Page images
PDF
EPUB

tion :- It stands on a rock, which measures 150 feet long and 100 broad, and is 24 feet high at its highest point above the level of high-water spring tides. The light-house is a pillar of dressed granite, and the lantern covered by a spherical dome, which is painted white.

Governor of Prince of Wales Ieland, Singapore, and Malacca.

W. J. BUTTERWORTH,

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

EXPORTS OF CUBAN PRODUCTS.

The subjoined statistics of the leading products of the island of Cuba were compiled by a correspondent, from official documents, expressly for the Merchants' Jagazine :

QUANTITY OF SUGARS EXPORTED DURING THE FIVE YEARS ENDING

1790....
.boxes 340,762 1825...

.boxes 1,532,780 1795. 473,282 1830

2,033,793 1800. 716,673 1835

2,433,492 1805. 926,454 1840

3,171,423 1810. 943,777 1845

4,021,405 1815. 805,859 1850

5,310,768 1820.

1,127,388 1846. boxes 987,742 | 1849

.boxes 1,090,884 1847 1,274,811

1,219,613 1848

1,228,718 The annual increase during the above period is 25 per cent. In 1851 the export from Havana was 849,918 boxes, which, as compared to 1850, is an increase of nearly 20 per cent; allowing, therefore, only 15 per cent for the entire island, we may estimate the total exported in 1851 as 1,437,056 boxes.

1850.....

[blocks in formation]

QUANTITY OF JAFIA, OR SPIRITS FROM THE SUGAR CANE, EXPORTED DURING

YEARS ENDING

1830.....

· pipes 18,030 | 1845.....

.pipes

45,785 1835 19,951 1850

68,268 1840

31,174 1846..

..pipes
9,032 | 1849.....

..pipes

11,640 1847 19,432 1850

11,825 16,339 The annual increase is about 11 per cent during the 25 years. In 1851 the export from Havana was 5,792 pipes, which, compared to the previous year is a decrease of near 19 per cent. Therefore, presuming 14 per cent decrease in the whole island, the quantity exported in 1851 may be computed at 10,168 pipes.

1848.....

QUANTITY OF MOLASSES EXPORTED IN THE FIVE YEARS ENDING

1830. ...hogsheads 359,609 | 1845

hogsheads 735,374 1835 492,303 1850

1,200,777 1840

642,237 1846 ,hogsheads 203,597 1849

.hogsheads 246,570 1847 252,840 | 1850

269,044 1848.

228,726 The annual increase during the 25 years is 9 per cent. The quantity exported from Havana in 1851 was 44,539 bhds., which is near 50 per cent on the previous year. Taking into consideration that this article is chiefly exported from the smaller ports of the island, we may safely estimate the quantity exported in 1851, in pipes, say 400,000 hogsheads.

[blocks in formation]

The export of coffee has decreased about 2 per cent annually, or nearly 55 per cent since 1830.

From Havana was exported in 1851 37,563 quintals, which is a decrease of 12 per cent on the quantity exported in 1850. Thus, presuming 10 per cent decrease on the quantity exported in the wbole island, we may compute the total export of 1851 at 117,032 quintals.

QUANTITY OF TOBACCO LEAF EXPORTED IN TAR FIVE YEARS ENDING

[blocks in formation]

The annual increase in the export has been 7 per cent during the 25 years. In 1851 froin Havana were exported 37,595 quintals, which, compared to 1850, gives a decrease of near 6 per cent. Thus presuming 5 per cent as an equivalent for the whole island, the quantity exported in 1851, would be 75,791 quintals.

[blocks in formation]

1846.

.millares 153,156 | 1849..... ..millares 129,720 1817. 244,812 | 1850..

212,640 1848....

161,480 The annual increase has been 10 per cent during the 23 years. In 1851 were exported from Havana 261.989 millares, which, compared to 1850, gives an increase of 23 per cent; thus allowing 5 per cent for the rest of the island, gives the total export 277,569 millares.

QUANTITY OF COPPER ORE EXPORTED IN THE FIVE YEARS ENDING

1945 ............quintals 5,119,190 | 1850

...quintals 2,993,238 The increase during the last period, as compared to the first, is 41 per cent; but as the mining operations are daily increasing, and more attention given to this branch of indastry, it may be safely presumed it will be very productive ere long.

[blocks in formation]

1846.
..quintals
10,479 | 1849..

...quintals

8,923 1817 13,749 1850..

14,548 1818..

12,527 Annual increase 3 per cent during the 25 years.

The quantity exported in 1851 from Havana was 11,462 quintals, which, as compared to 1850, is about 4 per cent increase ; allowing like per centage for the entire island, the quantity exported in 1851 will be 15,129 quintals.

NEW YORK MANUFACTURED TOBACCO STATEMENT,

We are indebted to C. M. Connolly, Esq., for the following statement of the receipts, sales, and stocks for each month of the years 1850 and 1851, together with receipts in each year from 1839 to 1851, inclusive :

STATEMENT SHOWING RECEIPTS, SALES, AND STOCK FOR EACH MONTH PAST TWO YEARS.

[blocks in formation]

RECEIPTS OF TOBACCO FROM THE 1ST OF JANUARY TO THE 31ST OF DECEMBER IN EACH

YEAR FROM 1839 TO 1851.
Packages.
Packages.

Packages. 1839... 51,579 | 1844.. 97,536 | 1848...

113,336 1840.. 63,805 | 1845.. 105,682 1849..

117,594 1841.. 84,779 1846.. 112,1181850..

162,341 1842.. 62,366 | 1847.. 138,031 | 1851.....

163,210 1843.

61,676

26,084

Stock on hand 1st December, 1851
Receipts through December...
Less re-shipped to other ports....

..packages

11,912
2,224

9,688

35,772 Sales in December ...

5,814 Stock on hand 1st January, 1852...

29,958 N. B.— The stock on hand 1st January, 1852, by Messenger's Circular, of the 1st inst., was erroneously stated at 25,517, instead of 29,517.

THE COAL TRADE OF PHILADELPHIA,

Schooners.

We are indebted to Mr. HENRY Wilson, United States Inspector for the District of Richmond, for the following interesting table of the arrivals at Port Richmond, the terminus of the Reading Railroad, during the past year :LIST OF ARRIVALS AT PORT RICHMOND FROM THE 1ST OF JAN. 1851, TO DEC. 2018, 1851. Sbips. Barks. Brigs.

Sloops. Barges. January

122 February

146 March..

1
4

436 April.

13
16
452

91 May

15
19
467

18 June..

6
20
464

15 128 July...

7
37
605

13 221 August..

8
111
713

28 084 September..

17
92
576

29

347 October...

13

619

46

333 November.

5
52
529

40 December

17
13
250

13

60

103

372

[blocks in formation]

5,379

[blocks in formation]

ANTHRACITE COAL TRADE OF TAE UNITED STATES FOR 1851. For the following official returns of the anthracite coal trade, received from the different regions, which we publish in comparison with the supply of 1850, we are indebted to the Miners' Journal :

1850.

1851. Schuylkill

1,423,977 1,605,084

181,107 Canal

288,030
579,156

291,126

Increase.

Railroad....

[blocks in formation]

Increase in 1851......

1,026,831 1,026,831 The above table differs from the report of the Reading Railroad Co., because it embraces the quantity from December 31st, 1850, to December 31st, 1851. The railroad year commences and ends the 30th of November, and the quantity of coal sent to market in December, 1851, falls short about 45,000 tons of the quantity sent in December, 1850. Of the supply of coal furnished in 1851, Schuylkill county produced.. tons 2,184,240 All the other regions...

2,199,490

Total tons ....

4,383,730 The following table shows the progress of the anthracite coal trade of the United States in each decade from its commencement to 1851 :1821. 1831. 1841.

1851.
1,073
176,820
958,889

4,383,730 And ten years hence will probably reach ten million tons per annum.

IMPORT, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION OF IRON.

It appears, from Mr. Secretary Corwin's report, that the importations of bar and pig iron into the United States for the year ending 30th September, 1842, were 100,055 tons, and the estimated production for that period was 230,000 tons; making an aggregate consumption of 330,055 tons, or 404 pounds per head.

In 1846 the importations were 69,625 tons, and the production in the United States estimated at 765,000; making the consumption 834,625 tons, or 92 pounds per head.

In 1818 the importations were 153,377 tons, the production 800,000, and the consuinption 953,377 tons, or 994 pounds per head.

In 1849 the importations were 289,687 tons, the production 650,000, aad the consumption 939,687 tons, or 954 pounds per head.

In 1850 the importations were 337,532 tons, the production 564,000, and the codsumption 801,532 tons, or 867 pounds per head.

In 1851 the importations were 341,750 tons, the production 413,000, and the consumption 754,750 tons, or 6S4 pounds per head.

The history of iron manufacture, for the last few years, furnishes an instructive lesson to the statesmen of this country. This article enters into such general use in every occupation of life in all countries advanced beyond the first step of civilization, that it may well take rank amongst the necessaries of life in this country.

LUMBER TRADE OF BANGOR, MAINE. We are indebted to Samuel Harris, Esq., of Bangor, Maine, for the subjoined statement of Lumber surveyed at Bangor for the season of 1851, as follows :AMOUNT OF LUMBER SURVEYED AT BANGOR, DURING THE SEASON 1851, BY THE FOLLOWING

PERSONS.

James Allen........ feet 7,102,027 | L. B. Ricker.... . feet 4,378,842 George W. Cummings... 3,318,101 Moses Rowe

31.327 C. V. Crossman.. 9,291,982 T. F. Rowe.

1,528,290 Seth Emery 7,306,246 A. Smith,...

5,284,256 Herman Fisher.. 5,007,233 J. Short ...

3,495,281 Messenger Fisher.. 6,150.348 N. B. Wiggin

9,116,037 Hiram Ford... 5,940,440 G. W. Washburn..

3,287,999 B. Goodwin..... 528,873 M. Webster.

3,297,175 P. Haines 5,554,744 J. Webster

7,126,030 D. Kimball 6,147,903 Aaron Young.

10,506,309 Isaac Lincoln... 4,302,292 J. Young..

11,897,935 J. Milliken... 8,624,140 J. C. Young

14,183,655 J. Norris.. 14,559,359 S. W. Furber...

377,507 J. Oakes 2,131,144 J. Chamberlain ..

199,727 N. Pierce... 6,611,242 J. McFaden..

20,461 A. Pratt... 13,276,637 A. S. Meservey

876,081 W. T. Pearson...

16,672,762 O. W. Pierce. 3,993,387 Total .......

202,005,830 The following figures, from the books of the Surveyor General's Office, (for which we are obliged to that officer,) show the amount of lumber surveyed for the year 1851, as follows:Green Pine.....

.... feet 115,176,783 Dry Pine...

28,409,417 Spruce....

47,567,682 Hemlock, Hardwood, &c.

10,851,948

Total for 1851......
Total
survey

for 1850

202,005,830
203,754,201

THE BRITISH CORN TRADE FOR 154 YEARS.

Mr. Brown, one of the Secretaries of the London Statistical Society, has recently published at once the most compendious, comprehensive, and accurate view of the con trade of England that has ever been made. A Liverpool cotemporary gives the following summary of it:

“The quantities of wheat and wheat flour imported and exported, the price, the duty, and the titles of acts of Parliament regulating the duty, are given for 154 years on a single folio page, in excellent readable print, and with lucid arrangement. Mr. Brown's tabular view is calculated to suggest many interesting and instructive inferences, and we shall submit a few. For the first 94 years, or from 1697, in the reign of William III., we imported peither foreign por colonial corn, but we exported corn, and in some years to the amount of above 500,000 quarters. In the four years of the 17th century, the average price is about 538. which is about 1ns. a quarter more than the four years of our free trade, or 1ls, including the duty now charged. In so far, then, as bread corn is concerned, our people are at present better off than they were 150 years ago–in the good old times of William of Orange. The most remarkable feature of the early years of the table, reckoning from the commencement of the 18th century, is the extraordinary fluctuation of prices. In 1706 and 1707 we have corn at 238. 9d. and 26s. 1d., and in 1709 and 1710 at 718. 11d. and 718. 6d. In 1728 ve bave it at nearly 50s., and in 1732 we have it at 248. 4d., and in 1740 it is 45s. 4d. In short, in one year there was a glut, and in another, not far from it, something very like a famine. This miserable state of things evidently r rose from want of capital, want of agricultural skill, want of cheap means of conveyance, and reliance on the broken

« PreviousContinue »