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A FOREWORD.

THE SPEAKER's Rooms

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

WASHINGTON, D. C., March 14, 1918.

Dear MR. HEISKELL:

It is a strange fact that two of the greatest English-speaking soldiers that ever lived, Oliver Cromwell and Andrew Jackson, never sent a squadron into the field until they were past middle life. I think that General Jackson's two victories, one at the Horseshoe Bend and the other at New Orleans, are two of the most remarkable achievements in military annals. His victory at New Orleans saved us, in my judgment, another war with Great Britain, and perhaps changed the history of the world. I know quite well that it changed the history of the United States, as it made Jackson President of the United States for eight years and Van Buren Vice-President for four years.

Colonel William Peters Hepburne, of Iowa, was a Lieutenant Colonel at that time. He was always more or less interested in military affairs, and once made an estimate calculating out of the number of shots fired the number of men hit. In ten or twelve of the most famous battles in the world, the number of British hit by Jackson's men, like Abou Ben Adhem, led all the rest; not only led all the rest, but left them out of sight.

Your friend,

CHAMP CLARK.

THE SETTLER.

His echoing axe the settler swung

Amid the sea-like solitude,
And rushing, thundering, down were flung

The Titans of the wood;
Loud shrieked the eagle as he dashed
From out his mossy nest, which crashed

With its supporting bough,
And the first sun-light, leaping, flashed

On the wolf's haunt below.

Rude was the garb, and strong the frame

Of him who plied his ceaseless toil:
To form that garb, the wild-wood gaine

Contributed their spoil;
The soul that warmed that frame disdained
The tinsel, gaud, and glare, that reigned

Where men their crowds collect;
The simple fur, untrimmed, unstained,

This forest tamer decked.

The paths which wound mid gorgeous trees,

The streams whose bright lips kissed their flowers, The winds that swelled their harmonies

Through those sun-hiding bowers,
The temple vast-the green arcade,
The nestling vale—the grassy glade,

Dark cave and swampy lair-
These scenes and sounds majestic, made
His world and pleasures, there.

-Alford B. Street.

Page.

CHAPTER 1. Introduction...

13–19

CHAPTER 2. Tennessee and Its Pioneers, The Wilderness Road

-Daniel Boone's Death-Byron's Tribute to Boone-Marking

the Trail-Cherokee Cession of South West Point to the United

States

20-33

CHAPTER 3. Tennessee and Its Governments-State of Franklin

Memorial at Greeneville, Tennessee...

34-46

CHAPTER 4. Knoxville and Gen. James White, its Founder-The

White Family --

47-59

CHAPTER 5. Knoxville--Original Plan, History and Newspapers

-Frederick S. Heiskell, Editor..

60-78

CHAPTER 6. William Blount-Expulsion From United States

Senate-Letter of Willie Blount.

79-101

CHAPTER 7. William Blount-Ordinance of 1787 and Blount's

Journal as Governor of the Territory South of the Ohio River. 102-127

CHAPTER 8. William Blount's Journal Continued

128-156

CHAPTER 9. John Donelson and the Donelsons--Voyage in the

Good Boat Adventure"-Andrew Jackson Donelson.

157-173

CHAPTER 10. Nashville..

174-189

CHAPTER 11. The Cherokees-Messages of Presidents Monroe,

John Quincy Adams, Jackson and Van Buren on Removal of

Indians.

190-215

CHAPTER 12. Cherokees-History Leading To Great Removal -

Cherokee Memorial to Congress..

216--233

CHAPTER 13. Cherokees—Two Decisions of the Supreme Court

of the United States--Cherokee Nation vs. State of Georgia-

The State of Georgia vs. Samuel A. Worcester..

234-248

Chapter 14. Cherokees—Treaty of New Eschota-The Great

Removal-General Scott's Proclamation and Letters-Death

of John Ross-Eulogy-Sequoya and Cherokee Alphabet-

Re-united Cherokees—Luke Lea, Indian Agent-Capt. Hene-

gar's Letter-Fort Loudon and John H. DeWitt's Speech ------ 249-280

CHAPTER 15. The Cherokees—Timberlake's Memoirs of Water

Journey from Long Island to Cherokees on Little Tennessee

River.

281-293

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