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Disposure, n. tControl; dis- 18th century. NED.

Obs. exc. posal. 4. 9. 61.

hist. 3. 4. 337. Distaste, n. 1) †Annoyance, dis- Dump, n. (a) Melancholy; detraction, that 'leaves a bad taste pression (now only in plural); in the mouth. 5. 3. 171.

(b) perplexity; amazement? 3. 4. 2) Dislike; disgust. 1. 2. 62. 226.

Distinct, pp. adj. Distinguished;
differentiated. 5. 2. 44.

E
Dittie, ta ballad, poem.

Earnest, n. I) [a. OE. eornost, 2. 2. 170; 4. 3. 86, 98 (ditt). earnestness, zeal; glossed by Lat.

Diuers, adj. Various; several. serium, studium.] Seriousness; Now somewhat archaic, but well sober purpose. (Without prep. in, known in legal and scriptural | Arch:)

3. 4. 100. phraseology. NED. 3. I. 151. 2) An instalment of money, paid

Diuert, v. [ad. Lat. divertere, to to secure a bargain or contract. turn in different directions, and 3. 4. 179. devertere, to turn away.] To turn Element, n. One's proper sphere; away, in literal sense. 4. 6. 9. the class of persons with whom one

Diuision, n. †Variation; modu- naturally associates. 1. 2. 36. lation. 4. 5. 198.

Ellebore, n. [ad. Lat. elleborus, Doome, n. 1) Judgment; opin- hellebore.] A poisonous but mediion. 5. I. 139.

cinal plant; a powder prepared from 2) Sentence (of a judge). 5. 3. this. 5. 3. 403. Cf. note. 134, 596.

Emblem(e, n. 1) A person who Doubt, v. To anticipate with ap- is the symbol or type of some prehension; suspect or fear. Arch. quality or condition. I. 2. 222. 3. I. 278.

2) †A drawing or picture expressDrachme, n. A Grecian silver ing an allegory or moral fable. coin, varying in value but probably 5. 3. 59. averaging 191/2 cents. 1. 2. 160, † Embrion, n. An embryo. E. 15. et passim. Cf. note.

Endeare, v. *To attract and bind; Dresser, n. One who prepares, win the affection (of). 3. 4. 88, or works over (something). Arch. et passim. 3. 4. 339. Cf. Play-dresser, 5. 3. 226, Enforc't, pp. + Created as by a and note.

tour de force; 'trumped up.' Obs.? Dressing, n. The hair arranged 4. 6. 70. in some peculiar way. Arch. 3. I. Enforme, v. † Prob. inform, in 48. Cf. note.

the Lat. sense of delineate' and Drop, v. intr. To shed tears; hence 'describe.' E. 54. (Cf. In1. 2. 152.

forme, to disclose, tattle. 4. 5. 113.) Dubblet, n. A close-fitting body- Enghle, n. An ingle; a boy garment, with or without sleeves, favorite in bad sense. Arch. I. 2. worn by men from the 14th to the 17; 3. 4. 292. Cf. Enghle, v.

weep. Obs.?

E. 32.

Enghle, v. To cajole, wheedle. regarded as an aphrodisiac. NED. Arch. 2. 2. 236. Cf. note.

3. 4. 75, 398. Entertainement, n. †Acceptance; Errant, adj. Arrant; thoroughcountenance. 5. 3. 575.

going, with opprobrious sense. 3. 4. Entrailes, n. pl. 1) †The in- 115. ward parts regarded as the seat of Erre, v. [a. Lat. errare, in orig. the emotions, thoughts, etc. NED. sense of go, wander.] I) To

wander, stray. I. 3. 47. 2) The inner parts;

interior. 2) To go astray in judgment. Rare. 3. 4. 366.

5. 2. 37. Enuie, n.

1) †Malice; hatred. Essay, n. (Cf. Assay.) (a) E. 21; 5. 3. 647.

†A test, proof; (b) ta sample. 2) The feeling of mortification 4. 3. 65. and ill-will occasioned by the con- Estate, n.

State or condition in templation of superior advantages general. Arch. 4. 9. 22; 5. I. 65. possessed by another. NED. In Esteeme, n.

+Estimate, valua5. 3. 619, Enuie seems to partake tion: phr., Make that esteeme. of both meanings. (It is often diffi- 3. I. 174. cult to determine which sense Jon- Euert, v. [ad. Lat. evertere, to son has in mind; in Shakespeare overturn.) To overturn; disturb the noun occurs about as often in profoundly. 4. 6. 10. the one sense as in the other.) Euery, pron. Each one, every

Enuie, v. 1) To hate; show one. 5. 3. 241. malice toward; rail against. P. 27; Examin'd, pp. adj. Critically 5. 1. 78, 92; 5. 3. 472.

tested and proved. Obs.? 5. I. III. 2) To feel displeasure and ill- Exceeding, adv. Exceedingly. will at the superiority of (another Arch. 3. 1. 247. person) in happiness, success, repu- Excellence, n. +Excellency: a tation, or the possession of anything title of honor. 2. 2. 4. desirable. NED. Passim. Cf. Excellencie, n. +Excellence; surEnuied, pp. 4. I. II.

passing skill. 2. 2. 159. Enuious, adj. 1) †Malicious; +Excellent, adv. Excellently; spiteful. 4. 7. 10; 5. 3. 470. (This exceedingly. 4. 1. 3; 4. 5. 152, 153. is the usual sense in Shakespeare.) +Excessiue, adv. Excessively.

2) In modern sense. 4. 5. 156. 3. 5. I. (Both senses? 5. 3. 238.)

Exempt, adj. + Cut off from; Erected, pp. adj. Prepared; self- deprived of. 5. 2. 41. sustained? Obs.? P. 13.

Exhale, v. fTo drag out Erection, n. Advancement in away. 3. 3. 26. Cf. note. dignity or esteem. Obs.? 5. 3. 374. Exhibited, pp. Offered; done:

Eringo, n. form of Eryngo. an affectation. 3. 4. 155. The candied root of the Sea Holly Exhibition, n. fAn allowance (Eryngium maritinum), formerly for one's support. 1. 2. 79.

or or

Expiate, v. To cause to cease; 3) Shape, form. Arch. 3. 5. 105. make an end of. 2. 2. 234. Cf. note. 4) The action

process of Extrude, v. fTo thrust out of or forming or fashioning (esp. one's from, here unique in taking double thoughts). 5. I. 106. object. 3. 1. 288.

Fast, n. † The action of fasting; Ey-strings, n. pl. The muscles, abstinence. Rare. 4. 5. 15. tendons, or nerves of the eye. E. 28. * †Fatuate, adj. Silly, foolish.

5. 3. 519, 521. F

Fault, †Deficiency; lack. Facultie, n. 1) †A branch of art; Phr., For fault of: in default of; department of knowledge. 5. I. 18. through want of. Obs. 2. 2. II;

2) (a) Ability or aptitude; (b) 4. 3. 33. ta personal quality; disposition. Fawne, n. 1) ŤA cringing spy. E. 42; 3. 5. 20.

4. 7. II. Fain’d, pp. Obs. form of Feigned. 2) +Fawning speech; servility. 4. 6. 49.

5. I. 95. Faine, adv. Gladly; willingly. Feature, n. [a. Lat. factura, a Obs. or arch. 2. 2. 114, et passim. making, formation.] Something

Faith, interj. In or on one's formed or shaped, a creation. (Cf. faith.. Obs. or arch.

1. 3. 62.

facture, a thing made, creation.) Fame, n. I) Report, rumor; Arch. 2. I. 109. Cf. note. common talk. Rare. 3. 5. 60. Features, n. pl. General mental

2) Rumor personified. 5. 2. 75. qualities? Obs. ? 2. I. 76.

3) Reputation. 3. 5. 76, 129; 4. 7. Fellow-sharer, n. actor who, 54.

with the owner or lessee, shared in Familiar, adj. Acquainted. 3.4. the receipts and expenses of an 399.

Elizabethan play-house; a “houseFarder, adv. Obs. form of holder.' 3. 4. 256; 4. 4. 8, 11. Farther. A.D. 18.

Felt, v. Perceived by the sense Farthing, n. The quarter of a of smell. Obs. exc. dial. penny; the coin representing this Cf. note. value. (Until 17th c. chiefly a silver Femall, adj. A form of Female. coin; subsequently of copper alloys; † Simple, plain. 4. 2. 39. now of bronze.) NED. 4. I. 45. Ferret, n. (prob. ad. Lat. fur,

Fartingall, n. Farthingale: a robber; Mod.F. furet.] A young framework of hoops, usually of thief? Arch. 3. 4. 126. Cf. note. whalebone, worked into some kind Fetch, v. To derive, as from a of cloth, formerly used for extend source. Obs.? 3. 5. 108. ing the skirts of women's dresses; Fild, pp. (a) +Poured out; (b) a hooped petticoat. NED. 2. 1. 69. filled. 4. 5. 163.

Fashion, n. I) FOutward action; Fill, v. To put (wine, etc.) into mere form or pretense. 2. 2. 190. a vessel with the view of filling it;

2) †High quality, or breeding; hence, to pour out. Obs. exc. arch. social rank. 3. 3. 19.

NED. 4. 5. 133.

2. I. 18.

n.

115.

Fire, n.

A star. Poet. 4. 9. 83. Front, n. Forehead; face. Poet. Fist, n. “The hand, not neces- or rhet. 5. 3. 593; A.D. 156. sarily clenched or closed. Obs. exc. Frost-fearing, adj. Fitted to in jocular use. NED. 5. 3. 302. frighten away, or to hstand, frost

†Flaggon chaine, n. Prob. here, or cold. Nonce word? I. I. 83. a heavy gold chain worn about the Frump, Sneer; mockery. neck. (But NED. knows only the Court-frumps, sneers of the court following: ? A chain-bracelet to circle. 4. I. 12. which a smelling-bottle (F. flacon) Fulsome, adj. Disgustingly medcould be attached.) 5. 3. 42. dling. Obs.? 2. 1. 28.

Fleete, v. To pass away quickly; *Furibund, adj. Furious, raging. Ait. Obs. exc. poet. A.D. 157. 5. 3. 519, 521.

Fleshly, adj. (a) Material, as Fustie, adj. [ad. OF. Lat. fust, a opposed to spiritual; (b) pertain- cask. Cf. 'to savour of the foist,' ing to the present life. Rare. 5. 1. i. e., to smell of the mouldy wine

cask.) Stale; ill-smelling. 3.4.387. Fooling, n. †Preceded by an adj., Condition or humour for fooling. NED. 4. 5. 82.

Gable-end, n. †A style of headFopperie, n. #Foolish action, dress. 3. 1. 55. Cf. note. statement, etc. 3. I. 123.

Gallant, n. [ad. OF. galer, to Forbeare, v. †To have patience make a show, to make merry.] with. I. 2. 181.

(Forborne, pp. 1) A man of fashion and pleasure. 3. 3. 24. Rare.)

Arch. 1. 2. 51, 76. t'Fore, prep. Before; by: used 2) ŤA woman of fashion and in asseveration or adjuration. 3. 1. pleasure. 3. 4. 395. 221.

Gallant, adj. 1) †Fashionable; Forge, v. 1) Tr. “To fashion courtierlike. 2. I. 45. (something not material); to in- 2) +Indulging in social gaiety or vent. 4. 9. 98.

display. 3. I. 15, 16. 2) Absol. Invent(falsehoods); Gallo-belgick, adj. [ad. Mercurius devise (evil). E. 53.

Gallo-Belgicus, an annual register Formalitie, n. Regularity; con- first published at Cologne in 1588.] formity to legal custom. I. I. 16.

High-flown; outlandish. 5. 3. 574. Formall, adj. Regular, cus- Cf, note. tomary? Obs.? P.

'Gan,

Aphetic form of Fret, v. To rub. 3. I. 72. Began; pret. of Gin, to begin.

Frie, n. I) A crowd of insig- 5. 2. 56. nificant persons. P. 19.

Gathering, n. A collection in 2) Youngster, young rascal. Arch. money. Now dial. 3. 4. 362. Cf. 4. 5. 113

note. Fright, v. To frighten, scare, Generaltie, n. A general idea, terrify. Rare exc. poet. 1. 2. 61, statement, term; generality. 5. I. et passim (Frighted, pp. 5. 3. 291.) | 133.

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Generation, Breed; set. Glauering, adj.

Flattering;
I. 2. 39.

blandishing; deceitful. 3. 4. 322.
Generous, adj. [ad. Lat. gen- *+Glibberie, adj. (Corresponds
erosus, f. genus, stock, race.] *Well to Du. glibberig, mod. LG. glibbrig.
or nobly born (and hence, noble- Cf. Eng. glib = smooth, easy.) Slip-
minded?). 5. 3. 394, 601.

pery; untrustworthy. NED. 5. 3.
Gent., n. An abbreviated form of 287, 489 (cf. note), 493.
Gentlemen. 5. 3. 626.

Glister, n. A clister, injection.
Gentle, n. A person of noble or 4. 4. 41. (Cf. Clyster, A.D. 207.)
gentle birth. Here used in cere- Glose, n. (Orig. f. Gr. yawora,
monious address. 2. 2. 214.

tongue, language, etc.) Flattery;
Gentle-folkes, n. pl. Persons of flattering or fawning speech. Rare.
good family and position. (The 3. 5. 36.
sing. first appears in the 19th c.; Glosse, n. A sophistical or dis-
earlier writers used the pl. Folks. ingenuous interpretation. E. 40.
See NED.) Arch. 2. I. 55, 64. Goat-footed, adj. Having feet

Gentleman, n. A man of gentle like a satyr's. 4. 7. 10.
birth; properly, one entitled to God, n. As a title. Occas. pre-
bear arms, though not ranking fixed (without article) to the name
among the nobility. NED. 1. 2. of a deity (or of a person likened
30, et passim.

to one). Obs. NED. 4. 7. 6.
Gentlewoman, n. In strict sense: God-head, n. 1) Divine nature
a woman of gentle birth. 2. I. 89, or essence; deity. 4. 5. 103.
et passim.

2) A deity or divinity. Rare.
Gent'man, n. Gentleman. (Cf. 4. 5. 192.
gemman, not uncommon since 1500, #Gods a mee, interj. phr. God
and quite natural to the American save me? Used in protest or im-
negro.) 3. 4. 3, et passim.

patience. 1. I. 5, 38.
Gent'man-like, adj. Gentleman- TGods me, interj. phr. Prob. a
like, gentlemanly. 3. 4. 164.

shortened form of Gods a mee, q. V.
Gent'nesse, n. Gentleness : cour- 3. 3. 15..
tesy; good-breeding. 5. 3. 261. #Gods my bodie, interj. phr.
Gentrie, n. 1) +Gentlemen. 1.2. God save my bodie? 2. 1. 29.

Gods my life, interj. phr. God
2) Good-breeding ; polish of man- save my life? 2. 2. 13.
2. 2. 31.

tGod's my passion, interj. phr.
3) Quality of gentleman; knight- To express impatience: precise
liness. Arch. 5. I. 17.

make-up doubtful. 2. I. 113.
Ghest, n. Guest. 2. 2. 220, 221,

Goe to, v. phr. Used to express
224.

exhortation, remonstrance, derision,
Girt, v. To bind by favors con- incredulity. Obs. or arch. 3. 4. 60,
ferred; to obligate. Obs. or arch. et passim.
5. 3. 393.

Goe your (thy) waies, v. phr.

40.

ner.

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