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cence.

1. 2.

81.

upper part of the body, quilted and addressed, as in Shaks., 'bully Botstrengthened with whalebone (worn tom,' 'bully doctor.' Obs. exc. arch. chiefly by women, but also by men); NED. 5. 3. 160. a corset, stays; freq. called a pair +Bumrowle, n. Bumroll, a sort of bodies (bodice) a pair of stays,' of bustle. 2. I. 70.

Cf. note. NED., s. v. Bodice. 2. I. 70. Burst, pp. adj. Shattered;

Bodkin, n. A long hairpin. 3. broken. 3. 5. 23. I. 52, 58.

Buskin, n.

I) A covering for Booth, n. A temporary or make- the foot and leg reaching to the shift dwelling. 1. 2. 90.

calf, or to the knee; a half-boot. Bountie, n. †Kindness; benefi- NED. (a) Of the tragedian. 1. I. 4. 6. 62, 63.

18; 5. 3. 266. (b) For ordinary Braue, adj. 1) Worthy, excel- wear. 3. 4. 292. lent, 'fine.' Arch. 1. 2. 207.

2) Buskins : a nickname for a 2) Of high rank? Fine and ele- 'tribune,' or city magistrate. 5. 3. gant? Arch. 2. I. 145.

90. Bribe, v. (a) To obtain by hire By, prep. tOf; concerning; or reward; (b) fto extort; steal. against. 3. 4. 314; 5. 3. 72, 109. 4. 8. 28.

By-course, n. An irregular or Briefe, adj. Phr., Be briefe: disreputable course of action. be expeditious, quick. 1. 1. 8.

Bring knowne, v. phr. To make acquainted. Arch. 3. I. 251–2.

C Brize, n. (Obs. form of Breeze.) Caduceus, The herald's A gad-fly. 3. I. 261. Cf. note. wand carried by Mercury, pictured

Broker, n. retailer (obs.) ; with two serpents twined about it. esp. a second hand dealer, pawn- 4. 4. 14. Cf. note. broker. 2. 2. 236. Cf. note.

Caitiue, adj. (A form of Brooke, v. To endure; tolerate. Caitiff.) Worthless; vile. 5. 3. Obs. or arch. 4. 3. 91.

458. Bruit, n. Rumor, tidings. Arch. Cam’rade, m. (ad. Sp. camarada, 5. 2. 73.

orig. ‘chamberful, then ‘chamberBuffon, 'n. A buffoon; wag; mate’; F. camarade, camerade.) railer. A.D. 176.

Comrade, here with something of Buffon, adj. Addicted to low the earlier sense of chamber-mate, raillery. Arch. 5. 3. 382.

tent-fellow, and so associate and Bully, n. A term of endearment equal. 1. 2. 37. and familiarity, orig. applied to || Cantharides, n. Pl. of caneither

sweetheart, darling. tharis, a beetle known as the SpanLater applied to men only, imply- ish fly. The term here means a ing friendly admiration : good biting scoundrel. 5. 3. 436. Cf. friend, fine fellow, 'gallant. Often note. prefixed as a sort of title to the Cargo, n. A term of contempt name or designation of the person or opprobrium. 5. 3. 459.

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Carrier, n. A messenger; one Cheape, adv. A derivative of who fetches and carries. 1. 2. 173. the obs. n. Cheap, meaning 'bar

Case, n. 1) †An animal's skin gain. Cf. note. I. 2. 209. or hide. 5. 3. 651.

Check, v. To rebuke; censure. 2) †A pair; brace. 5. 3. 396. Arch, or dial. 3. 5. III. Cf. note.

† Cheu'rill, adj. Of the nature of 3) Phr., In case: in condition. cheverel-leather ;

yielding, elastic. Obs. or arch. 1. 3. 13.

1. 2. 137. , Cf. note. Cast, v. To vomit. Arch. and

Chide, v.

Phr., Chide at: to dial.

scold. 2. 2. 60. Catamite, n. [ad. Lat. Cata

Chiefe, n. The head or princimitus, f. Ganymedes, the name of pal part of the escutcheon, occupyJove's cup-bearer.) A boy kept for ing the upper third part of the unnatural purposes. NED. 4. 5. 66. shield ... NED. 2. I. 102. Cf. Catch-pole, n. [a. med. Lat.

note. cacepollus, lit. chase-fowl.) ] A *-, , sheriff's officer, esp. one who arrests (cf note), 507. for debt. Obs.? 3. 4. 18. Cf. note.

Choice, adj. I) Preferred Cates, n. pl. Choice viands, I chosen. 3. 5. 48. dainties. 4. 5. 41.

2) †Careful in choosing; disCensure, n. [ad. Lat. censura, criminating. 4. 8. 9. censorship, judgment.] Judgment,

Chose, pp. A shortened form of opinion, criticism. Arch.

Occasional in ME., but 3. 5. 123, et passim.

very frequent in the 18th c. NED. ||Centum viri, n. pl. Members

5. 3. 411. of the ancient Roman court dealing

Chymæra, n. A fancy, delusion. with common causes.

3. 4. 57. Cf.

1. 2. 206. note.

Citie mannerly, adj. phr. AcCertified, pp. + Reassured, satis

cording to the citizens' ways; bourfied. 4. 2. 66.

geois. 4. I. 35. Chace, v. intr. †To hunt? 5.

Citi-sin, n. Citizen (a quibble).

2. I. 127. Challenge, v. To assert claim

Clarified, pp. adj. Clear, refined; to; demand or call for. Arch. 5.

esp. high-pitched, thin. 4. 5. 5.
3. 52.
Character, n. A sign, an evi-

Clarke, n. Obs. form of Clerk. dence, esp.

of moral qualities. 4. 3. 122. Arch. 2. 2. 32.

Clem, v. tr. To starve. Obs. Charme, n. (ad. Lat. carmen, a

I. 2. 194 song.] A chorus, a singing in con

1. 2. 259; chosen.

1. 26.

Clog, n. A weight attached to cert. Arch. 2. 2. 216.

the leg or neck to impede motion Cheape, adj. Of slight value or or prevent escape. 4. 2. 60. account; phr., Make cheape: to Close, adj. Hidden or secluded. bring into contempt. 1. 2. 46. 4. 9. 47; 5. 3. 122.

exc. dial.

Closet, n. A private apartment Concluded, pp. [ad. Lat. con in the royal residence. 4. 2. 64. cludere, to shut up closely.) In

Cloth, n. tApparel. 3. 4. 376. closed; contained (in physical

Cloth, v. Obs. form of Clothe. sense). 4. 8. 2. A.D. 159.

Conference, n. Communication; *Clumsie, adj. †Benumbed or intercourse? Obs. 5. I. 125. stiffened with cold. 5. 3. 296. Cf. Confluence, n. tAgreement in note.

opinion; consensus. 5. 2. 40. *Clutch, v. 5. 3. 302, 540 Coniuration, n. [ad. Lat. con(clutcht; see note), 541, 542. jurare, to swear together, conspire.)

Clyster, n. An enema. Possibly Conspiracy; banding together unhere a syringe used for injection. der oath against a superior power. A.D. 207.

4. 4. 17. Cockatrice, n.

A loose woman; Coniuring, adj. Conspiring a mistress. (Orig. A fabulous mon- Pro. 8. ster reputed to be hatched by a ser- *Conscious, adj. 3. 3. 25; 5. 3. pent from a cock's egg,

298, 525 (conscious dampe; cf. and supposed to have the power of note), 527. killing by the glance of its eye; a Consent, n. Agreement by a basilisk. CD.) 3. 4. 202 (cf. note), number of persons; concert. 06et passim.

solescent. 5. I. 139. Collied, pp. (f. colly, to blacken

Consumption, n. Destruction. with coal-dust or soot. Cf. collow-(cf. Horace, Sat. I. 9. 33, consoot, smut.] Begrimed, blackened.

sumet.) Arch. 4. 5. 135.

Containe, v. I) †To govern; Come, v. +Phr., Come at [= keep under control. 4. 6. 60. Lat. accedere]: to approach, come 2) †To hold in regard. 5. I. 37. to. 3. 4. 347.

Contend, v. [ad. Lat. contenCommend, I) To praise. dere, to strive, strain.] 1) +To Arch. 2. 2. 35.

strive; endeavor. 3. 5. 12, 68. 2) To recommend to favorable at

2) (a) †To strive; (b) to comtention. 3. 4. 373.

pete, vie. 4. 5. 194. Commended, pp. Flatteringly

Contention, n. Competition, conreported? Arch. 2. 2. 93.

test, trial of skill. 2. 2. 163. Commiserate, v. To take pity

Conuert, v. [f. Lat. convertere, on, without object expressed. (This

to turn round.] To turn (the mind intr. use appears to be obs.) 3. 3. 31.

or attention). 3. I. 194. Committed, pp. Embroiled. (Cf. Lat. proelium commissum.] Obs? Copper-lac't, adj. Wearing copR. 12.

per lace for ornament, as did the Complement, n. 1) Compliment. Elizabethan actors. 3. 4. 214. Cf.

note. 2) † Anything that goes to make Coronet, n. PA style of headup or fully equip. NED. 5. 2. 20. dress. 3. 1. 56.

V.

E. 20.

a

.

Corps, n. [f. Lat. corpus, a inferior quality. NED.) A nickbody.) A corpse or body (not name used by Tucca. 1. 2. 47 (cf. dead). 5. 2. 86; 5. 3. 453.

note); 5. 3. 6. Corrigible, adj: Corrective. 2. Crudities, 1. pl. Imperfectly 1. 136.

'concocted humours; matter, or Cothurnall, adj. (ad. Lat. co- ideas, undigested or unassimilated. thurnus, a thick-soled boot reaching 5. 3. 555. to the middle of the leg, worn by Cunning, n. 1) Skill, cleverness. tragic actors in the ancient Athe- Formerly the prevailing sense; nian drama. NED.) Pertaining now only literary archaism. to tragedy. 5. 3. 291.

NED. Arch. 2. 2. 87, 134. Cot-queane, n. A coarse, mas- 2) (a) Knowledge how to do a culine woman; hussy. Arch. 4. 5. thing; ability, skill; Arch.; (b) 96, 128.

knowledge, erudition. A.D. 217. Cot-queanitie, n. The state of Cure, v. (f. Lat. curare, to care being a low, scolding woman, or for, cherish.] †To care for, cherish. cotquean. Nonce word. 4. 5. 129. 5. 3. 340.

Counterfeit, n. A pretender; Custard, n. [Apparently a peran impostor? 4. 6. 37.

verted form of crustade, with which Court-curle, n. A style of head- it is connected by the forms crusdress. 3. I. 54.

tarde and custad(e. The fashion of Court-frump, n. See Frump. the thing appears to have altered

Court-hound, n. A keen-scented, about 1600.] +Formerly, a kind of hungry courtier. 5. 3. 55.

open pie containing pieces of meat Courtly, adj. I) +Courtierly;

or fruit covered with a preparation court-like. 2. I. 133.

of broth or milk, thickened with 2) tOf, or connected with, the

eggs, sweetened, and seasoned with court. 2. 2. 221.

spices, etc. NED. 5. 3. 546. Cf. Courtly, adv. In a courtly man2. I. 148, 150.

phr., Quaking custard. Cousin, n.

Perhaps only kinsman, kinswoman. 2. I. 2, et passim.

D Obs. or arch.

Dame, n. I) A form of address Couey, n. (Covey.) A set or

originally used to a lady of rank, or company of persons. Arch. 5. 3.

a woman of position; the feminine 127.

, Crampt, pp. Affected as with corresponding to Sire; My lady,

Madam: cramp; gripped and wrung. 3. 2.

gradually extended to 26.

women of lower rank, and, after the Crie, v.

Phr. Crie mercie, used 16th c., left to these. NED. 4. 6. in explanation or apology. Obs. 24. 2. I. 19, et passim.

2) A female ruler. 5. 2. 63. #Crop-shin, n. [Another form Damne, v. †To doom, condemn of copshen, corpion, a herring of (to). A.D. 198.

ner.

E. 42.

V.

nounce.

E. 53

or

or

Damnified, pp. (ad. Lat. dam- Despight, n. (A form of Denificare, to injure.) Injured. Rare. spite.) Phr. In their despight: to 5. 3. 577.

their prejudice or injury. Arch. Dampe, n. (a) †An exhalation; 5. 3. 384. Cf. note. (b) fog, mist. 5. 3. 525 (cf. note), Desseigne, n. (A form of De

sign.) Purpose, plan. 1. 2. 29; 527.

Dealt, pp. Negotiated or treated 2. 2. 228. (with), in bad sense. Arch. 4. 4. 31.

Detract, v. tr. To disparage; deDeare, adj. Precious; valuable. preciate. Rare. 5. 1. 92; 5. 3. 617.

Deuise, v. To forge, invent. P'Death, interj. God's death. Arch. 3. 4. 351. 3. 2. 4, et passim.

Difference, n. Phr., make a difDeclame, fTo decry, .de- ference of. 5. I. 80; R. 8: Set

difference twixt, 1. 2. 252: Put dif

ference betweene, 5. I. 97-8. Arch. Declin'd, pp. adj. Sunk to an

A discrimination lit.

distinction unworthy object. Arch. 4. 6. 55.

viewed as conceived by the subject Decorum, n. (a) That which is rather than as existing in the obproper to the character, position, ject

. Now only in phr. to make a rank, or dignity of a real person.

difference: to distinguish, discrimiArch.; (b) That which is proper nate, act or treat differently. NED.

+Disbase, v. To debase; cause to the circumstances or require

to descend in the social scale. But ments of the case; seemliness,

cf. note.

2. I. 69. propriety, fitness. Arch. NED. 5.

Discipline, n. A system of con2. 32.

trol or government. I. 2. 29. *Defunct, adj.

489

5. 3. 288, (note), 493.

Disclaime, v. Phr., Disclaime

in: to renounce or disavow all Deiected, pp. (f. Lat. dejicere,

interest in.

I. 2. 108. to throw or cast down.] Cast

Discourse,

+Reasoning; down, in active sense. 3. 4. 191.

thought? 5. I. 101. Deiection, n. A casting down;

Discouer, v. To reveal, make humiliation. P. 22; 5. 3. 359. known. Arch. 2. 2. 173.

Delicates, n. pl. [ad. Lat. delic- Disease, n. Discomfort, trouble, tus, alluring, voluptuous.) Allure injury. 3. 5. 73. (In modern sense, ments; moods of complaisance. passim.) 2. 2. 197.

Disgrace, n. †Dishonor, as exDelicately, adv. +Delightfully. hibited by the person who inflicts 2. I. 8.

it. NED. A.D. 74. Denounce, v. (a) To accuse of? Disguis'd, adj. Disguising; de

(b) to threaten vengeance ceptive. Past participle used through? 3. 5. 82.

present. 4. 7. 55. Depraue, v. To vilify; defame Dishonest, adj. †Discreditable; 5. 3. 233.

shameful. 5. 3. 150.

n.

or

as

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