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late, with Bangor and other ports of Maine, for the heavier articles of building lumber.

INSPECTIONS OF LUMBER AT BALTIMORE FOR THE LAST FOUR YEARS.

38,133,688 )

“ 1849 ......

« 1851......

Inspections in 1848... feet

Inspections in 1850... feet 63,000,000 59,673,039

60,000,000 In addition to the above, the Baltimore and Susquehanna Railroad brought to the city of Baltimore during the year 1851 about 9,000,000 feet-making the total receipts in 1851, inspected and uninspected, 69,018,611 feet, which, as compared with those of 1850, show a falling off of about 6,000,000 feet. This is owing to causes above stated.

Provisions. We are unable to lay before our readers at this time the receipts of this large and important branch of trade—those by the way of New Orleans in 1851, show a falling off of more than one-half as compared with the previous year—but the receipts of bulk meat and bacon per railroads and canals, were quite large. In consequence of the prevailing high prices last year, resulting from the short crop of hogs, the number taken by salters was small. The season proved profitable to dealers generally, on account of the continually advancing market, which was produced, not by any speculative disposition, but by the steady consumptive demand from the South. On the 1st of January, 1851, the stock of barreled pork on hand in all of the Northern cities of the Atlantic, was estimated, (in round numbers,) at 10,000 barrels, and on the 1st of the present month not over 15,000 barrels, showing a deficiency of 85,000 barrels. The stock now in this market does not exceed 800 barrels. By the official returns of cattle in Ohio, as made up by the county assessors, we find a deficiency this year from 1850, of 206,824 head of hogs, and from that of 1849 of 511,029_from these figures, which constitute the most reliable data upon which an opinion can be based at this stage of the season, we are led to believe that the number of hogs slaughtered this season will fall considerably short of last year. We publish below a tabular statement of the range of prices in this market for 1851.

PRICES OF PORK AND BACON,

9 26 a..

14 00 a ..
14 00 a ..

POR.

BACON,
Mess.

Prime.

Sides. Shoulders. Per bbl.

Per bbl.

Per lb.

Per ib. 1851.

Cents,

Cents. $12 50 a .. $9 00 a

8 a 84 January 11..

7 a 71 February 8 12 50 a 13 00

87 a 85 ✓ a 77 March 15.....

13 00 a

10 00 a 11 25 87 a 8$ 7 a 15 00 a

11 00 a April 12...

87 a 81

7 a 71 May 10.

16 00 a
13 50 a 14 00 84 a 9

77 a 77 June 14 .. 16 00 a ..

9} a 9

77 a 74 15 50 a

9 July 12.....

a 91

7 a 77 15 25 a 15 50 13 50 a 14 00 August 16.

95 a 94 74 a 8} September 13..

16 25 a 16 76
14 00 a ..

10 a 11 81 a 9 October 11.... 16 75 a 17 00 14 00 a 14 25 104a 11

9 a 9 November 15.. 16 00 a 16 50 13 75 a 14 00 94 a 101

9 a 97 December 13...

16 50 a ....
14 00 a 14 26 9 a 9}

9 & .. Salt. The importations of this article during the latter part of the year have been light, sales from vessel being made at $1 10 per sack for ground alum, and for a short period, on account of its scarcity, at $1 20; but subsequently prices declined.

The season is now pretty well over. The last cargo of direct importation sold for $1 06 per sack for ground alum, and $1 30 for common brands of fine. RECEIPTS OF SALT AT BALTIMORE FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31.

1851. 1850. From Liverpool....

.sacks 67,228 67,577 Coastwise.

65,888 23,720 From West Indies..

.. bushels 97,626 83,695

SPIRITS. There has been a great falling off in the amount of sales of wines and spirituous liquors during the past year, and prices have been very low, affording poor profits to importers.

TOBACCO. . On the 1st of January, 1851, the stock in our public and private warehouses was 11,529 hhds. The total inspections during the year amounted to 42,742 hhds., which, added to the stock on hand in January, made an aggregate of 54,271 hhds. Of this amount there have been shipped, as is seen by the statement annexed, 36,572 hhds., leaving the stock on hand on Ist inst., 17,699 hhds. showing an increase of 6,170 hhds, upon that of last year. .

The foreign exports the past year show a decrease from 1850 of 10,334 hhds., and those coastwise, of 5,860, making a total decrease in foreign and coastwise, of 16,294 hhds. The purchases of yellow and spangled Ohio for Austria and Russia, sum up about 3,500 hhds., a larger quantity than usual; and the superior selections and moderate prices of red descriptions, France not being a competitor, induced larger purchases for the Rhine. We review the course of the market as follows: The quotations in January were, for Maryland good ordinary $5.50 a $6 75; middling $7 to $8, and good to fine, from $8 50 to $10; for Ohio inferior to good common, $5 25 a $5 75; good red and spangled, $6 a $7 50; good and fine red and spangled, $8 a $11. The very reduced stock on hand at this time occasioned much firmness on the part of holders, and the inspections continuing light, prices were well maintained, with sales of upwards of 2,000 hhds. Maryland during the month, consisting principally of middling to fine leafy, at $6 to $8. Towards the close of March the receipts began to grow heavier, though amounting at the end of the first three months, to but 2,123 hhds., whilst the exports in the same period reached 2,734 hhds., leaving a stock on hand of only 10,066 hhds., the smallest quantity in our warehouses at any one time for a number of years. In April the market began to decline, and prices continued depressed until the quotations were, in June, for Maryland common to good ordinary, $4 50 a $6; middling, $6 a $6 50; good to fine brown, $7 50 a $8, and for Ohio reds, $5 a $7 50, and spangled and yellow $6 50 a $13. Near the close of June very unfavorable accounts were received from Planters in Maryland, to the effect that the crop was suffering from the drouth; and this intelligence continuing for several weeks, served to impart more firmness to factors, and a large portion of the stock was temporarily withdrawn from the market.' Owing to this, sales of Maryland were made in July at an advance of 25 cts. per 100 lbs., upon prices paid three months previously. The market remained with this feeling until early in August, whilst for Ohio descriptions, in consequence of the limited demand, it was difficult to obtain former prices, particularly for reds; since then the tendency for both Maryland and Ohio has continued downward. The crop of Maryland turned out to be inferior to that of other years, and all the grades of this growth, from common to fine qualities, are now selling at an average of $1 50 to $2 per 100 lbs. less than at the commencement of the season. The crop of Ohio was likewise very inferior; all the descriptions, however, of yellow and spangled brought fair prices until near the middle of October, since when they have been neglected. In the absence of the usual demand for France this year, the descriptions of red Ohio tobacco suitable for that government have continued to decline from the opening of the business, and the quotations are now much lower, with a stock left over of about 6,000 hhds. We quote present prices, viz.; for Maryland frosted, $3 a 3 50; common to good ordinary, $3 50 a 4 50; middling, $5 a 6, and good to fine brown, $7 to 8 a $9. Ohio, for inferior to good common, $4 a 5; good red and spangled, $550 a 6 50; good and fine red and spangled, $7 to $10; good and fine yellow, $11 to $13. Prices of Ohio as quoted only nominal.

TOBACCO STATEMENT, SHOWING THE QUANTITY IN THE SEVERAL WAREHOUSES ON THE IST

OF JANUARY, 1851, THE INSPECTIONS BY EACH HOUSE FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEY

BER 31, DELIVERIES FOR THE SAME PERIOD, AND STOCK ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1852Tobacco, State warehouses. No. 1. No. 2. No. 3, No. 4. No, 5. Total. Stock, January 1, 1851.. 3,293 1,697 1,974 1,673 1,980 10,617 Inspections of 1851..... 10,044 7,922 7,151 8,860 8,765 42,742

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Stock, Jan. 1, 1852. 3,996 3,259 2,708 4,082 3,654 17,699 THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT SHOWS THE STOCK IN WAREHOUSES ON THE IST OF JANUARY,

1851, AND THE QUANTITY OF EACH KIYD INSPECTED FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. Stock in warehouses, January 1, 1851..

.bhds. 10,617 Stored in private warehouses...

912 Total...

11,529 Inspections from January 1 to December 31, 1851, viz:Maryland ...

.hhds. 25,013 Ohio.....

16,798 Kentucky

878 Pennsylvania...

53 Virginia. Total..

42,742

54,271

.hhds.

Exported from January 1, 1850, to 1851:-
To Bremen....

Rotterdam*
Amsterdam..
Havret
Austria ..
England.
Spain....
Russia
Hamburg...
West Indies...
Africa....
Coastwise..

12,654
9,694
4,154
2,327
1,850
1,320
1,158

602
175
166

24
2,548

36,672

Stock, January 1, 1852.....

17,699 Manufactured Tobacco. The stock of manufactured tobacco now in agents' hands is light for the season, and made up chiefly of medium and good kinds. Fine tobacco is scarce, and will maintain high prices during the spring and summer, and of common grades the market is poorly supplied, when we consider that this is the season for their manufacture. Prices show a decided improvement over the unsteady rates of last summer, when the stock was much larger; sales were depressed, and the prospect of a heavy crop gave cause for alarm. The markets of Virginia are becoming very bare of the raw material, and

prices have advanced to a position which, with the large orders (including the French contract) soon to come into market, will at least be maintained, if a further advance does not occur. The prospects of a good and early spring business in this article are favorable. We quote:

Cents,
Fine pound lumps, from.. 35 to 40 No 1, 5's a 8's...
Good

25 to 30 Medium“ Medium

:: 18 to 20 a 22 Common kinds, from.. First brands of 5's a 8's...

Cents, 18 to 20 14 to 16 10 to 12

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• Including 637 hbds. on board ship Alabama, not cleared. + Including 350 hhds. shipped via New York.'

Nole. The quantity exported coastwise, as reported above, is exclusive of that received from the District of Columbia, amounting to 600 or 700 hhds., which is not required to be inspected at Baiti

more.

WHISKY. There are three distilleries in Baltimore kept in active operation the year round, capable of manufacturing at least 200 barrels a day; and another establishment upon a large scale is about to commence business. The whole amount manufactured here during the past year must have reached, at the lowest calculation, 40,000 barrels; and the quantity received from the country is estimated at 60,000 barrels; making a total, in round numbers, of 100,000 barrels.

TOBACCO INSPEOTIONS AT BALTIMORE FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS.

703

Years, 1851, 1850. 1849. 1848. 1847. 1816. 1815. 1844. 1813. 1842. 1841.

Maryland.
25,013
27,085
30,689
23,491
34,580
41,416
39,538
32,249
29,354
33,759
29,980

Ohio. 16,798 13,965 13,664

9,702 15,219 29,626 26,696 15,464 13,465 11,278 7,692

Virginia and other kinds. Total 931

42,742 783

41,833 1,248

45,601

33,906 772

50,571 754

71,896 1,755

67,989 1,244

48,957 4,877

47,696 1,439

46,476 1,479

39,151

EXPORTS OF TOBACCO FROM THE PORT OF BALTIMORE, FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS.

Yearg.

Bremen. Rotterdam. Amsterdam. France. All other pla's. Total. 1851.

12,654 9,694 4,154 2,327 5,292 34,124 1850.

15,864 7,814 6,973 8,177 6,640 44,368 1849.

18,821 13,783 8,725 9,562 1,033 51,924 1848.

12,787 7,910 3,103 4,959 131 38,890 1847,

22,967 7,819 11,388 9,413 1,895 53,482 1846.

24,404 9,498 6,181 6,371 3,037 49,491 1845.

26,832 18,171 10,944 7,183 2,880 66,010 1844.

17,139 11,864 7,095 7,212 1,594 44,904 1843.

16,990 6,525 7,325 7,932 3,822 42,594 1842.

17,719 18,874 8,109 4,682 2,379 43,763 1841.

16,373

7,918 6,169 6,022 2,519 88,001 Wool. As near as can be estimated, there have been about 500,000 lbs. of domestic wool of all descriptions sold in this market during the past year. About the first of June prices ruled high, averaging for washed 37 cents, and for unwashed one-third less; after that time the market fell down to 30 cents, since when, however, it has been steadily improving. We understand that the high prices which wool brought last year induced many farmers to turn their attention more particularly to sheep, so that in all probability there will be an increased production of wool in 1852 upon that of last year. There were but two cargoes of foreign wool imported here during the year, amounting to about 200,000 lbs., all Peruvian, a part of which has, we understand, been sent to England, and the remainder is still in the market.

EXPORTS OF BALTIMORE IN 1861.

Domestic produce in American vessels.. .
Domestic produce in foreign vessels....

$4,460,620

1,775,041

Total domestic produce exported...
Foreigo merchandise in American vessels..
Foreign merchandise in foreign vessels

Total exports of foreign merchandise ......
Value of domestic produce exported, as given above..

$6,285,661 $224,579

5,925

$230,504 6,235,661

Total exports for 1851.
Total exports for 1850.

$6,466,166 $8,626,457 Art. 1.-OPDYKE'S POLITICAL ECONOMY.*

A CHANGE in the civil affairs of mankind so wide and so vast as that which consists in the substitution of Republican principles for absolutism, or limited monarchies, must necessarily cause an entire revolution in those sciences which are founded upon the existence of political institutions. So fundamental are the principles of government, and so antagonistic is despotism to popular rights, that the establishment of the latter must render false a large mass of the opinions and doctrines held as sacred within the domain of arbitrary power.

The influence of Republican principles bas, even yet, manifested itself only in a feeble degree in this country, in consequence of the habit of the people to look for knowledge, science, and truth, to the stores that have been accumulated under the dark and frowning shadow of absolutism that has for centuries brooded over Europe, or under monarchical systems. Happily a brighter day is at hand. The citizens of this country must become popularized, not only in their rights, their institutions, but in their systems of political and social science.

This is a feature that has struck is very favorably in the work on Political Economy which is now open before us; and when we find the author declairing as he does in the following extract from his preface, that republicans need a system of Political Economy in perfect harmony with the other portions of their political edifice, he at once awakens in us an interest to peruse his pages. Speaking of Mill's work on Political Economy, his words are these :

“ Like most other scientific works on this subject, it is the production of one who has been reared and educated under political institutions very different from ours; and it is chiefly designed to meet the wants of British readers. For these reasons we must expect to find it imbued with ideas and opinions in which we cannot concur, as well as encumbered with discussions of no direct interest to

What we republicans need, is a system of Political Economy in perfect harmony with the other portions of our political edifice. In other words, we want an honest, straightforward system-a system grounded on the broad principles of justice and equality, and in all its doctrines and legislative applications solely designed to illustrate and enforce those principles. We have no right to look for anything of this kind from quarters in which the opposite principles of government are taught and practiced upon; but we have a right to expect it from Americans. Indeed we are already required to devise such a system for our own guidance: our duty to ourselves and to the form of government we have adopted, alike demand 'it. Nor can we much longer neglect this duty without forfeiting our claims to the title of consistent republicans.”

It is from a work of such high aims and character, although the author seems entirely unconscious of any pretensions of the kind, and speaks of his volume as,

a rudely drafted model of what such a treatise should be," that we propose to present a few outlines, by way of inducement to our readers to seek out this volume, and to contemplate the science of Political Economy in its republican aspect.

Of course, in an effort of this kind, it is necessary to probe the first

us.

* A Treatise upon Political Economy: By George Opdyke. 12mo. pp. 339. Published for the proprietor by G, P. Putnam.

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