1. 2. 26, Auential; weighty. I. 2. 3. et passim.

2) An epithet of respectful adGood morrow, interj. phr. A dress. 5. 3. 170, 604. salutation used at meeting in the Grauitie, n. #Weight, authority. morning, equivalent to the later 4. 6. 73. Good morning NED. Arch. Grieues, n. pl. A plural form of 3. I.

Grief, current in the 16th and 17th Good yeere, n. Good luck; or, centuries, but now obs. 1. 3. 64; a time of prosperity; but perhaps 2. 2. 52. used quibblingly. 3. 4. 136. Cf. Groome, n. I) Servant; attendnote.

ant. Obs. arch. (But cf. Goose-faire, n. A fair held in Groom of the Privy Chamber, etc., certain English towns (still at in the English royal household.) Nottingham) about Michaelmas, 3. 1. 285. when geese are in season. NED. 2) A fellow, in opprobrious Also called Green-goose Fair. 3. 4. sense. 4. 7. 42. 145.

Guerdon, v. To reward, requite. Grace, n. 1) †A title applied to Poet. and rhet. 3. 4. 269. a princess. (A courtesy-title now +Gulch, n. [Cf. Eng. dial. gulch, only given to a duke, a duchess, or to swallow greedily; Ger. dial. an archbishop. Formerly used in gulken.] A fat glutton; drunkard. addressing a king or queen. NED.) 3. 4. 146. 2. 2. 145.

Gull, n. 1) A dupe, fool. 1. 2. 18; 2) Favor; honor. Arch.? E. 13; 5. 3. 332. 2. 1. 41; 3. 5. 136; 5. I. 33. Gract, 2) A trickster, cheat; pretender? pp. Honored. 1. 2. 172.

3) †Phr., Doe grače: to reflect credit on; do honor to. 2. 2. 96;

#Habilitie, n. Early form of 4) Phr., In grace: in favor. Ability. 4. 2. 35. Cf. note. 3. 5. 120.

Habitude, n. Mental or moral 5) Address? 3. 1. 43.

constitution or habit. 4. 6. 67. 6) Insinuating manner. 3. 4. 322.

Halberd, n.

A combined spear Gramercie, interj. Thanks. Arch. and battle-ax in use in the 15th and 3. I. 23.

16th centuries. 4. 4. 43. Cf. note. Grammaticaster, n.

[ad. Med. +Halfe-arms, n. pl. Short sword Lat. grammaticaster, 'scriba, no- and dagger? (Cf. 'small arms,'

5. 3. 616.

H

5. 2. 6.

I. I. 81.

I, I. 22.

side arms,' 'small sword.') 3. 4. Hindes, n. pl. Boors; 'the pro335.

fane vulgar.' (Here translating Halfe pike, n. A kind of short vulgus of Ovid, Eleg. I. 15. 33.) spear. 4. 4. 42. Cf. note.

Hand, n. Phr., At any hand: on His, pron. 1) +Its. The use of any account, in any case. 5. 3. 562. his with things, without personifica

Handie, adj. Hand to hand. tion, is obs. 4. 5. 149. 3. 5. 47.

2) †After a substantive, used in+Hanger, n. A loop or strap on stead of the genitive inflection. a sword-belt from which the sword 4. 3. 94. Obs. or arch. was hung. NED. 3. 4. 92.

Hold, v.

I) tr.

*To wager, Hard-fauour'd, adj. Unpleasing stake (something). 4. 3. 16. in feature; ugly. Arch. 2. 2. 105. 2) intr. †To observe, abide by

†Hart, interj. God's heart. 3. 1. (as a promise). 3. 4. 163. 79. 'Hart: 3. 2. 9.

3) intr. for reflex. To control Ha's, v. Has. NED. records oneself; forbear. Arch. 3. I. 260. haues, hafs, for 3rd. pers. sing. of Honesty, n. †Honor; credit; have, current from the 13th to the good name. A.D. 75. 16th century, and ha's seems to be a Honor, n. ‘With possessive prorecollection of these.

noun, = "honorable personality;" Heart of me, interj. phr. Used formerly (and still in rustic speech) to express surprise. 4. 4. 27. given to any person of rank or

Heate, n. +In mediaeval physiol- quality; now, a formal title for the ogy, a quality of ‘elements,' holders of certain offices, : 'humours,' and bodies in general. NED. 4. 1. 38. Here obs. NED. 5. 3. 405.

Hooke, n. †A rogue-catcher. Heele, v. An obs. contraction of 3. 4. 17. He will. 1. 3. 32.

Horn-booke, n.

A leaf of paper Heele, n. Phr., Strike vp his containing the alphabet (often with heeles: to trip up; upset. 3. 4. 20. the addition of the ten digits, some

+Herald at armes, n. phr. A elements of spelling, and the Lord's special title of the herald, with refer- Prayer) protected by a thin plate of ence to his duties at the tournaments translucent horn, and mounted on a -making proclamations, carrying tablet of wood with a projecting challenges, and marshalling the piece for a handle. NED. 4. 5. combatants. 4. 3. 155, 156.

71. †Here-hence, adv. From this

Horse-man, n.

A Roman eques. source or cause; as a result of this. 1. 2. 225. 5. 3. 365.

Humanitic, 1) Courtesy, Hieroglyphick, n. A nonsensical obligingness. 2. 2. 116. nickname, chosen prob. for its big 2) †A human being. 4. 2. 38. and enigmatical sound. 5. 3. 161. Humour, n. 1) †A mood natural

Hiew, n. An obs. form of Hue. to one's temperament; caprice, , Appearance, aspect. 3. 5. 99. whim; sometimes (cf. 1. 1. 17)

as

n.

II2.

122.

2.

q. v.)

merely state of mind or feeling. *||Incubus, n. A feigned evil 1. 2. 203; 3. 1. 6, et passim. spirit or demon (originating in per2) Appar. in modern sense. 3. 4. sonified representations of the night

mare) supposed to descend upon 3) Humours: a nickname for persons in their sleep, and especially Horace-Jonson, in allusion to his to seek carnal intercourse with plays. 4. 7.9; 5. 3. 37, 315.

women. In the Middle Ages, their 4) Humours: the plays, Every existence was recognized by the Man in his Humour, Every Man ecclesiastical and civil law. NED. out of his Humour. 3. 4. 205; 4. 3. 5. 3. 292, 484 (cf. note), 486.

Indited, pp. Accused.

Obs. or Humorous, adj. Full of humours arch. 5. 3. 222, 427. or whims; moody. 2. 2. 106, et Inditement, n. Obs. form of Inpassim.

dictment. 5. 3. 219.
*Inflate, v.

5. 3. 513 (cf. note), I

515. +1, prep. A weakened form of

Inflation, n. The process of beIn. 1. 65. (I faith =yfaith, coming, or the state of being, puffed

up with vanity or self-praise. Arch. t1, interj. Ay; yes. E. 3, et 5. 3. 371. passim. Cf. note.

Influence, n. 1) (a) Spec. in ||Ibides, n. pl. The ibis is a bird Astrol. The supposed fowing or allied to the stork and the heron, streaming from the stars or heavens inhabiting warm countries. A.D. of an etherial fluid acting upon the 206. Cf. note.

character and destiny of men, and Idi(e)ly, adv. (Obs. form of affecting sublunary things generally; Idly.) Foolishly; incoherently. 2. (b) Transf. The exercise of per1. 49; 5. 3. 591.

sonal power by human beings, lle, v. An obs. writing of I'll =I figured as something of the same will, I shall. E. 43, et passim (I’le, nature as astral influence. NED. I. I. 43).

5. I. 42. Ill, adj. Vicious, wicked. (Of

2) In modern sense, 5. I. 102. persons, obs. or dial.) A.D. 45.

Informe, v. ŤAbsol. To make Impale, v. To crown; encircle

known or tell as an informer or with a garland. Obs. or arch.

accuser.

NED. 4. 5. 113. 1. 83.

Ingage, v. To pledge, risk, put Impart, v. To bestow, share, particularly money or plunder. tr.

in gage. Rare. 4. 9. 83.

Intend, v. To fix the mind or 3. 4. 121; intr. 3. 4. 389. Arch.

+Impeach, n. A blemish or in- attention upon; devote oneself to. jury. 5. 3. 169.

1. 2. 148. Imputation, n. Phr., Doe impu- Interested, pp. Phr., Interested tation : to attribute a fault to. in: having influence over. Obs.? 3. 4. 218-9.

2. 2. 115.

I.

V.

5. 3. 161.

.

Intreate, v. 1) †To sue or pray Ierking, adj. fAccustomed to for (a favor). 4. 2. 32.

wield the rod, and hence, fig., to 2) To ask. 2. 1. 145, et passim. carp and cavil? 5. 3. 381.

3) To ask and prevail or obtain. Ioy, v. 1) tr. To enjoy. Arch. 2. 2. 151 ? 3. I. 64.

4. 9. 30. Intreated, pp. + Prevailed upon 2) intr. To rejoice. 4. 9. 47. by entreaty or solicitation. 2. 2. 112. Inuent, v. †To compose, as a

K work of literature. 5. 3. 377.

Kins-folkes, n. pl. Relatives. Inuention, n. The power of men- (NED. gives pl. 'kinsfolk' and tal creation or construction; inven- 'kinsfolks,' and calls the word rare. tiveness. I. I. 59.

CD. gives for the pl. only 'kinsInuiron, To encompass; folk. The form 'kinsfolks' occurs (hover over?). 3. 5. 96.

in our middle states, but all forms Inuite, v. I) To recall (to mind). are becoming uncommon.) 3. I. 199. 3. 1. 84.

Knaue, n. 1) A male servant. 2) †To ask and obtain or prevail. Arch. 1. 2. 29; 4. 4. 8, 18, 21. 4. 3. 146.

2) A rascal, scoundrel. 3. 4. 93. 3) In modern sense, passim. Knowledge, n. Acquaintance, It, pron. 1) †He. 'Tis, 3. 4. 400; friendship. 3. 1. 22. (Horace seems

to mean learning, and Crispinus to 2) Its. Obs. exc. dial. It selfe, interpret as acquaintance.) 3. 2. 26 (cf. note); A.D. 80. Iwisse, adv. [a. OE. gewis, adj.,

L certain; ME. iwisse, adv., certainly. Labour, v. tr. To work for. Cf. mod. G. gewiss.] Assuredly, Obs. or arch. 5. I. 129. truly. 1. 2. 58. Iwusse, 5. 3. 261

Ladie, n. 1) Vocatively. In the (cf. note).

singular, now only poet. or rhet.

NED. 2. 1. 93, et passim.
J

2) The feminine corresponding to Iade, n. A worn-out horse. 3. lord. 4. I. 39, et passim.

Laid, pp. Planned. 3. I. 164. Jaded, pp. adj. (a) Worn out, Land-Remora, n. (Lat. remora, and (b) tcontemptible. 1. 2. 252. a delay, hindrance.] One who

Iarre, v. An obs. form of Jar. clings like the sucking-fish, EcheTo tremble; strike together dis- neis remora. 3. 2. 6. Cf. note. cordantly. I. 3. 76.

'Lasse, interj. An obs. form of Iewell, n. A costly ornament. Alas. A.D. 30. In the general sense, obs. 1. 3. 38. Laxatiue, adj. +Loose, inconti

Terkin, n. In the 16th and 17th nent (of tongue). A.D. 76. centuries, a close-fitting jacket, jer- Left, pp. Ceased. E. 60. sey, or short coat, often made of Legge, n. (Leg.) A 'bow and leather. Arch. 1. 2. 196.

scrape.' 2. 2. 200.

4. 181.

as

Lemma, n. (Gr. Iñupa, Lat. lem- +Lotium, n. (Lat. lotium, urine.] ma, a theme.) A theme; the sub- Stale urine, used by barbers as a ject of an epigram. A.D. 117. ‘lye' for the hair. NED. 3. 4. 13

Lending, n. Something that has Cf. note. been borrowed;

a loan.
Arch. Louer, n.

I) A woman who is 3. 4. 29.

beloved. (In sing., arch.) 2. 2. 174. 'Lesse, conj. An obs. form of 2) Referring to both sexes: 4. 5. Unless. 3. 5. 123.

30, 32. Let, n. A hindrance, an obstacle. *Lubricail, adj. [ad. Lat. lubriArch. 4. 9. 6.

cus, slippery, deceitful.] Slippery; Lewd, adj. 1) Ignorant, rude. uncertain; wanton. Obs. or arch. 3. I. 115.

5. 3. 287, 489 (cf. note), 493. 2) †Scandalous; malicious. 3. 5. Lust, n. +A keen desire-not 129, 130.

restricted in modern

usage. Libertine, n. A person of unre- A.D. 45. strained and reckless conduct; here, Lyen, pp. ťLain; lodged. 4. I. perhaps, a slanderer, defamer. Arch. 44.

Cf. note. 1. 2. 55. Licentious, adj. 1) Unrestrained;

M going beyond all bounds. 1. 2. 55. Madam(e, n. My lady; lady: Arch.

originally a formal term or address 2) Libertine; lascivious. 4. 6. 54. to a lady (a woman of rank or

3) In senses 1) and 2) combined. authority, or the mistress a puse 4. 5. 14.

hold); now a conventional term Lieue, adj. An obs. form of Lief. of address to women of any degree,

&c. CD. Here, obs. In 2. 2. 30, Lighted, pp. Alighted (from a 138, 148, 152, applied to a princess; coach). Arch. or dial. 2. I. 178. in 4. 1. 37, to a lady of rank.

Like, adj. “Predicatively, const. **Magnificate, v. (ad. Lat. magto with inf.: That may reasonably nificare, to magnify.) To magnify; be expected to (do, etc.), likely to. extol; exalt. 5. 3. 297, 498 (cf. Now somewhat rare in literary use; note), 499. still common colloq.' NED. 4. 5. 132.

Make, v.

intr. †To compose List, v. To be disposed; wish. poetry. 5. 3. 377. Arch. 5. 3. 301.

Maker, n. †A poet; (a satirist). Locust, n. A nickname for a 3. 5. 136. young rascal, chosen prob. because Malic't, adj. Hated; made the the locust is a devourer and de- object of malice. E. 10. stroyer. 3. 4. 399.

Man, v. †To attend, escort. 4. 2. 3. †Loftie, adv. Loftily; with dig- Mangonizing, adj. Accustomed nity or elevated spirit. 3. 4. 173. to furbish up things for sale. 3. 4.

Lording, n. Sir; master. A 291. Cf. note on Mango, 3. 4. 317. title of respect, usually in pl., as Manner, n. Sort; kind. Obs. here. 2. 2. 89.

or arch. 4. 5. 16.

4. 3. 128.

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